This Day in History: August 11th 1916

This Day in History: August 11th 1916

Sewer Contract Goes to Brunswick Firm


MILLTOWN, Aug. 11. There being but one bid for the sewer and water extension out Riva avenue, in order that the new Michelin houses might be connected the contract was awarded to the Utility Construction Company, of New Brunswick, at the meeting of Borough Council last night The successful bidders gave bonds in the amount of $8.400 for the faithful performance of their duties. The contract specified that but one payment shall be made at the completion and acceptance of the work.

Utility Man Resigns.

The resignation of Henry Rathcamp, who has served the borough as utility man for the past several years, was received at the council meeting last night, and in accordance with action taken, an advertisement for man to take his place appears in today’s issue of the Home News.

The matter of procuring oil for the purpose of settling the dust along the main street of the borough was again discussed and the street committee was directed to procure some kind of a substance as soon as possible. Chairman Kuthlthau, of the street committee reported that he had investigated the matter of combination road binder and dust layer produced by the Robbinson Process Co. Whether this or crude oil will be procured was left in the hands of the committee to decide.

Poor Sidewalk

A washout in the sidewalk of O. Lindstrom. of North Main Street, which caused a young lady to fall down recently, was reported to council, and the clerk was authorized to notify the owner to have same repaired.

Councilman Skewis, chairman of the police committee, reported that he had been requested by the Board of Health to put a special officer on the streets to see that the resolutions of the health committee are carried out in so far as prohibiting children under sixteen years from entering or leaving the town, to keep children at home and to perform such other duties as the Board of Health will require of them. It is proposed to have the special officer to board the trolley cars as they enter the town and make a search for children under the age limit and prevent them from alighting in the town.

The matter of daily visits in the borough by New York and Brooklyn children who are stopping near Uatrick’s Corner, was reported. The matter will be taken care of by the special officer, who will be on the job this week.

The finance committee was authorized to purchase sixty-five meters still due on contract with the Pittsburgh Meter Co., together with 25 one-inch curb cocks and six frost bottoms for meters.

The application for plumbers’. scene and bond of Theodore Bluming, which was lald on the table some time ago, was taken up and refused, on the grounds that Mr. Bluming had no established place of business. Mr. Bluming desired to do some work in his own home at present and expected to start his business later on. The outside work has been completed by regularly licensed plumber, and the refusal of the application will not hinder him from doing the inside work in his own home, but it must be inspected by a licensed plumber of the borough.

A bond of the Michelin Tire Company for plumbing licenses was approved.

The clerk was Authorized to deliver to the engineer in charge of the new sewer and water construction work the bid of the Utility Construction Co. with the understanding the same would be returned for filing at the completion of the work

The finance committee was empowered to purchase an air compressor for the engine for use in connection with the sewer station at a cost of not more than $225.

The clerk was authorized to send a bill to the Pubic Service Railway Co., for $3,00, for water taken from a local hydrant to fill their tank car, and also to notify the Public Service that such practice will not be tolerated unless permission is granted by council.


This Day in History: August 7, 1913

This Day in History: August 7, 1913

Sayreville Man Hit by a Motorcyclist at Milltown


MILLTOWN, Aug. 1-Yesterday morning when Hans Popp and his assistant painters, who are at present engaged in painting the Borough Hall in Milltown, were alighting the trolley car near Fresh Ponds Road, when one of the assistants, a young man from Sayreville, was struck by a motorcycle and somewhat bruised about the incident.

Just about the time the painters alighted the car a wagon was bound up the street and a motorcycle was bound down, which together with the trolley car, bound for New Brunswick, caused a constipated state of affairs in which the passenger became entangled. The motorcyclist was obliged to return of his machine was somewhat damaged. The wounds of the passenger were taken care of by his friends.  


This Day in History: August 5th, 1911

This Day in History: August 5th, 1911

THIS IS MILLTOIWN’S BIG DAY

Parade, Picnic and Fireworks Will Help Celebrate the Arrival of Borough’s First Fire Apparatus- Boy Badly Burned.


MILLTOWN, Aug. 5. The day of great import to Milltown history has at last arrived and every resident from the ages of 5 to 90 will do honor to the firemen who take charge of the day.

Homes and public buildings are prettily decorated with the red, white and blue and the air of the town is one of gaiety. The borough hall is covered with flags and bunting and is a fit home for the borough first fire apparatus.

Picnic at Milltown Park.

The big picnic, which is staged at Milltown Park, begins at 3 o’clock, when Sheridan’s full orchestra plays for all who care to dance. On the adjoining grounds the Crescent A. C. are battling for supremacy over Spotswood and slump or no slump a Milltown team cannot lose today.

Parade Begins at 1 O’clock.

At 1 o’clock the firemen will meet at the borough hall to form the line parade. The line will be lead by the borough’s stalwart marshals followed by the Milltown Fife, Drum and Bugle Corps, which will reel off the tunes as never before. Then will come the Mayor, Council, and other borough officials In automobiles. Following these there will be the firemen and visiting firemen and last but not least the new apparatus which will be the cynosure of ail eyes.

Line of March.

The line of march will be from the Borough Hall on Main street to Church street, to Clay street, to Ford avenue, to Main street, to Booraem avenue, countermarch to Riva avenue, Riva avenue to grove.

When darkness has sufficiently covered the town a brilliant display of fireworks will be given at the grove. Great preparations have been made to accommodate the large crowd.

Mayor Richters’ Day.

This will be a great day for Mayor Conrad Richter, who has been the instrument in organizing a fire department and whose vigor has finally obtained fire protection for the borough. This is his day too.

Boy Badly Burned.

The four year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Lee, met with a painful accident last night at his home on Clay street. While passing a kerosene light on a table, his clothes caught on the table cover upsetting the lamp. In a twinkling he was In flames. His father was standing near and managed to quickly beat out the flames, but not before the son was badly burned,

The boy was removed to the hospital where it was said that he was in a critical condition. The damage to the room was slight.

Mrs. William G. Evans, Miss Pearl Evans, and Russell Evans have returned from a visit to Long Island.

Miss Alma Kuhlthau has returned from Troy, N. Y., where she has been entertained by friends.

Mrs. Charles Sevenhair returned home last evening after a visit with Mrs. Henry Dorn at Avon.

Dr. N. N. Forney has purchased a Reo touring car.

Mrs. S. E. Stelle, Miss May Evans Miss Mildred Stelle and Clarkson Stelle were Asbury Park visitors on Friday.

Miss Florence Snediker starts tomorrow for a visit with friends in New Haven.


This Day in History: August 3rd, 1911

This Day in History: August 3rd, 1911

FIRE APPARATUS FOR MILLTOWN

Will Be Exhibited at Fireman’s Picnic on August 5


MILLTOWN. Aug. 3. At 4 o’clock yesterday afternoon the new fire apparatus recently purchased by the borough from Boyd Brothers, of Philadelphia, for $4,100 arrived in the borough. On the truck was a chauffeur and representative of the firm and Mayor Conrad Richter, who, being anxious for fire protection in the borough, did much in bringing about the purchase of the truck.

The apparatus certainly made a fine appearance as it came through the borough yesterday. The body of the truck is red with yellow trimmings and on the front in large letters is the name of Milltown’s first fire company. On the truck are two chemical tanks, several feet of hose, extension ladders and hooks, which make a complete outfit.

The truck is propelled by motor power and is capable of making from 20 to 25 miles an hour. The body is set upon an autocar chassis. It is equipped with solid rubber tires.

The apparatus will be on exhibition on Saturday, August 5, when the firemen will hold their first grand picnic at Milltown Park. The day promises to be one of the greatest days of celebration in the history of the borough. The dancing will begin at the park at 3 p. m. and will continue until midnight. At 7 p. m. the officials of the borough. In automobiles, and the firemen will form a parade, preceded by the Milltown Fife, Drum and Bugle Corps. The line of march has not as yet been determined, but will include the principal streets of the borough.

But this- – pageant is not all. After dark there will be a grand display of fireworks at the park, which will attract many.

Saturday will be almost a holiday in the borough. It is thought that business places will close in the early afternoon in honor of the firemen. Houses will be gayly decorated with flags and bunting.

Complimentary tickets have been sent to the fire companies of New Brunswick and a record-breaking crowd is expected.


This Day in History: August 1st, 1910

This Day in History: August 1st, 1910

DECLARE CITIZEN HALTED JUSTICE / BOYS DELAY TRAIN

Exciting Scene When as Unlicensed Peddler is Protected From Justice by a Friend in Milltown.


MILLTOWN, Aug 1. The councilmen of the borough have a hard problem before them. How are they to enforce an ordinance that has been passed for a year when private citizens interfere? The councilmen for a long time have been trying to enforce an ordinance, protecting the merchants of the borough, providing for the licensing of peddlers. At the last regular meeting the council laid especial stress on the ordinance and determined to have it enforced. As a result several peddlers have been forced to procure licenses and one has been arrested for neglect of the law.

On Friday evening last, a peddler entered the town and went to several in the borough and sold goods without having a license. Councilman Rappleyea made a complaint before Justice Headley and as the man was near by the Justice ordered him to come to his office.

Before the man could get to the office a resident of the borough suddenly became very friendly with tie peddler and rushing over to the Justice demanded his freedom on the ground of being a friend. The man did not stop at that but threatened the Justice and called him vile names, the Justice says.

Mr. Headlev was very much taken back both by the friendship existing between the two men and by the orders given to him by a private citizen. As there was no constable on hand to take the. two men in hand, he determined that with odds as they were it was best to let matters rest, and to prevent a scene on the street, the” peddler was permitted to take the next car out of town. It is doubtful whether the man will again try by the influence of his friend to sell goods without a license as he seemed quite relieved to escape.

BOYS DELAY TRAIN.

Ernest Sohlosser and Harry Christ, boys of about five years of age, were playing on the high trestle of the Raritan River Railroad recently when a train came in sight. Whether the boys were frightened or intended to stop the train is not known, but they kept their positions and the engineer by quick work brought the train to a standstill and led the boys from their dangerous play ground.


This Day in History: July 21st, 1918

This Day in History: July 21st, 1918

RESIDENTS OF MILLTOWN BOROUGH HONOR THEIR SOLDIER BOYS BY THE NOVEL DISPLAY OF NAMES


To our neighbors in Milltown must go the credit for a unique and decidedly appropriate tribute to the men who have left there for service in the army and navy an honor roll of the names of the men placed on a board 10 feet high in a prominent part of the town.

The idea was “first suggested in the borough council by C. V. L. Booream and referred to the War Relief Council, who completed the plans that finally resulted in the dedication of the honor roll board on July 4th, the council financing it

The ceremony was most impressive. The board was draped with two very, large flags and at a given signal two girls drew them aside disclosing the names in clear letters that may easily .be read from some distance. Speeches were made by different ones, among them being Samuel Hoffman, one of the four-minute speakers in New Brunswick.

This tribute of Milltown to her departed soldiers is one that cannot help but appeal to everyone as being a fine expression of the sentiments of the “home folks.” It is an act that will be appreciated and remembered by these men who have offered their all to their country. The sign seems to say, just as plainly as if the words were written on it in huge letters: “These are men from Milltown who have gone to fight for us; we are proud of them and are standing back of them to the limit.”

Here are the names in the order in which they appear on the Milltown honor list:  


S. Bridier, C. Bordel, L. Bernard, J. Bourgarde, J. P. Saury, P. Barrere, H. Belin, J. Bernard, P. Bartherottte,  L. Bondee, S. Brickman, W. Barr, W. Bradley, H. J. Baier, C. Bluming, I. Bagoyne, P. Collins, Al. Christ, E. Collins, E. Chevalier, P. Cholet, T. Chardonnet, P. Coxie, R. Calledce, F. Cojean, E. Collet, L. Cannaff, F. Cretau, J. W: Dorn, J. P. Domas, L. Dheere, L. Decelle, M. David, L. Daviou, N. De Srnet, R. Evenou, F. Fleurant, M. Fichant, W. Galanias, J. Gaydier, C. Grand, L Corends. A. Grangemarre, H. Hartlander, C. Hartlander, G. Hartlander, M. Kulthau, C. M. Kulthau, L. LeGuillou. H. Okerson. J. Poigonec, G: Poigonec. F. Poupon, J. Magnet, J. Rupprecht, R . Rusellot, A. Renoux.

R. Richter, P. Schlumberger, P. Richards, Jr., P. Sheppard, C. Schwendeman, C. Villecourt, V. Troulakis, N. Suignard, A. Vauchez, N Van Voden. P. Ginelewet, J. Peflofky, G. Papas. Roy Reeves. R. Reeves, D. Romero, C. Syottonis, V. Van Canwenbuge, J. Genet, H. Fahrenholz, A. Anderson, J. P. Arvie, E. Gele, J. Gorgeon, R. Headley, J. Heimel, E. Jumet, M. Jegou, J. Kopetz, J. LeRoux, H. Meirose, S. Perry, Jr., J. Perry, L. Leroux, A. Pialoux, L. Mechan, A. J. Heim, J. Shea, N. Ropers, M. Queignec, E. Garde, R. Heimel, C Hughe, H. Kurmas, J. Kearborn, A. Lins, J. W. Lins, H. W. Lins, L. Mitton, W. Posekv, J. LaFaige, O. Haeg-ens, V. Laz, R. L. Walters, W. Wegant, J. Wegant, G. DeMontelleon, A. Dickinson, B. Christ, A. Wysems, G. Worthage, C. J. Weyde, A. Fabre, S. Farbat, Kupkrinski, F. Mather, N. Morzoraka, J. Poloski, J. Vandresitz, J. Zadusk, Ferdland R. Crabiel