This Day in History: December 21st, 1920

Milltown National Bank at Michelin Tire - 1924

“Sailor” Voorhees Is Captured With Watson In Daring Attempt to Rob Milltown Bank; Knocked Unconscious by Bullet; Two Escape

Force Way Into Vault But Abandon $3,000 in Silver When Surprised by Posse

Local Man Charged with Long Series of Crimes Captured by Posse – Bandits Fail to Get Bank Loot – Planned to Rob Post Office.


Frank “Sailor” Voorhees of this city, sought for nearly two years by the police of New Brunswick and a dozen other cities, was captured last night with a companion. Walter Watson. of Melrose, Mass., in an attempt to rob the First National Bank of Milltown. Two other men who were with them managed to escape.

Voorhees and Watson, who first gave his name as Clifford Jackson of New York, were captured after a top chase by a posse of citizens hastily gathered by Mayor Christian Kuthlthau of Milltown after Herman Willenbrock, a nightwatchman at the Michelin Tire Co. plant, had reported the robbers at work. In attempting to scale the wall in front of the bank, Voorhees was struck a glancing blow in the head by a bullet and was knocked unconscious. He was seized as he fell to the ground and Watson was captured at the same time. The two other men escaped through the rear of the bank property along Lawrence brook and eluded their pursuers there.

The robbery occurred at about midnight last night. Shortly after even o’clock an automobile, without lights, and said to contain four men and a woman, was seen proceeding along Main street, Milltown, in the direction of the bank. The car was seen by a group of young men in front of the Michelin Community House, but little attention was paid to it. The car turned into John street and stopped there.

Some time later when Night Watchman Herman Willenbrock was making his rounds of the Michelin plant the bank being located in one of Michelin buildings he saw a man standing in a doorway opposite the bank. As Willenbrock passed the man whistled, and Willenbrock saw another man inside.

Posse Called Out.

Instead of attacking the men. Willenbrock at once informed Head watchman Charles Beecher. The latter got in touch with Mayor Christian Kuhlthau of Milltown, who immediately went to the bank, gathering a  posse of about forty men, armed with rifles, shotguns and revolvers, on the way. So quick were they that they reached the bank within ten minutes after the alarm was given.

The robbers apparently had not, paid much attention to the watchman, for they were still in the bank when the posse approached. The posse closed in from all sides in an attempt to surround the robbers, but their eagerness to get Voorhees and Watson the other men eluded them.

Several volleys were fired at the escaping robbers, but apparently, the only one that took effect was the shot that hit Voorhees. It passed through his derby hat and glanced along the top of his head.

Voorhees was picked up and caried into the bank office. Dr. Riva was immediately summoned, but before he completed his examination of the man Voorhees came to and was able to sit up. Both prisoners were brought to New Brunswick and were lodged in the county jail.

County Detective John Ferguson was summoned from New Brunswick and began an investigation of the case at once.

The car which the men had used was found on John street and was seized and brought to New Brunswick by Detective Ferguson and Superintendent Robert Matlack of the Russell Playing Card Co. No trace could be found of the woman said to have been with the party and Voorhees and his companion denied that any woman had been with them.

“Sailor” Voorhees

Broke Into Vault.

It was found that the robbers had forced an entrance into the bank by wrenching a bar from a rear window and that they then dug a hole about a foot square through the brick wall of the bank vault, but. they were unable to force the safe inside the vault in which most of the money was contained.

A bag containing $3,000 to silver was found in the yard in the rear of the bank, apparently handed out by one of the men but abandoned when they were surprised.

All the safe deposit boxes in the vault had been opened and their contents scattered around, but it was impossible for bank officials to say whether anything had been taken from these or not, and it was reported that $2,400 in Liberty Bonds had been secured. Bank officials said that nothing else had been taken and they were not sure whether these bonds were secured or not.

Voorhees was quite willing to talk after his arrest and said that he had planned this to be his “last trick” and that if he had been given five minutes more he would have escaped. He said that it had also been planned to rob the Milltown post office.

A man was said to have been seen loitering around the post office last night. He also declared that it had been planned to take the loot to Trenton by automobile and then go back to New York by train.

Long Wanted Here.

Voorhees has long been a thorn in the sides of police and county officials here and has been suspected of being the ringleader in half a dozen holdups and robberies. He is wanted by the county detectives for the two Wolfson robberies, the attempt to rob Tepper Brothers, the holdup of the Hanover Shoe Store, and robberies of Houghton and Strauss, S. Spitz, Stewart and Clayton, in New Brunswick, the local Y. M. C. A. and Sol Rubenstein’s at Perth Amboy.

He is also wanted in New Bedford, Mass., where he broke Jail on July 30 last, New Rochelle, Peekskill and White Plains, N. Y., and Elizabeth and Plainfield in this State. Watson is also wanted in New Bedford.

The men have been in New York for some time, they said, and Voorhees declared this morning that on one occasion he escaped from a house there just as County Detective. Fred David entered.

Detective David has taken up the chase of the two men who escaped end hopes to have them in custody shortly. He refused to talk in reference to the statements made by the men.

It is not known yet whether Voorhees and Watson were implicated in the Stillman and Woolworth robberies, but these are being carefully investigated.

Alfred S. Puerschner, warden of the county jail, took no chances on letting his prisoner escape and he remained on guard himself all night, at the jail. Special precautions are being taken to safeguard the prisoners.


This Day in History: December 2nd, 1914

This Day in History: December 2nd, 1914

MILLTOWN COUPLE ON TRIAL FOR KEEPING SPEAKEASY

Breton, Who Knew Mr. and Mrs. Porgoinnec in France, is the Principal Witness Against Them When They Face Jury Today.


John Porgoinnec and his wife, Marianna Porgoinnec, are being tried this afternoon on a charge of running a “speak-easy” at Milltown. According to Assistant Prosecutor Stricker’s opening, they sold without a license on October 6 and various other times within the past two years.

The State’s principal witness against the Porgoinnecs, who are French, was John Leroux, a Breton. Leroux cannot speak English, so Albert F. Russell was sworn as French interpreter. It is a long time since any French translation has been required in the local court.

Leroux testified that he had visited the Pergoinnec place many times within the past two years, buying beer and whiskey there. When ask- ed how many times, he said it was so many that he couldn’t remember the number, but thought it at least twenty.

On cross-examination by Walter Van Sickle he said that he had lived. in Milltown two years and worked in the Nickel works, in this city. He met the Porgoinnecs the day after he arrived in Milltown, but had known them before that, in France.

The Jury.

The following jury heard the case: Charles E. Paxton, Elmer C. Slater, A. C. Shreeve, Thomas Horan, Charles E. Breckwedel, John Case, Harvey H. Mershon, George F. Giles, A. G. Snedeker, Louis Appleget, Michael Masterson, E. W. Clayton.


This Day in History: December 1st, 1920

Location of MIlltown National Bank 1917 - 1924

$50,000 WILL BE GIVEN OUT IN XMAS FUND


MILLTOWN, Dec. 1 – In a few days Milltown’s big banking establishment, the First National Bank, will distribute to over two thousand customers a Christmas fund of about $50,000 which speaks well for the increased business the banks did in 1920.

The local institution has been building up a great savings account for many borough people through their knack of thriftiness. which while it helped their own. business enabled many to set aside. a nice sum for a rainy day. The National Bank here has been growing by leaps and bounds and in their step forward much credit is. bestowed upon the able cashier, Howard J. Booream, and his capable assistant, Edwin Kuhlthau, as well as Ernest Sheppard, clerk, and Miss Helen Lindstrom, stenographer.

Both Mr. Booream and Mr. Kuhlthau are experienced banking men. Mr. Booream with fifteen years of work in this branch. They have untiringly worked to bring the local. bank on a par with any other its. size in the State and the Christmas fund this year, which will be given. out about the 13th of the month, is almost double that of 1919. The 1921 fund will begin in the middle of the month and efforts will be made to have it set 1920 in the background.

Fast Work on School.

There is a probability of the new addition to the public school here being completed before the present school term runs out. The contractors are working exceptionally fast and the framework of the annex which is of course of brick is almost up and as soon as the e roof is on, the remaining work will be only a question of time as the weather will not, interfere them.

The educators will be pleased to see it finished for they have certainly been up against a bad proposition to regulate the proper training and the one session for the scholars is not by any means tr satisfactory.

Tomorrow night in the Community House the Michelin five will entertain by playing the fast Triangles of Bound Brook. A good game is looked forward to.

The Women’s Republican Club of Milltown will meet tomorrow evening at 7 o’clock in the public school. All members and others interested are urged to attend.


This Day in History: November 24th, 1920

Michelin tire Promotional Postcard 1910

LIQUOR SALES AT MILLTOWN HIT BY COMMERCE BOARD


MILLTOWN, Nov. 24-The first luncheon-meeting of the Milltown Chamber of Commerce was held last evening at the Michelin Cafeteria which proved to be one of the most interesting meetings ever held by this body. A feature of the gathering was the condemnation of the borough’s present “wide-open” condition.

Those present were: Frank G. Boyce, J. M. Crabiel, H. A. Christ, W. R. Evans, E. V. Emens, J. P. Herbert. Ida J. Hermann, William S. Hannah, J. H. Junker, J. Knoll. Jr., M. Kropp. John Klotzbach, C. Kuhlthau, K. Kuhlthau, W. H. Kuhlthau, C. W. Kuhlthau, Geo. Kuhlthau, Geo. Lowne, H. R. M. Meyers, Spencer Perry, C. C. Richter, C. M. Snedeker. Philip Simpson. Harold J. Schlosser, Addison Thompson. Fred Wagner, Charles Zimmerman, Mrs. Chas. Hodapp. Miss Susie Crabiel, Louis Slon. Irving Crabiel, Dr. S. F. Weston and Howard S. DeHart.

After the luncheon which was thoroughly enjoyed by all the regular meeting was indulged in, President John H. Klotzbach presiding. Clerk of the Board of Education Howard S. DeHart made the first address of the evening in presenting the business side of the Board of Education to those present, presenting the fact that the larger attendance, higher cost of textbooks, higher salaries paid teachers, etc., of today, have a great bearing on the great expense that is attached to our school today, especially calling attention that the transportation of our children which alone runs up as high as four thousand dollars in the course of a year. Mr. DeHart urged the hearty co-operation of the folks of the town to insure proper training of the children.

Dr. S. F. Weston, supervising principal of the school, was the next speaker of the evening on the Relation of School to Education, what education does toward making for a safer democracy, and also how the social and recreational education of a child tends to develop that child in the higher and better methods of life. Dr. Weston dwelt upon the opportunities afforded today to the man or woman who has been properly prepared for life by means of an education.

The fact was brought out as to following out the methods of instruction as laid down by the State and that the local school is complying with all requirements of the State body with exception of the fact that there is no domestic science department at this time. The reason being given that up to this time there has not been sufficient room, and secondly, the Board of Education did not feel financially able to put on any more expense than they were absolutely compelled o at this time.

The fact was also brought out during the discussions that while a four-room addition is being added to the present school structure it will not be many years before more room will be required. The Clerk stated in fact that if it was not for the high cost of building materials and Labor a new eight-room school would have been asked for at this time instead of only a four room addition to the present building.

The second question on the calendar-Does Milltown get a share of fish and game in comparison with the licenses issued? Many of the sportsmen present did not think Milltown did get a fair share of game and upon the suggestion of those present a committee of three was appointed to make an investigation and report back to the Chamber at the next meeting, namely: Fish and Game Committee: Charles Zimmerman, Charles Snedeker, Harold J. Schlosser. The question of can Milltown have its own electrical inspector to insure better service in Milltown was thoroughly discussed and the sentiment was that Milltown should have its own inspector.

Who knows the police signal system? This question was spoken upon by chairman of the police committee of the borough council, Harold J. Schlosser who explained that if anyone desired a policeman at any time to call the Michelin Tire Company and they would be sure to find one of the town officers there at any time during the day and any time in the evening up to 11 30 o’clock. It was pointed out that an arrangement had been made some years ago with the Telephone Company so that the telephone operator would know just what course to pursue. By mutual consent the matter was left in the hands of the borough council for their consideration.

After a discussion of the trolley service being given to Milltown at present, the following resolution was adopted, the secretary being instructed to forward a copy to the superintendent at New Brunswick and also one copy to headquarters in Newark, namely:

Whereas, the Public Service Railway Company has recently placed in operation cars between Milltown and New Brunswick on a fifteen minute schedule.

“Resolved, that the Chamber of Commerce voice its approval of this progressive step, and that we extend our thanks to the Railway Company, and sincerely trust that this arrangement may continue in effect permanently to the mutual advantage of the Railway Company and the people of our community.

“Resolved further that it would also be very much appreciated if the “Milltown only cars” could be run as far as Heinz’ Switch so-as to give South Milltown residents service equal to that of North Milltown residents.

“Resolved further, that a copy of this resolution be forwarded to the General Manager of the Public Service Railway Company at Newark and a copy to the local superintendent at New Brunswick.”

Would a retail merchants association be of interest to Milltown business men was discussed favorably and the following committee was appointed to make investigation and report at the next meeting with the view of getting such an organization underway: Retail Merchants Committee: C. W. Kuhithau, F. G. Boyce, H. A. Christ.

Harry R. B. Meyers, ex-president of the Chamber of Commerce came out forcibly on the question of law and order, pointing out the amount of drunkenness in Milltown, the bold and open sales of liquor, the playing of poker, shooting of craps and the like. It was pointed out that there: is no time like the present for a general cleaning up in this respect and upon motion, the secretary was authorized to communicate to the Borough Council that the subject of law enforcement was thoroughly discussed at this meeting of the Chamber of Commerce and ask that the Council give the matter their very careful consideration.

Harold J. Schlosser, chairman of the police committee, was given an opportunity to express himself. He stated that there were violations of the law going on and only recently a crap game was raided but for some reason or other there was no publicity given the matter.

It was pointed out that a general. clean-up that would keep the town boys out of questionable games and pastimes would not only be in the town’s interest but in the interest of the boys themselves as far as their economic advancement is concerned.

It was also pointed out during the discussion that any organization that would permit gambling in its rooms. was not only a disgrace to the organization but to the town as well.

An editorial from one of the country newspapers setting forth a plan to gain information as to the attractiveness of a town by sending out a questionnaire to each member asking what induced them to come to the town in which they live was read by the secretary for future information of the Chamber.

Charles E. Denhard and Louis Sion were admitted into membership of the Chamber.

The Civic Department of the Chamber of Commerce reported that the Hallowe’en celebration was the most successful affair of its kind ever held in this section. The financial report of the celebration was as follows:

Amount of Collections

John Christ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00

Alfred Christ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5.00

Dr. Forney. . . . . . . .  . . . . . . . . . .  . .$5.00

C. W. Kuhlthau. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5.00

Buster Brown Shoe Store. . . . . . . . . $5.00

Hugo Laufer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2.00

Mrs. McGaughey. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2.00

Mrs. L. J. Hermann. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1:00

Frank Hodapp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5.00

Frank Hodapp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5.00

H. A. Christ Co…….. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5.00

Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $50.00

Expenses

Music for dancing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.00

Hall decorations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5.49

Red lights. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4.80

Prizes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $40.00

Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $82.29

The $50.00 collected having been used for payment of bills as indicated above, the following were or- dered paid out of the funds of the Chamber of Commerce to make up the deficit, namely:

J. M. Crablel, advances…. .$22.00

Estate C. Hodapp . . . . $4.80

Mae E. Kuhlthau, sundries… . . $5.49

Total . . . . . . . . . . .$32.29

General expenses were ordered paid

as follows:

C. Jensen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  $4.00

J. H. Junker, secretary, stamps

envelopes and post cards . . . . . . . $2.03

The following resolution was adopted:

“Whereas the Chamber of Commerce of the Borough of Milltown in regular session assembled at the Michelin Cafeteria are fully aware of the educational, recreational and social advantages that the Michelin Community House affords to the Borough of Hilltown, be it and it is hereby

“Resolved that a vote of thanks by the Chamber of Commerce be ex-tended to the Michelin Tire Company for their untiring efforts to make Milltown not only an attractive place to live but to work as well. “Resolved further that a copy of this resolution be sent to the Michelin Tire Company and that a copy be spread upon the minutes of this organization.”



Church Notices.

Tomorrow morning at the Re- formed Church John Schmidt will occupy the pulpit at 10:20 in a special Thanksgiving service. A special collection for the Middlesex Hospital of New Brunswick will be taken. All are cordially invited to attend.

Tonight will be Women’s Home Missionary night at the St. James Church, New Brunswick, and all local members are urged to attend the meeting.

The Women’s Republican meeting scheduled for tomorrow night has been postponed by the president, Mrs. Kuhlthau, and will be held next week. All members are asked to please vote.

Mr. and Mrs. Irving Crablel have returned from their wedding trip spent in the New England States.

Friday, December 10, has been set aside by the Reformed Church Ladies’ Aid Society for their annual Christmas sale in Fed Men’s hall.

The bazaar or fair now in progress by the local Catholic mission will close tonight and it will be the last chance to get some real Christmas gifts at real bargains. Dancing will

also be enjoyed. A large crowd was on hand last night.

Movies.

For the first time, Douglas Fairbanks will appear on the screen in Milltown tomorrow night when the Michelin Community House opens for the screen stars to entertain local people. A big crowd is expected to see the opening show in the borough. For the attraction here in the afternoon see the sporting page.


This Day in History: November 22, 1913

This Day in History: November 22, 1913

ORDINANCE TO WIDEN RIVE AVE. IS PASSED


MILLTOWN, Nov. 22.-An adjourned meeting of the Borough Council was held last evening. Mayor Conrad Richter presided. Councilmen Chas. Baurles, Henry Kuhlthau, Geo. E. Crabiel, Al Skewis, B. Miller, Clerk R. A. Harkins, Messrs. C. W. Waddington and R. B. Sheppard of the water commission board were present.

The following bills were ordered paid:

Chas. Hoffman. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 2.00

Home Insurance Co. . . . . . . . . . . $12.80

C. P. Stelle. . . . . . . .  . . . . . . . . . . $239.35

Mrs. John Lins was permitted to remove two trees in front of her property on Clay and Church streets The trees had been damaged by lightning.

A resolution approving the plans and specifications of the Sewer and Water Commission was adopted.

An ordinance regarding the widening of Riva avenue, from Main to Clay street was introduced passed on the first reading.

The ordinance provided that the borough would remunerate property owners for any damage that might be incurred and if agreement could not be made the Borough will have the right to condemn such property as may be necessary to obtain the desired width.

Prior to introduction of the above ordinance a petition from several property owners along the avenue was presented.

A resolution was adopted that the borough clerk post notice of intention for widening of the avenue in five of the most prominent places in the borough.

On motion the clerk was authorized to notify the railroad as to the condition of the crossing at Main street near the Michelin Tire Co.

The clerk was also authorized to notify the Board of Freeholders as to the condition of the bridge crossing Lawrence Brook.

The light committee was authorized to purchase a transformer for use in connection with the ventilating system at the school.

On motion the clerk was authorized to send a special notice to the property owners along Riva avenue, who have not as yet signed petitions for widening of said avenue.

Milltown to Have New Order.

C. H. Crenning, who is well versed in lodge work, has decided to use his best efforts towards instituting an Order of Owls in the borough, provided he can secure the necessary signers to the petition, which he is about to circulate. While the Order of Owls is practically now here in the East, it was founded at South Bend, Ind., in November, 1904. During its existence the growth has been marvelous, and branches of the order have been established in nearly every State in the Union as well as through Canada. Nearly 1,900 nests have been instituted with a membership of over 300,000.

The owls have a furnished home for their orphans where they educate them, at South Bend, Ind. They also have their own hospital. They now have a bill before Congress to set aside public land for a tuberculosis hospital and camp for the members of the order. They assist deserving widows of deceased members by a monthly pension. Their ritual; is beautiful and ennobling. They advocate no creed-nothing offensive to any man’s religion.

The special charter fee is $5 per member, and any one between the ages of 13 and 55 desiring to be- come a charter member may do so by singing the petition. After the charter is closed the regular initiation fee will not be less than $10; hence you can readily see the advisability of getting in on the ground floor.

The motto of the Order of Owls is as follows:

“There’s so much bad in the best of us,

And so much good in the worst of us,

It hardly behooves any of us

To speak ill of the rest of us.

They also have a toast, which reads as follows:

“Here’s to the man whose hand Is firm when he holds your own. Like a grip of steel that makes you feel

You’re not in the world alone.”

The new home of Charles Durham is nearing completion so far as the exterior is concerned.

Other Town Topics.

William Kuhlthau, Sr., is spending a few days at Morris Park, L. I. A reward of $10 has been offered. for information that will lead to the arrest of the parties that entered the building, adjoining Red Men’s Hall, and splattered paint, about the walls and floor.

At the Churches.

At the Methodist Church there will be special revival services, both morning and evening, and in the event of Miss Annie Agnes Smith, the evangelist, not putting in an appearance, Rev. L. L. Hand will occupy the pulpit. There is, however a likelihood of Miss Smith being able to take up her duties here tomorrow.

At the German Reformed Church there will be memorial service in the morning at 10.30, and members of families that have been bereaved during the past year are especially requested to be present. Sunday school will be held at 9.30 a. m. as usual. Young People’s Society will meet at 7 o lock and usual evening service will be held at 7.30. there will be services held on thanksgiving Day at 10.30 a. m.


This Day in History: November 4th, 1915

Luigi Aquino alias Louis Quinn

QUINN FREE OF MURDER IN ITALY

Fellow Countrymen Acquit Man Charged With Murdering Mrs. Tessie Kubbery at Milltown Remarkable Ending of Tragedy That Stirred the County.


Following closely upon the conviction of Porter Charlton, an American who was tried in Italy for murder, comes the announcement in the form of a communication to Prosecutor Florance that Luigi Aquino, alias Louis Quinn, charged with the murder of Mrs. Tessie Kuberry, at Milltown on July 25, 1913, has been acquitted and set at liberty by the Court of Assise at Avelino, Italy.

Following the crime at Milltown, Quinn escaped to Italy, his native country, where he was arrested in December, 1913, through a decoy letter sent by County Detective John

CONTINUED ON PAGE SEVEN.

R. Ferguson. The prosecutor at that time was George S. Silzer and nothing was left undone to bring about the arrest of Quinn, but efforts to have him sent back here for trial failed utterly.

Sworn affidavits, however, were forwarded to Italy by Mr. Silzer and later by Prosecutor Florance, including the testimony of two eye-witnesses to the tragedy, both of whom fastened the crime upon Quran. It WIA generally felt that the CISO against the prisoner was of the strongest, hence the action of the Italian Court is all the more surprising

Mrs. Kuberry was a general favorite and was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Litkenhaus, of this city. She was employed at the plant of the Michelin Tire Company, in front of whose property the shooting took place. Quinn had also been an employee of the tire works and had paid attention to Mrs. Kuberry, who repulsed him. It was believed that Jealousy led to the shooting.

Charles Rick, a Syrian, who saw the murder of Mrs. Kuberry and tried to prevent Quinn’s escape, was shot in the neck and was a patient in a local hospital for some time after the killing. His testimony was among the affidavit sent to Italy and several photographs of the scene of the crime had also been forwarded.

The letter just received by Prosecutor Florance was forwarded from the office of Governor Fielder, by whom it was received from the State Department at Washington. It bore date of September 22 and set forth that Quinn’s trial took place on July 9 last.

A remarkable feature of the communication was the statement that the Quinn case is the fifth case within the past twelve months in which Italians, tried in Italian courts for murders alleged to have been committed in the United States, have been found not guilty by the Jury and set at liberty by the courts. Not & case has been reported to the American Embassy within the past year in which a conviction for murder or manslaughter has been secured by the Royal Prosecutor.

The treaty laws between the United States and Italy are such that It is impossible for this country to secure the extradition of men arrested in Italy for murders committed in the United States, and the disadvantage resulting to the Interests of justice seem to be amply set forth In the communication referred) to above.