This Day in History: May 6 1914

Yellow stripe on a sewer grate

Voters Clear the Track For Greater Milltown by Balloting For Sewer and Water Systems Gratifying Results of Election

Expected to Prove a Great Boon to the Tire Town and Pave the Way to Michelin Co.’s Expansion.


MILLTOWN. May 6 – Two-thirds of the voters of the borough of Milltown turned out at the special election which was held yesterday, about 75 per cent, of whom voiced their approval of the action of the officials to proceed with the Installation of sewer and water systems in accordance with the plans and specifications of the Milltown Sewer and Water Commission, as approved by the Borough Council.

Special ballots were voted for the construction of a sewer system and the issuance of bonds therefor and the – construction of a water works and the issuance of bonds therefor, the results of which follow:

In favor of the construction of a system of sewerage in the borough of Milltown, according to resolution of council dated December 11, 1913……..192

In favor of the issue of bonds for the above, according to resolution of Council dated March 12, 1914……..183

Against the construction of a system of sewerage in the borough of Milltown……..49

Against the issue of bonds for sewer system……..46

In favor of the construction of a system of water works in the borough of Milltown, according a resolution of Council dated December 11, 1913……..188

In favor of the issue of bonds for the water works, according to a resolution of Council dated March 12, 1914……..181

Against the construction of a system of water works in the borough of Milltown, according to resolution of Council dated December 11, 1913……..47

Against the issue of bonds according to resolution of Council dated March 12, 1914……..43

There were 247 votes cast in all; of this number 16 were rejected.

After the installation of the sewers we will have not only a more attractive borough by way of conveniences, but a cleaner, healthier and up-to date borough.

While It will be necessary to bond the town for about $100,000 in order to establish the sewer and water systems as outlined by the plans and specifications, it Is believed that the same will not prove to be a heavy burden, compared with the conveniences that will be derived from the same. After the installation of the sewers we will have not only a more attractive borough by way of conveniences, but a cleaner, healthier and up-to date borough. This will also give Milltown better facilities for fire protection and have a tendency to reduce the insurance rates.

The vote cast yesterday was much heavier than had been anticipated, and a larger number turned out in favor of the plans than was looked forward to. In certain sections of the borough, where it was thought the vote would be dead against the new issue, a large proportion favored the movement.

All the Milltown voters employed in the Michelin tire factory were privileged to leave their work at 5o’clock yesterday in order to go to the polls to cast their votes.

The new systems after being installed, “It is believed, will have a direct bearing on the future plans of the Michelin Tire Company in the way of still further enlargements of their already enormous plant here, and thus Milltown will benefit in this way by bringing more people into the borough.


This Day in History: May 4th 1914

This Day in History: May 4th 1914

Tomorrow’s Election Is Most Important in History of the Borough

Milltown’s Future Depends Upon It Michelin Co. to Build Reclaiming Works if Water and Sewer Systems Are Voted For.


MILLTOWN, May 4. – May 6, is “Decision Day” in Milltown, when the voters will decide whether or not they want the proposed water and sewerage systems. Arguments have been heard for and against the proposition.

The principle arguments against are these:

  1. The Increased tax rate.
  2. The discomfort of making Improvements, such as torn up streets, etc.
  3. Annexation with the New Brunswick sewer system.
  4. The probable pollution of private wells now in use.
  5. The size of the main which will carry the sewage from Milltown to New Brunswick.

These arguments are answered by those favorable to the plans In this manner:

  • A town never begins to grow until it is bonded. The total bonded Indebtedness will amount to approximately $100,000. The interest on this plus the cost of the establishment of a sinking fund plus the cost of operation of the system, will amount to approximately between $8,000 and $9,000 annually, which cannot be claimed to be excessive in a town of one million dollars valuation. In the last ten years this valuation has Increased from five hundred thousand dollars valuation. In the next ten years, with added advantages of sewer and water the valuation should Increase in proportion. Besides this the water system should be a paying proposition by 1918, and undoubtedly will be.
  • Contracts awarded for these systems will embrace a clause requiring that the streets be returned to the same condition as when opened, and before final payments the borough councilmen will satisfy themselves on the condition of the thoroughness.
  • The annexation with New Brunswick brings with it $12,500 form the treasury of that city for the construction of the force line from the borough limits to New Brunswick., curtailing the cost of an expensive disposal plant on the banks of the Lawrence Brook. Our acceptance of this offer from New Brunswick does not place us under any obligations to that city, being but a purely business proposition for the protection of their water supply.
  •  With the clay and sandy soil, which proves to be an excellent filter, it is unlikely and improbable that the wells will be polluted, the small amount of sewage which escapes from the pipe cemented together, and plastered manholes, will become purified in a flow of a few feet in that nature of the soil.
  • Three engineers of note have declared that a twelve inch main, will carry all the sewage from Milltown, if there was a house on every lot in the borough, which should be satisfactory to those skeptical on this point. Many arguments have been advanced in favor of the plans, among them are
    • Encouragement for industries.
    • Increase of population.
    • Cleanliness
    • Domestic uses.
    • To place the town on higher level with towns of the same size and population.
  • Fire facilities.

What has Milltown to offer at the present time to new industries? Practically nothing but land and railroad facilities. One of the principal needs of any large industry is water and a place to dispose of the sewage. The Michelin Tire Company is at the present time severely handicapped in its growth by the lack of these facilities. The State Board of Health is decidedly against any addition pollution of the brook by the company, which is necessarily put an end to the plans of the building of a re-claiming plant, which it is understood the company will build upon the advent of water and sewerage systems, thereby greatly increasing the size of their plant in America.  

What has Milltown to offer at the present time to new industries? Practically nothing but land and railroad facilities. One of the principal needs of any large industry is water and a place to dispose of the sewage.

Why is it that Highland Park has increased in population during the last few years? Why is it that so many employed in Milltown who have their interests here have moved from New Brunswick to Highland Park and not from New Brunswick to Milltown. Because the facilities for modern improvements in modern homes fall short in that the borough has no water or sewers.

Upon the installation of a sewer system there will be a remedy for odors incidental to the distribution of sewerage on land and the other ills incidental to the lack of a system.

The slogan of the housewife tomorrow will be “Down with the rain barrel and in with the clear running water from the faucet.” Man can figure on saving his wife one-half her trouble by the installation of the pipe line and a receptive for the sewerage.

To compete with surrounding towns as a place for industry or a place for residence Milltown must sewer. New Brunswick is well sewered, as are South River, Metuchen, Highland Park and other surrounding towns Milltown must grow.

Milltown has a fire department of volunteers that is capable of fighting any fire. It Is equipped with a chemical auto truck which has done excellent work in small fires, but the company is seriously handicapped by the lack of pressure and lack of water, and it is likely that every fireman realizes it and those in the department who will be against it will be in the minority. The decision on its arguments advanced will be rendered by Milltown voters tomorrow.

The increase in the tax rate will be about 50 points, but this will be more than offset by the increased valuations. It is stated that the plan; Is not to pay off any bonded Indebtedness for five years, except Interest, so that property owners can connect with the systems without increasing their expenses too much.


This Day in History: April 28 1920

person dropping paper on box

ANNEXATION IS DEFEATED BY MILLTOWN VOTERS


MILLTOWN, Apr. 28 The proposal for annexation of a portion of North Brunswick Township by the Borough of Milltown was defeated in a special election held here yesterday.

There was a total of 122 votes cast for annexation and 183 votes against the proposition. The majority against was 61. The first voting precinct, which is in South Milltown, registered 17 votes for and 89 against annexation, while the second voting precinct, located in North Milltown, which section is adjacent to the territory which it was proposed to annex, gave 105 votes in favor and 94 votes against annexation. The annexation proposal was fought largely on the contention that it would mean increased taxation. It was the first big project backed by the Milltown Chamber of Commerce, the leaders of which worked energetically to secure Its adoption. This evening will witness the first annual banquet of the Chamber of Commerce, to be held in Red Men’s Hall, at 6.30 o’clock. A fine program has been arranged, and the principal speaker will be Adrain Lvon of Perth Amboy.


This Day In History: April 14, 1917

This Day In History: April 14, 1917

MILLTOWN MAYOR, DIES SUDDENLY


W. KUHLTHAU, JR., MILLTOWN MAYOR, DIES SUDDENLY

Milltown April, 14 – A shadow of gloom was cast over the borough of Milltown last night when the news of the death of Mayor William Kuhlthau, Jr., was announced. While the Mayor had been ill and confined to his home for the past month or so, his many friends had hopes for his recover, and the news of his demise comes as a shock to the community. For the past year Mayor Kuhlthau had complained more or less of his condition, but he had not taken the matter as being at all serious until about two months ago when he was compelled to relinquish his active duties with a view of regaining his health.

…he had not taken the matter as being at all serious until about two months ago when he was compelled to relinquish his active duties with a view of regaining his health.

The Daily Home News 1917

While his heart was affected other complications set in that hastened his departure from this world.

Only yesterday the Mayor was able to sit on his porch of his home, getting some fresh air and was making preparations to take an automobile trip to-day to Long Island to see his sister, he is believing that the country might be an aid in his recovery.

Later in the day his condition became more serious, however and despite the best medical aid that could be obtained he was call to his reward.

Mayor Kuhlthau was a man of sterling qualities whose presence will greatly be missed by his official colleagues and so many other friends in town, of New Brunswick and vicinity. He was 48 years of age, he leaves a wife, Mrs. Josephine Kuhlthau; a son Russell; mother and father. Mr. and Mrs. William Kuhlthau, Sr., of Milltown; a brother, Charles Kuhlthau, of New Brunswick, and a sister, Mrs. Joseph M DeHart, of Morris Park, L.I. to mourn their loss.

The funeral will be held on Monday afternoon. Internment will take place in Van Liew Cemetery under the direction of Undertaker Quackenboss.

William Kuhlthau, Jr. had served the Republicans of Milltown as their county committeeman for a long time and he came to the rescue of the party by consenting to accept the mayorship in 1914 when the political situation was very unique, the Republican, the Democrats nor the Progressives at that time being enthusiastic over the honor or labor attached with the Mayorship as the responsibility of the sewer and water problems which were in early stages at that time would fall upon the Mayor and Council. In the capacity of County committeeman at that time, Mr. Kuhlthau being unable to secure any other candidate took the reins in his own hands by accepting the nomination and under his administration the work (which was planned by the late Conrad Richter and his subordinates) was carried to a successful completion.

…he came to the rescue of the party by consenting to accept the Mayorship in 1914 when the political situation was very unique, the Republican, the Democrats nor the Progressives at that time being enthusiastic over the honor or labor attached with the Mayorship as the responsibility of the sewer and water problems which were in early stages at that time would fall upon the Mayor and Council…

The Daily Home News 1917

Mr. Kuhlthau was a business partner of Henry E. Lins, conducting their business at 58-60 Dennis Street. New Brunswick, under the firm name Kuhlthau & Lins.

While the Mayor accomplished a great deal in the town government, there were two suggestions in his message to council, ever upmost in his mind, which he did not live to see fulfilled, namely, more adequate fire alarm system and better heating system for the council chamber and fire department.

…he did not live to see fulfilled, namely, more adequate fire alarm system and better heating system for the council chamber and fire department.

The Daily Home News 1917

This Day In History: April 13, 1919

This Day In History: April 13, 1919

HOW MILLTOWN COULD BE TRANSFORMED: SUGGESTION THAT IT BE MADE TO REPRESENT “A LITTLE BIT OF FRANCE TRANSPLANTED TO AMERICA”

(By HELEN McCALLUM)


Ever since the time General Lafayette came across the ocean with his army and held out a helping hand to America in Revolutionary days, there has been a bond of friendship between America and France and it has been doubly, yes trebly cemented by the events of the recent war.

One of the results of this is bound to be an interchange of ideas, customs and manners between French and American people. It is shown already in many ways; our “doughboys” returning from France tell us in glowing phrases of the beauty of the French villages and cities – those that escaped the fury of the enemy – while many who have been abroad before and seen the pretty communities that have been devastated. Find no words to express their regret that such beauty should be lost.

People who have been in France say that Milltown possesses the natural physical elements that go to make up these cozy French towns and this idea suggests the possibility of converting New Brunswick’s suburb into a really and truly villa patterned after the best in France.

People who have been in France say that Milltown possesses the natural physical elements that go to make up these cozy French towns

Hellen mccallum -1919

There are a number of French families in Milltown now; there are French people coming to America constantly who would be attracted to a place that suggested home to them. Needless to say these people would probably be only too glad to keep up the idea of combining their efforts to inoculate France beautiful into New Jersey.

Milltown can afford to grow, to expand. The opportunities and possibilities are there and perhaps this plan is just the incentive needed to start the wheels of progress turning” towards a big destiny. There are hundreds of ways this could be done. Start a few civic features with the French idea predominating, follow this with French architecture for the houses, encourage French ideas in the  shows revamp the hotels with a French “menage” then watch Milltown grow!

Of course it would take time and some money, but with the natural advantages already there, these would he a secondary and third consideration in comparison to the investment for the future. Think of the towns that have no foundation to build a distinctive reputation on, then of the splendid one Milltown has to achieve an international reputation if a little initiative and effort are used to establish a French “atmosphere” there.

The Michelin Tire factory has an opportunity to expand, to treble or quadruple its present capacity through the adoption of this idea. Then, too, other industries would be attracted to the place and the first thing you know instead of running over to Paris for their season’s wardrobe, New Yorkers might be taking a Gray bus or trolley to Milltown for the same purpose.

Yes, Milltown (I think I’d change that name perhaps I’d call it “Michelin”) might endearingly be referred to as a “bit of France transplanted to America.”

Slight alterations to many of the homes would give them much of the sought French effect. A little touch here and there would do the trick.

Slight alterations to many of the homes would give them much of the sought French effec

Hellen mccallum -1919

It would be a good thing for the other Milltown industries as well as the Michelin. a good thing for the stores and shops and I would not be surprised if the Raritan River Railroad would contribute liberally to the carrying out of the plan.

Milltown has a real French millinery with a French madame in charge now. Maybe she is to be a pioneer in a new field. There is room for the French and the other industrious folk there now to get along splendidly in Milltown and to greatly increase the size and attractiveness of the place. It is a very nice town now.


This Day In History: April 8, 1925

This Day In History: April 8, 1925

Fireworks Explode As Factory Burns; Milltown Alarmed


MILLTOWN, April 8. – Eureka firemen answered a still alarm to North Brunswick township yesterday afternoon when they responded to the fire at the Unexcelled fireworks plant on George’s Road. The explosions at the fireworks plant were very obvious and many, people were alarmed until they looked out of their windows and observed the valley of smoke that enveloped the atmosphere in that section. The firemen responded in record time and were at the grounds five minutes after the call was sounded. They centered their work on the outlying buildings, and saved many from explosions.