This Day in History: August 9th, 1916

This Day in History: August 9th, 1916

JOE AUER IS BOY HERO AT MILLTOWN

Charged With Swimming in Lawrence Brook, He Refuses to Give Names of Other Boy Swimmers


MILLTOWN AUG 9.- Joseph Auer, 15 years of age, of this place was arranged before Justice of the Peace Joseph Headley last night on a charge of swimming in Lawrence Brook, the New Brunswick Watershed. The boy was released with a reprimand after a bearing which created more than the usual attention among Milltown people. More than 200 Milltowners attended the bearing, and several, including Harry Meyers, the principal of the Milltown schools, appeared in the boy’s behalf. Auer graduated from the Milltown public school last June and was first honor pupil. The complaint against the youngster was made by Charles Joris superintendent of the New Brunswick Water Department, but there was not sufficient evidence on hand to secure a conviction.

On Monday night the Amer boy was found on the bank of Lawrence Brook with his clothes off by one of the watershed inspectors. In the opinion of the Justice who beard the case this was not sufficient evidence to prove the boy had been swimming in the brook. Accordingly, be was released with a reprimand.

 For one time it has been believed that Milltown youngsters have been swimming various parts of the watershed, which furnishes the drinking water in New Brunswick, and the inspectors have been vigilant. The complaint against Auer, it is believed was made in the hope that he would

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give the names of the boys who have been making habit of swimming in places against the orders of the City of New Brunswick “Squealing” on one another is detested by the boys, and Auer absolutely refused to give the names of any of the boys who have been Swimming in the brook He was willing to take the consequences himself rather than being freed of the charge if he would give the names of the boys in the minds of many Milltown boys, Joseph is a real hero.

Swimming in the Milltown pond is not an unheard-of occurrence, either I is said. It is not done openly. but some young men have made practice of falling out of Towboats into the cooling waters with all their clothes on. Many of these happenings are accidental. On Monday night a young lady of the borough was seen to suddenly fall out of towboat. Instead of being alarmed for her safety, she seemed to enjoy the splash, though – fully attired.


This Day in History: July 21st, 1918

This Day in History: July 21st, 1918

RESIDENTS OF MILLTOWN BOROUGH HONOR THEIR SOLDIER BOYS BY THE NOVEL DISPLAY OF NAMES


To our neighbors in Milltown must go the credit for a unique and decidedly appropriate tribute to the men who have left there for service in the army and navy an honor roll of the names of the men placed on a board 10 feet high in a prominent part of the town.

The idea was “first suggested in the borough council by C. V. L. Booream and referred to the War Relief Council, who completed the plans that finally resulted in the dedication of the honor roll board on July 4th, the council financing it

The ceremony was most impressive. The board was draped with two very, large flags and at a given signal two girls drew them aside disclosing the names in clear letters that may easily .be read from some distance. Speeches were made by different ones, among them being Samuel Hoffman, one of the four-minute speakers in New Brunswick.

This tribute of Milltown to her departed soldiers is one that cannot help but appeal to everyone as being a fine expression of the sentiments of the “home folks.” It is an act that will be appreciated and remembered by these men who have offered their all to their country. The sign seems to say, just as plainly as if the words were written on it in huge letters: “These are men from Milltown who have gone to fight for us; we are proud of them and are standing back of them to the limit.”

Here are the names in the order in which they appear on the Milltown honor list:  


S. Bridier, C. Bordel, L. Bernard, J. Bourgarde, J. P. Saury, P. Barrere, H. Belin, J. Bernard, P. Bartherottte,  L. Bondee, S. Brickman, W. Barr, W. Bradley, H. J. Baier, C. Bluming, I. Bagoyne, P. Collins, Al. Christ, E. Collins, E. Chevalier, P. Cholet, T. Chardonnet, P. Coxie, R. Calledce, F. Cojean, E. Collet, L. Cannaff, F. Cretau, J. W: Dorn, J. P. Domas, L. Dheere, L. Decelle, M. David, L. Daviou, N. De Srnet, R. Evenou, F. Fleurant, M. Fichant, W. Galanias, J. Gaydier, C. Grand, L Corends. A. Grangemarre, H. Hartlander, C. Hartlander, G. Hartlander, M. Kulthau, C. M. Kulthau, L. LeGuillou. H. Okerson. J. Poigonec, G: Poigonec. F. Poupon, J. Magnet, J. Rupprecht, R . Rusellot, A. Renoux.

R. Richter, P. Schlumberger, P. Richards, Jr., P. Sheppard, C. Schwendeman, C. Villecourt, V. Troulakis, N. Suignard, A. Vauchez, N Van Voden. P. Ginelewet, J. Peflofky, G. Papas. Roy Reeves. R. Reeves, D. Romero, C. Syottonis, V. Van Canwenbuge, J. Genet, H. Fahrenholz, A. Anderson, J. P. Arvie, E. Gele, J. Gorgeon, R. Headley, J. Heimel, E. Jumet, M. Jegou, J. Kopetz, J. LeRoux, H. Meirose, S. Perry, Jr., J. Perry, L. Leroux, A. Pialoux, L. Mechan, A. J. Heim, J. Shea, N. Ropers, M. Queignec, E. Garde, R. Heimel, C Hughe, H. Kurmas, J. Kearborn, A. Lins, J. W. Lins, H. W. Lins, L. Mitton, W. Posekv, J. LaFaige, O. Haeg-ens, V. Laz, R. L. Walters, W. Wegant, J. Wegant, G. DeMontelleon, A. Dickinson, B. Christ, A. Wysems, G. Worthage, C. J. Weyde, A. Fabre, S. Farbat, Kupkrinski, F. Mather, N. Morzoraka, J. Poloski, J. Vandresitz, J. Zadusk, Ferdland R. Crabiel


This Day in History: July 14th, 1919

This Day in History: July 14th, 1919

MILLTOWN, July 14. Tonight is the time set to fittingly observe the independence of France In the borough when the French national holiday will be duly celebrated with a splendid program.

A street parade at 7 o’clock in which the war veterans of France will take a most prominent part, the local Red Cross of which every member Is asked to be In line with their usual costumes, the French school children and various other organizations along with the Michelin band will make up the line.

After the parade a patriotic meeting will be held at the Michelin Park at which Judge Peter F. Daly will speak, and Capt. Charles Reed, who was severely wounded in France, will give a description of the army life. Other numbers are on the program and the climax of the anniversary program will be a block dance on the ball diamond. This ought to be a splendid affair and everyone should turn out to celebrate the occasion.

Chamber of Commerce

Wednesday night is the regular meeting night of the Chamber of Commerce and arrangements have been completed to make this an unusually attractive meeting. The New Brunswick Sunday Times yesterday gave a fine description of the character and quality possessed for public speaking of the man who will address the meeting on Wednesday evening and all members, along with those who would like to join and citizens in general, are invited to come out and hear the good news that will come to the new borough developing body.

Off for Sea Girt

Elburn Matlack and Harold Glines of this place, left Saturday for Sea Girt, where they will train with the state militia men. both of the local men are members of Co. E of New Brunswick, and the trip down was made in Mr. Matlack’s car.

Arthur Foss, who has seen much thrilling war service in France, is spending a few days with his uncle. John Klotzbach, having arrived last week from overseas.

Installation of Officers

On Thursday evening of this week the installation of the newly elected officers will be held at the Daughters of Liberty lodge room and all members are asked to be present

Parade at 7 P.M.

The French Independence Day parade and celebration will take place promptly at 7 o’clock, and it is the desire of the committee to have a large representation of Milltown citizens In line two or three local organizations will march in a body, but the citizens at large are cordially invited to be on hand and to parade.

The local Red Men have planned to march in a body, and everybody is earnestly requested to meet at the clubhouse promptly at 6.45 o’clock.

Developing and printing for armatures done at Moore’s Drug Store All work guaranteed. Twenty-four hour service. Films and cameras on sale Moore s Drug Store. Red Men’s Building.

This day in History: March 4, 1924

This day in History: March 4, 1924

MILLTOWN’S NEW FIRE SIREN WILL BE TESTED TONIGHT


Milltown. March 4, — Tonight between the hours of 5 o’clock and 10 o’clock people may expect a loud shrill gong. Fire Chief H. A. Christ advises that none should be alarmed as it will be only a test of the new fire siren. Which is here for a period of thirty days for a test. The siren was Installed yesterday and while the exact time of the test is not known, the chief wanted the people to be on the “inside” as he did not want any frightened especially those living In the district of the alarm. The siren has been installed at the disposal plant. It has not been definitely decided as to what arrangement will be made regarding the new alarm which will be installed this year, but if the test tonight of the siren proves what it is expected to, it will undoubtedly be the one adopted. Rapid progress is being made by the Eureka firemen to have everything in first class working order and a good alarm system has been lacking here for years.


This day in History: Feb. 17, 1916

This day in History: Feb. 17, 1916

The Interesting History of The Pneumatic Tire, Which Dates Way Back to 1845

(By R. B. Bramwell.)


In reply to the request of the Home News the writer takes pleasure In writing an authoritative sketch of the pneumatic tire, going away back to 1846 when the pneumatic principle was first adapted experimentally to the wheels of road vehicles, and taking up the story again forty-three, years later, when the development of the safety bicycle revived an interest in a tire more resilient than the ordinary solid rubber tire of that period, and contributing to a later era when the pneumatic was first applied to automobiles.

The story is a romantic tale, like so many stories of the early struggles of the pioneers, whether they be adventurers for adventure’s sake, or pioneers cast In the more practical mold of Industrial discovery and Invention.

Furthermore the story of the pneumatic tire is of particular interest to New Brunswick readers, as one of the pioneers in this field whose visiou many years ago foresaw the great Importance of the pneumatic tire, and who after many reverses founded In Prance the great Industry that bears his name, has for eight years been quietly building up another great tire making factory In Milltown, our thriving neighbor to the south.

In the summer of 1913 the writer made a careful study of the early history of the pneumatic tire, and lotted down much Interesting data taken from many works of reference’, and from old flies of foreign newspapers and magazines, besides running across certain interesting exhibits in the South Kensington museum in London.

The pneumatic tire had Its origin In England, and Its birth certificate will be found in the patent registered on December 10, 1845, by R. W. Thomson. He describes it as a means of “perfecting the wheels of carriages and other rolling bodies.” Turning to the actual text of the patent we find a fuller description as follows: “The nature of my said invention consists in the application of elastic bearings round the tires of the wheels of carriages for the purpose of lessening the power required to draw the carriages, rendering their motion easier, and diminishing the noise they make then in motion.

I prefer employing for the purpose a hollow belt composed of some air and water-tight material, such as caoutchouc or gutta percha, and inflating it with air, whereby the wheels will in every part of their revolution present a cushion of air to the ground or rail or track on which they run.”

First Tried on Carriages

The invention was naturally first tried on carriages, and in the “Mechanics’ Magazine,” Nos. 1,235 and 1,239 of April and May, 147 Nearly seventy years ago we find the following announcement.

“Messrs. Whltohurst & Co., coach builders, have acquired from Mr. Thomson, the patentee of aerial wheels, the rights for applying them to all kinds of vehicles. These wheels give to carriages a gentleness of motion absolutely impossible to obtain by any sort of spring; they effectually deaden all noise from the wheels; they prevent bumping and shaking, and render traction considerably more easily than with ordinary wheels, especially on bad roads.”

We have seen that Thomson invented the pneumatic tire in 145, but we find that it fell into such complete oblivion that the Irish veterinarian, Dunlop, might well have thought that he discovered the Pneumatic principal when in 1888 he first applied his single tube tire to a bicycle.

Early Tires Not Detachable.

But the early pneumatic bicycle tire introduced by Dunlop was far from being perfect; its worst fault was that It was not detachable, so that with the first puncture it was done for and had to be torn from the rim and replaced. Numerous experiments were made by different makers, but the first practical pneumatic tire put on the market, a tire that was easily detached on the road by the rider, was made by Michelin, a large rubber goods manufacturer of France who had been in business since 1832. It was thus that Michelin earned the tittle in France of “Pere des Demintables” – father of

In 1894, Michelin tires reached their definitive and final form, the same as are used today by both bicycles and cars.  

Michelin not only perfected the bicycle tire but was also the pioneer in the application of the pneumatic to horse vehicles and automobiles. He felt that having proved its worth in the service of bicycles, his tire was capable of bigger things and believed he might succeed where Thomson had failed.

His first attack was made on the Paris cabs. On February 10, 1896, the first cab to be fitted with pneumatic tires was sent out, and so great was the added comfort, that by 1903 there were as many as 4,500 cabs in Paris using pneumatic tires, and today it is a rare thing to see one without them.

Auto Makers Shy at First.

Still Michelin was not satisfied; he sought still other conquests, and his greatest victory was in widening the scope of the pneumatic tire by applying it to motor care. But wonderful as was his conception, certain as seemed the advancement it was bound to give to the growing industry of motor car building, it shared the lot of all great discoveries— discouragement and apparent failure.

No manufacturer would risk his car by fitting it with such apparently frail tires, but Michelin did not lose confidence: he was certain of ultimate success, and in order to give a public demonstration as to what his tires could do be had to build a car for himself. The occasion was the historic Paris-Bordeaux race of 1896 when Michelin was represented by a rough sort of motor car made at his own works at Clermont-Ferrand. His triumph was complete.

From that day the progress of the pneumatic tire was coincident with the development of the motor car Itself. The story Is too well known to need repeating. Inventors the world over have worked for years to improve the old Paris-Bordeaux type of tires, and while many Improvements In details have been made, the principles laid down in 1895 remain unchanged.

One of the most recent advances In tire design has been the new rubber nonskid Just being introduced by the Michelin Company at Milltown. The French Michelin factory brought out the first pneumatic tire for automobile, but It remained for the Milltown organization to produce the latest type of tire, the new Universal Tread. This fact Is surely well calculated to develop a feeling of local pride in the minds of New Brunswick citizens.


This day in History: Feb. 12, 1924

This day in History: Feb. 12, 1924

AUTO GAS IS FATAL TO MILLTOWNER

Body of Jules De Smet Found Under His Car In Garage

WAS AT WORK IN CLOSED BUILDING


MILLTOWN, Feb. 12.—Overcome by automobile gas, Jules De Smet of 78 Clay street, this place, was found dead in a garage owned by Adam Heyl of Ford avenue yesterday afternoon at 4 o’clock. Discovery of the body was made by Fred Heyl, a school boy.

De Smet, who kept his Chevrolet car in the garage, was expected to take his usual place in the Michelin  Tire Company at the 3:30 shift in the afternoon. After he had failed to put in an appearance, the foreman of the department sent a messenger to his home to ascertain if he was sick. The messenger reported that no one was at home, whereupon Mrs. De Smet, who also is employed by the company, was advised, of her husband’s absence and left the plant to investigate. she had been gone but a few minutes when the Heyl boy met her and related that her husband was dead under his car in the garage. The woman rushed back to  the Michelin plant lor help. Arriving there she fell grief stricken and was put in care of a nurse.

Superintendent H. R. B. Meyers sent A. L. P. Kuhlthau, the company’s handy man in medical requirements, to investigate and in the meantime asked for assistance from St. Peter’s Hospital and Dr* Hay wood was soon on his way, as well as the ambulance. Mr. Kuhlthau had verified the boy’s statement that life was extinct. Coroner Hubhard was notified and after giving a permit for the removal of the body stated that death had come about an hour before the discovery of the body. A pet dog was found dead in a corner of the garage.

Mr. De Smet apparently had started to make repairs of some kind. The garage was tightly closed and exhaust gas was the direct cause of his sudden death. All attempts to revive him proved futile. The victim was well known and well liked.