This Day in History: January 30th, 1911

This Day in History: January 30th, 1911

MILLTOWN IS AROUSED BY 3 REVELERS

New Brunswick Men Smash Windows and Heads and Defy the Entire Borough – Sent to Jail By Justice Headley.

MILLTOWN, Jan. 30.-A lively time was the result of a marathon race from New Brunswick to South River on Saturday night. Fred Stubblefeld, Harry Catheart, and Frank McCormick, of New Brunswick, after completing this distance in no-record time, decided to give Milltown the advantages of their presence on the return trip.

They had probably learned that the town supported no cops and as a result determined to paint the town red. Several hotels were visited and the men gradually warmed up to their duty. The windows of “Hotel Marguerite” disappeared from the sashes and this started the ball rolling.

An Innocent Frenchman, who made the startling discovery that he had musical ability, attempted a song and was immediately knocked unconscious by Stubblefeld.

MAYOR RICHTER ARRIVES ON THE SCENE.

Some one had notified Mayor Richter and Marshal Lins, and they appeared on the scene to keep the peace The Mayor expostulated with them for some time, and when the car came, bound for New Brunswick, the trio attempted to board it.

The presence of a dog, belonging to Engine Company No. 4, who had made the run with the men, was a drawback to the trip at that time. Conductor Dunlap refused to allow the dog on the car, at which one of the men made a pass at the conductor which was blocked by Jacob DeHart They were thrown off the car and Mayor Richter ordered their arrest.

JUDGE HEADLEY HOLDS COURT

Mayor Richter and Marshal Lins conducted the noisy trio to the office of Joseph A. Headley, justice of the peace. The Mayor made a complaint against them for disorderly conduct and the Justice, after hearing sides, imposed a fine of $10 or 5 days in the county jail on Stubblefeld and McCormick and a fine of $5 or 5 days in jail on Cathcart. The trio could not pay the fines and w committed to jail.

While drawing up the necessary papers McCormick and Stubble began to wreak their vengeance on Jacob DeHart, who was a witness of threats. Another charge was made by Jacob DeHart and John Richter who acted as witnesses. The result was ? days more for these two men.

Marshal Joseph Rupprecht was called and he linked McCormick and Cathcart together. Marshal Lins took care of Stubblefeld and the trip to New Brunswick was made. The dog was forced to follow the car

It is understood that a friend of the arrested men called on Mayor Richter yesterday morning and try to secure their release, but without success.

The people are asking today “Shall it be a borough fire department or a borough lockup?”

DEATH OF J. H. KUHLTHAU

MILLTOWN, Jan. 30-John H. Kuhlthau then passed away yesterday afternoon at 5.30 at the age of 54 years at his residence on North Main street, an illness extending for over two weeks. In this death the borough loses a respected citizen, who at all times was interested in the progress of the borough and took an active part in public affairs, serving as clerk of the school board for several years. He was lately interested in tile concrete blocks and the reinforced concrete business.

His genial nature earned him many friends, who will mirth his death. He is survived by his wife, and one daughter Mary, and one son Wilbur. His mother Mrs. Stella Kuhlthau, also survives him as well as one brother, Conrad, W. and two sisters, Mrs. Henry Kohlepp Mrs. Charles Snedeker.

Mr. Kuhlthau was recently reelected secretary of the Van Liew Cemetery association, a position he had held for a  number of years. He was also a member of the Milltown Kranken Heilfs Verein, also Wickatunk Tribe, Independent Order of Red Men, No. 135, and Charles L. Walters Council, No. 178, Jr. O. U. A. M.,

GERMAN REFORMED CHURCH MILLTOWN

Jan. 30.-A large congregation listened to the special music rendered by the choir of the German Reformed Church last evening. The vocal solos, duets, trios and choruses were much appreciated. George Christ, the organist, rendered several fine solos.

Rev. W. F. Barny, pastor of the church, made a few remarks relating to the history of the German and English hymns.

OTHER NOTES.

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Richter, Trenton, were borough visitors on Sunday.

The Woman’s Home Missionary Society of the M. E. Church will meet at the home of Mrs. Mary A Evans to-night.

COLORED “LADIES” SOON GOT HIS $100

Steve Botcher, of Milltown, Out for “Good Time,” is Relieved of $104 in Burnet Street Alley-Small Fortune Soon Gone.

Steve Botcher, of Milltown, is down to his last cent today, Saturday he had a roll of money amounting to $110, which he had accumulated through hard work during the last month, Saturday he det decided to come to this city [New Brunswick] for a good time.

Late Saturday night he got in tow with two colored women on Burnet street. The women lured him into a dark alley, and during the conversation between them Botcher’s pocket was piled of the $104. After securing the money the women ran down the street and escaped.

Now Botcher wishes he hadn’t decided to have a good time,


This day in History: January 26th, 1906

This day in History: January 26th, 1906

MILLTOWN’S ARMLESS WONDER AT WORK

He Hunts and Hoes, Fishes and Rows as Well as Men Who Have Arms.

MILLTOWN, Jan. 26 – Deprived of both arms forty-odd years ago, John Fox, of Milltown, has become so expert in the use of the hooks which are attached to the stumps of his arms that he does many things as well as many men who possess both arms. Fox always goes out gunning after rabbits as soon as the season opens. One of his arms was taken off below the elbow, and the other above the elbow in a graining machine In the old rubber shop at Milltown.

Fox as a gun fitted with a strap which holds the weapon in place to his shoulder. With one of his arms, he supports the gun so that he can aim it at the game, and the trigger is pulled by means of a string with his teeth. Fox was out the other day and had not been searching for rabbits more than half an hour before he shot one. He returned to Milltown and had the gun loaded again and set out for another rabbit.

The old man is now 72 years old. He is an ardent fisherman in season and also manages to scull a light boat with ease. He takes care of a garden at home and pulls a cultivator plow by means of the hooks. He is cheerful despite the deprivation of his hands.


This Day in History: January 25, 1913

This Day in History: January 25, 1913

COUNCIL ACCEPTS OFFICIALS BONDS

Special Meeting of Borough Council to Discuss Street Conditions-Want Street Commissioner-Engineer Schneider Wants Assessor’s Map.

MILLTOWN, Jan. 25.-A special meeting of the Borough Council was held in Borough Hall Thursday evening, Mayor Conrad Richter, Clerk R. A. Harkins, Borough Attorney Frederick Weigel., and Councilmen C. Bauries, H. Kuhlthau, G. Crabiel, B. Miller and A. Skewis being present.

The bonds of the collector and treasurer as well as bonds for all other officials were accepted by the Council.

The matter of the condition of the street In front of the car barn was discussed, and the Council ordered that in as much as the franchise with the Public Service provides that they (the Public Service) are to take care of the streets in front of their place, they would be ordered to do so.

Matter Left With Attorney.

The petition of the residents of Riva avenue relative to the concreting and curbing of the said avenue, was taken from the table and placed in the hands of Borough Attorney Weigel with instructions to proceed in the matter of drawing up an ordinance and specification for same as soon as possible in order to get work under way in the early spring. The street committee were authorized to purchase a horse and cart for the collection of garbage and general use in maintaining the streets.

While the Council are ready to receive bids for the collection of garbage at the same time they also are looking for a man that would act in the capacity of a general caretaker or overseer of the Borough whose duty it would be to take care of the cleaning of streets, collection of garbage, care of electric lights, etc.. Applications for which should be made to Mayor Richter. After careful consideration of expenditures. during the past year the Council seems to think it advisable to form a street cleaning department, which it is believed would be better for the people of the Borough, that it would be a great improvement over the present system, and at the same time more economical.

The Mayor was instructed to insert an advertisement in the Home News to the effect that all applications for this position should be made to him.

The appointment of a Street Commissioner for 1913, has been deferred until definite arrangements can be made.

Frederick Schneider, Borough Engineer, was present at the meeting and explained to the Mayor and Council the necessity of having an assessor’s or tax map made for the Borough, due to the fact that the legislative committee recently recommended a bill that all municipalities should have a tax map whereby the taxes could be levied more accurately. In this case, every piece of property would be sure to be taxed and the possibilities of omission would be slight.

The Council is not in a position to take any immediate action but the matter will receive careful consideration in the very near future.



Church Services at Milltown.

Dr. Morris will preach at both morning and evening services at the Methodist Church. His morning subject will be “The Cross Gives the True Estimate of Divine Love” and in the evening his subject will be “The Empty House.”

The Woman’s Home Missionary Society of this church will hold its regular monthly meeting at the home of Miss Etta Evans on Mon- day evening at 8 o’clock.

On Wednesday evening next a flinch party will be held in the lecture room under the auspices of the Epworth League. Everyone is invited to attend.

Services at the German Reformed Church will be as usual. In the afternoon Mr. Christ, assisted by members of the choir will give an organ recital in that church at 4 p. Prayer meeting in this church is held on Wednesday evening.


This Day in History: January 24, 1905

This Day in History: January 24, 1905

EIGHT YEAR OLD BOY DROWNED

Clarence Schaffer Went Through Ice While Skating at Milltown.

Clarence Schaffer, the eight-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Schaffer, of Milltown, was drowned in Lawrence Brook, near Millers’ creek, yesterday afternoon, about 4 o’clock, while skating. He and some boy friends had gone to the brook after school hours and Schaffer went out on the ice, while the other boys stayed on shore. The ice was weak, owing to recent thaws, and the boy fell in. His companions on shore were un- able to do anything for him, and the boy drowned before their eyes.

The boys carried the news to Kohlhepp’s Hotel. Bartender Denhardt and others searched for the boy for a long time and it was nearly 6 o’clock last night before. their efforts were rewarded and the body was brought ashore.

Coroner Quackenboss visited the scene of the accident and gave a permit for burial. The boy was a member of the Milltown M. E. Church, and of the Sunday School. He was a bright boy and his death will be a severe shock to many friends.

His death marks the first fatal skating accident of the season, although there have been several cases of people getting through the lee and being rescued.


This Day in History: January 23, 1914

This Day in History: January 23, 1914

EUREKA FIRE CO. BANQUET IS SET FOR FEBRUARY 21

MILLTOWN, Jan. 23-At a meeting of Eureka Fire Co. No. 1, of  Milltown, held in their rooms in the Borough Hall last evening, it was decided to hold their annual banquet on Saturday evening, Feb. 21.

The nomination of officers took place and in only one case is there opposition and that is for the fire patrol. Two men are to be elected, for this office and three names have been put on the ticket, as follows: Chris Jensen, Oscar Harkins and William Beecher.

Elwood Boyce was nominated for foreman, J. Milton Brindle for first assistant and Martin Mueller for second assistant.

Mayor William Kuhlthau, Jr., was re-nominated for the office of recording secretary and Edward V. Emmens for assistant recording secretary. Other nominees are, for financial secretary, Charles C. Richter; treasurer, C. W. Waddington, trustee, Adam Christ, and steward, John Christ.

The election will take place at the next regular meeting of the Department, Feb. 26th.

Entertainment Tonight.

Under the auspices of the official board of the Methodist church an entertainment will be held in the lecture room of that edifice tonight, which promises to be a very interesting one and for which the admission will be 15 cents for adults and 10 Cents for children. Miss Tyler, of Keyport, will entertain, and will be assisted by the local Camp Fire girls. who will present a scene from the “Childhood Days of Hiawatha” and will also render several selections.

Mr. Sayre Again in the Oyster Business

E. F. Sayre, the proprietor of the Hotel Marguerite, who about five years ago used to supply many families in the Borough with their oyster requirements, is again in the oyster business. He is serving his patrons with the most delicious Rockaway oysters and is also in a position to supply families and give prompt attention to orders for parties, etc. Mr. Sayre’s advertisement appears in today’s issue.

Other Milltown News.

Last night in the Crescent Quoit League, Messrs. Snedeker and Stelle. won five straight from Chas, Chris and Ted Snedeker, and three out of five from J. Crabiel and H. Moore. Ted Snedeker and Chas. Christ defeated Jensen and Junker, four out of five.

Tonight at Richter’s Park, the A.. A. A. will meet the Minta A. C. of South River, in a game of basketball and from present indications a lively contest will take place. Both teams will present strong lineups.

Choir to Give Musical Comedy. Members of the Methodist Church. choir are rehearsing for a musical comedy to be given in the church on Feb. 11th, entitled, “The Tale of the Hat.”The entertainment promises to be an interesting one. Miss relen Glock, choir leader, is coaching them.


This Day in History: December 22nd, 1920

This Day in History: December 22nd, 1920

BANK ROBBERS GET LIMIT SENTENCE WITHIN FEW HOURS AFTER CAPTURE AT MILLTOWN

Prosecutor Stricker Order Speedy Disposal of Case as Warning–Plead Guilty and Sent to State Prison -Other Charges Pending.


A new record was set for “Jersey Justice” yesterday afternoon when Frank “Sailor” Voorhees of this city and Walter Watson of Melrose, Mass. captured only fifteen hours earlier by a Milltown posse in an attempt to rob the First National Bank there were arraigned before Judge Pete F. Daly in the county court her and sentenced to serve from four years and eight months to seven years each in State Prison.

Following their arrest yesterday morning the men got in touch with Frank P. Coan of South Amboy their counsel, and after a conference with him they decided to plead guilty at once to the bank robbery charge Allegations were prepared by the Prosecutor’s office and were signed by the men.

A special call was sent to Assistant Prosecutor John A. Coan, who came here at once from South Amboy and at four o’clock yesterday afternoon Judge Daly held a special session of the county court, and the men were arraigned. Both men pleaded guilty, and the Assistant Prosecutor at once moved for sentence.

Counsel for the men. a brother of the Assistant Prosecutor, made a plea for mercy on their behalf. He admitted that both had previous records, but said that Voorhees had served a term In State prison before the war for assault and battery and on his release had at once enlisted voluntarily and had served with the fourth division in France.

Watson, he said, had served in the navy, and had been stationed off the French coast for over a year.

Driven from New Brunswick

Mr. Coan declared that Voorhees tried to go straight after his charge from the army and had earned a position at Camp Raritan. When some thefts occurrednear him, however, said his counsel, attempts were made to place the blame on him and things were made so comfortable for him that he went to New York.

Voorhees was unable to get work there, Mr. Coan said, and he fell into bad company, which resulted in his undoing, and the same was the case with Watson, who was serving a term at New Bedford, Mass., with Voorhees last July when they broke together.

Mr. Coan urged clemency in view of the fact that the men had pleaded guilty, without putting the county to the expense of a trial.

Disgrace to Uniform

There are certain crimes, caused sudden temptation, in which a previous war record can be considered in extenuation of the offense,” said Judge Daly. “But in a deliberate crime like this, it simply adds another crime to their account, that disgracing the uniform. There are too many men now who think that because they served during the war they are entitled to live without working, and they are a disgrace to the great majority of our glorious American boys who served.”

He said that the court always takes into consideration the fact that a man pleads guilty and does not add perjury to his other crime, but that Voorhees had been given every chance before he was sent to State prison the first time.

“Middlesex county has been remarkably free from crimes of this sort,” he continued. “There has Been only one burglary during my term on the bench. I feel that this is due largely to advertising the fact that this is not a safe county for criminals to ply their trade.

Judge Daly

“I will not impose a fine as well as imprisonment on these men, in view of their having pleaded guilty, but I can see no reason why I should not impose the limit sentence permitted by statute. The sentence of the law in each case is that they be confined at hard labor in the State Prison for a term not exceeding seven years and not less than four years and eight months.”



Mast Face Other Charges

This sentence by no means disposes of the cases, however. There are eight other indictments pending against Voorhees, and a detainer will be placed against him at Trenton Ind when his term expires he will be brought back here to face trial on the other charges.

He is also wanted in a number of other cities, and authorities there have been notified. Chief of Police Kiely, of Plainfield, was present in Court when the men were arraigned yesterday and stated that both are wanted in his city.

Prosecutor Joseph E. Stricke complimented the posse of Milltown citizens on their fine work in capturing the two men in the attempted bank robbery. He said they had rendered a real service to the county and to the State.

The quick disposal of the cases was arranged by him, he said, as a warning to burglars and other criminals in these troublous times that they will get short shift in Middlesex county, and he made it clear that the sentences Imposed yesterday are by no means the finish of the service

He declared that if the men had not pleaded guilty he had planned to call a special session of the grant Jury today to indict them and to put the men on trial on Monday or Tuesday.

Voorhees and Watson were returned to the county jail at once and are being carefully watched, as the authorities are taking no chances on losing them. They will have to be held here until Friday and then will be taken at once to Trenton.

Voorhees denied in conversation with attendants at the county jail that he had anything to do with the robberies that are charged against him here and said that the Milltown robbery was the only local affair with which he had been connected. It was stated, however, that he had admitted a robbery in Boston.

He expressed himself as being well satisfied with his sentence and said that he intended to serve all the time against him and then try to live straight.

The two men who were with Voorhees and Watson in the Milltown affair are still at large, but the detectives are working on this part of the case. Voorhees continued his denial that a woman had been in the party. The allegations signed by the men charged breaking and entering the bank building and stealing $1,000 in bonds. Bank officials said today that nothing had been stolen from the bank but that some bonds might have been taken from privately owned safe deposit boxes but that $1,000 would fully cover the loss.

“Sailor” Voorhees seemed quite peeved at being caught in a small town and said to an officer: “It beats the devil, we’ve pulled this stuff in all large cities and now we get grabbed in a jerk water town.” Night Watchman Herman Willenbrock of the Michelin plant, deserves considerable praise for his work.