This Day in History: January 27th, 1919

This Day in History: January 27th, 1919

STORAGE OF CITY WATER INCREASED BY CONCRETE DAM

The concrete arch dam for the city water supply has been completed and is now ready to be put into service so the supply of stored water will be largely increased. The dam is located six hundred feet above the old dam and is built in the form of an arch spanning the mill pond from bank to bank. The spillway of the new dam is two hundred feet in length which is forty-six feet longer than the spillway of the old dam. The new dam will raise the water behind it four and a half feet higher than the previous level of the pond and will back the water as far as the dam at Milltown. The water in the new pond will overflow forty acres in addition to the area now covered. most of which is located between. Ryder’s Lane and Milltown. The amount of water which was available in the old pond which could be drawn to a depth of five feet below the dam was 87 million gallons. The new dam will add 146 million gallons to the capacity of the pond so there will be an available storage in the Weston’s Mill pond of 233 million. gallons.

The dam is built in the form of an arch. This form where the site is suitable makes it possible to build a dam with greater strength with much. less material than the form of dam which depends on the weight of the structure only to resist the water pressure. The older type of dam usually has a factor of safety of two while the arch dam which has been constructed has a factor of safety of ten. An unusual feature of the dam was that it was constructed in the water of the pond which was over eighteen feet deep and which could not be drained on account of having to maintain the city water supply during the construction of the dam. The construction under these difficult conditions was carried on by building the dam in twenty-five sections which were surrounded by a tight cofferdam of steel sheet piling.

Concrete Poured in Movable Forms.

After pumping out the cofferdam the concrete was poured in movable forms which were used for the whole. structure.

The dam has a spillway with. a length of 200 feet which is held by abutments of twenty-five and thirty feet in length at the two banks. The j dam rests on the solid shale rock and the abutments reach to the shale in each bank. The crest of the dam is three feet wide and the base is nine) feet wide. The height of the dam in the pond is twenty-three feet. The normal difference of water level above and below the dam is four and a half feet but the structure is designed to hold the water for the full height of the dam if the water in the lower pond is entirely drained.

In fixing the location of the structure complete plans and estimates! were made for the dam as built and also for raising the old dam. It was found that it would take more labor and material to raise the old dam than to build an entirely new structure in the adopted location. In addition to the cost of the work there. would be a very great risk of accident during the construction of the dam which might wipe out the pumping station. There would also have! been the work of caring for the ice;” house property which was located Just above the old dam and which would have involved serious expense,

The question of additional storage has been a pressing one for sometime. In 1911 the advisory water commission, the members of which were Drury Cooper, E. P. Darrow, W. H. Benedict, A. A. Titsworia, F. C. Schneider and A. S. March, strongly advised the immediate raising of the present dam three feet to provide the additional storage. They stated. at

that time that this would take care of the immediate need and that additional provisions could be taken after some years had passed. The present structure raising the level of the pond four and a half feet adds over) fifty percent to the additional storage contemplated by their recommendations.

Plans Made in 1914.

The plans for the dam were made! in 1914 at the time of the serious water famine which occurred in:” September of that year and it was strongly urged that the structure be, built at once so sufficient water could be stored to prevent the recurrence. of the shortage. On account of the authority to build being withheld je from the Board of Water Commissioners by the Board of Aldermen, the work was postponed until Commission Government took hold of t matter. The building of the dam was again postponed by the judgment of the advisory water board until after the completion of the filter plant as it was thought that building operations would cause the water to be made turbid. The work was finally started in the fall of 1917, The necessity of the work was shown last fall when all of the storage was used up and temporary pumping was required from the creek below the dam to maintain the necessary amount of water.

During a dry time all the water required beyond that furnished by the flow of Lawrence brook must be taken from storage. The flow of the brook was estimated by the state as given in the report on water supply as a minimum of five and a half gallons a day for the driest period. This estimate is largely in excess of the actual amount which was observed in the dry periods of 1914 and 1918. A careful measurement of the individual streams of the watershed. show that the minimum flow of the Lawrence brook area amounts to only 1,800,000 gallons for 24 hours. The consumption last September, due largely to war conditions perhaps, required seven million gallons a day so five million under these conditions must be taken from storage. City Can Supply 100,000 Population With Water by Damming Near Milltown.

When the water consumption of the city again exceeds the present provision additional storage will have to be sought by a dam somewhere above Milltown or by taking water from the Raritan River. The late Dr. Cook reported on a project for a high dam at a site near Parsons pond which would impound 1,640,000,000 gallons of water. The cost of the dam at that time was $347,000, but under present conditions, it would be two or more times that figure. As everyone has great faith in the steady growth of the city of New Brunswick which is largely dependent on the water supply the necessity of looking! forward is apparent. With the above] storage a population of 100,000 could be supplied with an adequate amount of water.


This day in History: January 26th, 1906

This day in History: January 26th, 1906

MILLTOWN’S ARMLESS WONDER AT WORK

He Hunts and Hoes, Fishes and Rows as Well as Men Who Have Arms.

MILLTOWN, Jan. 26 – Deprived of both arms forty-odd years ago, John Fox, of Milltown, has become so expert in the use of the hooks which are attached to the stumps of his arms that he does many things as well as many men who possess both arms. Fox always goes out gunning after rabbits as soon as the season opens. One of his arms was taken off below the elbow, and the other above the elbow in a graining machine In the old rubber shop at Milltown.

Fox as a gun fitted with a strap which holds the weapon in place to his shoulder. With one of his arms, he supports the gun so that he can aim it at the game, and the trigger is pulled by means of a string with his teeth. Fox was out the other day and had not been searching for rabbits more than half an hour before he shot one. He returned to Milltown and had the gun loaded again and set out for another rabbit.

The old man is now 72 years old. He is an ardent fisherman in season and also manages to scull a light boat with ease. He takes care of a garden at home and pulls a cultivator plow by means of the hooks. He is cheerful despite the deprivation of his hands.


This Day in History: January 25, 1913

This Day in History: January 25, 1913

COUNCIL ACCEPTS OFFICIALS BONDS

Special Meeting of Borough Council to Discuss Street Conditions-Want Street Commissioner-Engineer Schneider Wants Assessor’s Map.

MILLTOWN, Jan. 25.-A special meeting of the Borough Council was held in Borough Hall Thursday evening, Mayor Conrad Richter, Clerk R. A. Harkins, Borough Attorney Frederick Weigel., and Councilmen C. Bauries, H. Kuhlthau, G. Crabiel, B. Miller and A. Skewis being present.

The bonds of the collector and treasurer as well as bonds for all other officials were accepted by the Council.

The matter of the condition of the street In front of the car barn was discussed, and the Council ordered that in as much as the franchise with the Public Service provides that they (the Public Service) are to take care of the streets in front of their place, they would be ordered to do so.

Matter Left With Attorney.

The petition of the residents of Riva avenue relative to the concreting and curbing of the said avenue, was taken from the table and placed in the hands of Borough Attorney Weigel with instructions to proceed in the matter of drawing up an ordinance and specification for same as soon as possible in order to get work under way in the early spring. The street committee were authorized to purchase a horse and cart for the collection of garbage and general use in maintaining the streets.

While the Council are ready to receive bids for the collection of garbage at the same time they also are looking for a man that would act in the capacity of a general caretaker or overseer of the Borough whose duty it would be to take care of the cleaning of streets, collection of garbage, care of electric lights, etc.. Applications for which should be made to Mayor Richter. After careful consideration of expenditures. during the past year the Council seems to think it advisable to form a street cleaning department, which it is believed would be better for the people of the Borough, that it would be a great improvement over the present system, and at the same time more economical.

The Mayor was instructed to insert an advertisement in the Home News to the effect that all applications for this position should be made to him.

The appointment of a Street Commissioner for 1913, has been deferred until definite arrangements can be made.

Frederick Schneider, Borough Engineer, was present at the meeting and explained to the Mayor and Council the necessity of having an assessor’s or tax map made for the Borough, due to the fact that the legislative committee recently recommended a bill that all municipalities should have a tax map whereby the taxes could be levied more accurately. In this case, every piece of property would be sure to be taxed and the possibilities of omission would be slight.

The Council is not in a position to take any immediate action but the matter will receive careful consideration in the very near future.



Church Services at Milltown.

Dr. Morris will preach at both morning and evening services at the Methodist Church. His morning subject will be “The Cross Gives the True Estimate of Divine Love” and in the evening his subject will be “The Empty House.”

The Woman’s Home Missionary Society of this church will hold its regular monthly meeting at the home of Miss Etta Evans on Mon- day evening at 8 o’clock.

On Wednesday evening next a flinch party will be held in the lecture room under the auspices of the Epworth League. Everyone is invited to attend.

Services at the German Reformed Church will be as usual. In the afternoon Mr. Christ, assisted by members of the choir will give an organ recital in that church at 4 p. Prayer meeting in this church is held on Wednesday evening.


This Day in History: January 24, 1905

This Day in History: January 24, 1905

EIGHT YEAR OLD BOY DROWNED

Clarence Schaffer Went Through Ice While Skating at Milltown.

Clarence Schaffer, the eight-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Schaffer, of Milltown, was drowned in Lawrence Brook, near Millers’ creek, yesterday afternoon, about 4 o’clock, while skating. He and some boy friends had gone to the brook after school hours and Schaffer went out on the ice, while the other boys stayed on shore. The ice was weak, owing to recent thaws, and the boy fell in. His companions on shore were un- able to do anything for him, and the boy drowned before their eyes.

The boys carried the news to Kohlhepp’s Hotel. Bartender Denhardt and others searched for the boy for a long time and it was nearly 6 o’clock last night before. their efforts were rewarded and the body was brought ashore.

Coroner Quackenboss visited the scene of the accident and gave a permit for burial. The boy was a member of the Milltown M. E. Church, and of the Sunday School. He was a bright boy and his death will be a severe shock to many friends.

His death marks the first fatal skating accident of the season, although there have been several cases of people getting through the lee and being rescued.


This Day in History: January 23, 1914

This Day in History: January 23, 1914

EUREKA FIRE CO. BANQUET IS SET FOR FEBRUARY 21

MILLTOWN, Jan. 23-At a meeting of Eureka Fire Co. No. 1, of  Milltown, held in their rooms in the Borough Hall last evening, it was decided to hold their annual banquet on Saturday evening, Feb. 21.

The nomination of officers took place and in only one case is there opposition and that is for the fire patrol. Two men are to be elected, for this office and three names have been put on the ticket, as follows: Chris Jensen, Oscar Harkins and William Beecher.

Elwood Boyce was nominated for foreman, J. Milton Brindle for first assistant and Martin Mueller for second assistant.

Mayor William Kuhlthau, Jr., was re-nominated for the office of recording secretary and Edward V. Emmens for assistant recording secretary. Other nominees are, for financial secretary, Charles C. Richter; treasurer, C. W. Waddington, trustee, Adam Christ, and steward, John Christ.

The election will take place at the next regular meeting of the Department, Feb. 26th.

Entertainment Tonight.

Under the auspices of the official board of the Methodist church an entertainment will be held in the lecture room of that edifice tonight, which promises to be a very interesting one and for which the admission will be 15 cents for adults and 10 Cents for children. Miss Tyler, of Keyport, will entertain, and will be assisted by the local Camp Fire girls. who will present a scene from the “Childhood Days of Hiawatha” and will also render several selections.

Mr. Sayre Again in the Oyster Business

E. F. Sayre, the proprietor of the Hotel Marguerite, who about five years ago used to supply many families in the Borough with their oyster requirements, is again in the oyster business. He is serving his patrons with the most delicious Rockaway oysters and is also in a position to supply families and give prompt attention to orders for parties, etc. Mr. Sayre’s advertisement appears in today’s issue.

Other Milltown News.

Last night in the Crescent Quoit League, Messrs. Snedeker and Stelle. won five straight from Chas, Chris and Ted Snedeker, and three out of five from J. Crabiel and H. Moore. Ted Snedeker and Chas. Christ defeated Jensen and Junker, four out of five.

Tonight at Richter’s Park, the A.. A. A. will meet the Minta A. C. of South River, in a game of basketball and from present indications a lively contest will take place. Both teams will present strong lineups.

Choir to Give Musical Comedy. Members of the Methodist Church. choir are rehearsing for a musical comedy to be given in the church on Feb. 11th, entitled, “The Tale of the Hat.”The entertainment promises to be an interesting one. Miss relen Glock, choir leader, is coaching them.


This Day in History: December 30th, 1920

This Day in History: December 30th, 1920

N.Y. POLICE WILL LET MILLTOWN BANK ROBBERS COME HERE

Local Charges to Come First in Long Series Made Against Chaffee and Bitzberger – May Wait Return of Judge Daly.


Milltown National Bank at Michelin Tire - 1924

Local authorities have been promised by the New York police, it was learned today, that unless a more serious crime than robbery is fastened on Jerome Chaffee and Harry Bitzberger, arrested in New York on Tuesday through the work of County Detective Ferd David of Middlesex, the men will be sent back here and will not be held for the many crimes charged against them there. Detective David said today that it was his belief, that Chaffee’s story that the Milltown robbery was his first “job” is the truth but that Bitzberger appears to have a bad record.

According to Chaffee’s story, which has been partially verified by Detective David, he came to New York in 1916 on his release from Fort Leavenworth military prison and endeavored to straight. He ran a pastry shop for a time and later became a chauffeur and held a responsible position. He was married early in 1919 and told his wife of his bad military record but promised to go straight.

A short time ago, however, he met Bitzberger, who had been a fellow convict at Leavenworth, and got him a room in the same house, not knowing what he was doing. It is believed that Bitszberger operated alone for a while and got Chaffee in only in time for the Milltown robbery.

To Be Held Tomorrow.

At yesterday’s arraignment of the men, the local detectives were unable to produce exemplified copies of the warrants, but they will have them ready tomorrow and the prisoners will then be committed for thirty days pending extradition.

As Judge Daly will not return until January 7 there will probably be no attempt to bring the men back before that time, but they will likely be indicted by the Grand Jury on that date and then brought back as soon as the extradition proceedings can be arranged.

Wanted In Westchester.

Police officials in Westchester County reported yesterday that Chaffee and Bitzberger were believed to be members of a band which has looted many homes in that county. Soon after Voorhees and Watson were arrested the fingerprint expert of White Plains said that the men’s finger marks revealed their connection with robberies there.

The police of New Rochelle were seeking Voorhees and Watson for burglaries there as a result of a confession by Arthur B. Clayton, recently sent to Sing Sing, who implicated them.

Fingerprints on a safe in Pelham Manor, robbed of Liberty bonds and jewelry valued at $5,000, were believed to be those of Chaffee and Bitzberger, it was said.

The men also are alleged to have participated in the robbery of $7,000 worth of clothing from the store of Charles Wellers at Peekskill and of $5,000 worth of liquors from the country home of Harold Stearns at Tarrytown. Several other suburban robberies are attributed to them.

Inspector Coughlin received word from Pittsburgh last night that Bitzberger’s real name was Lloyd Henry Bitzburger, and that he was the son of John P. Bitzburger, a wealthy plumber of Lancaster. Bitzberger appeared in Lancaster last October and soon afterward a bakery was robbed and $3,000 in Liberty bonds taken from a safe. On Nov. 11 Bitzberger was married at Harrisburg, and five days later the First National Bank at Landisville, six miles from Lancaster, was entered and between $100,000 and $150,000 in negotiable securities taken. Bitzberger disappeared on the day of the robbery.

It is believed that Bitzberger was not connected with the big Sleepy Hollow robbery, as he did not meet Voorhees and Watson until after that time, but he is thought to have operated with them in later Westchester robberies.

It was learned today that the automobile used by the gang in the Milltown robbery was purchased by Chaffee with money furnished Bitzberger by Voorhees and Watson.