This Day in History: September 22, 1924

This Day in History: September 22, 1924

LADIES’ AID OF MILLTOWN NOW IN FIRST PLACE

Wins Special Award and Passes Highland Park Eastern Star

COUPONS GIVEN THREE MORE DAYS


The Ladies Aid of St. Paul’s Church of Milltown went into first place in the week-end tabulation of the votes in the popularity contest of the women organizations in Middlesex and Somerset counties under the auspices of the New Brunswick merchants, theaters and Board of Trade. The Milltown organization was awarded first prize in last week’s shopping and was given credit for 3,000 votes and first place in the contest.

The St. John’s Rosary Society was given second prize of 2,000 votes and moves into fourth place, one, position above the Lady Foresters, No. 8. The 6,000 votes are awarded by the Sunday Times to the organizations whose members shop in the greatest number of stores on Monday of each week.

The Eastern Star, Highland Park Chapter, which has held down First place for many weeks, drops Into second place by virtue of the 3,000 vote credit to the Ladies’ Aid of Milltown. The Milltown organization now has a total vote of 51,470, While Eastern Star is credited with 48,824 votes.

The Ladies’ Auxiliary of Anshe Emeth Temple retains third position with 37,067 votes, and St. John’s Rosary is in fourth place with 33,784, while the Lady Foresters, No. 8, are in fifth, place with 32,067 votes.

The organizations have three more days in which to compete for the $600 in cash prizes. Coupons will be given by the merchants today, Wednesday and next Monday. The contest managers announce that they will receive the votes up until October 2. When the curtain will be rung down on the contest.

The standing in the contest follows:

Ladies’ Aid – St. Paul’s Church Milltown – 51470

Eastern Star, Highland Park Chapter – 48,824

Ladies Auxiliary Anshe Emeth Temple – 37,067

St. John’s Rosary Soc. – 33,871

Golden Rod Council No. 20 – Daughters of America – 20,401

Y. W. C. A. – 17,573

Catholic Daughters, Court Loretta – 16,655

Hebrew Ladies’ Aid Soc. – 13,628


This Day in History: September 9th, 1912

This Day in History: September 9th, 1912

FELL FROM BALCONY AND IS BADLY HURT

Edward Gallagher Sustains Fractured Skull and is Rushed to St. Peter’s Hospital Still in a Critical Condition.


MILLTOWN, Sept. 9.-Edward Galligan, the popular and genial clerk of the Hotel Marguerite, met with a serious injury early Sunday morning. when he fell from the upper balcony of that hotel to the pavement below, landing on his head and back

Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Sayre retired late Saturday night, but were awakened at 1.30 on Sunday morning by a ringing of the doorbell. It was George Lewin, who had seen the man fall and had given the warning.

Mr. Sayre quickly came out and carried Gallegan into the hotel, and & trolley car was sent to bring Dr. Forney, who arrived soon after. He advised that he be taken to the hospital and a special car took the injured clerk to St. Peter’s Hospital New Brunswick, where he is still in critical condition.

Robert St. John, a nephew of Mrs. Elmer Sayre, whose room fronts upon the balcony. Was awake when Galligan went out to take smoke before retiring. He says that the clerk took a seat upon the railing and was warned by him that he would fall although he leaned against a pillar with both arms clasped about his head and also around the pillar. He was probably very tired after a hard day’s work at the hotel and cloud of. The fall Was witnessed by St. John, who said that the body descended with a rotary motion, which probably saved him from instant death.

The many friends of the clerk wish for him A speedy recovery.

FIREMEN HAVE CLAM BAKE

MILLTOWN, Sept. 9. The clam bake of Eureka Fire Company No. 1, held in Miller’s Grove yesterday. Was well attended and was considered a great success

The married men, ably coached by Wm. Killern, were only the victors over the single men in an interesting game of baseball.

The German Reformed Church is planning to celebrate its fortieth anniversary, which falls in the middle of October.

Mises Barbara and Lena Lins of New Brunswick, were the guests of Miss Kuhlthau, yesterday.

Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Brown, of New Brunswick were Sunday guests in the borough

Miss Anna Latcher, of Brooklyn, was the guest of Miss Susie  Crabiel

Arthur Intemann, of New Brunswick, was a borough great last evening.

The French “dancing party,” held at Milltown Park on Saturday night, was well attended and proved to be a great success.

A Feed and Grain Business

With the erection of a 30 by 60 building the Kuhithau Brothers are -launching into the feed and grain business. This is not an entirely new project to them as for several years they have been carrying on & small feed business, but now they are greatly enlarging their facilities and will sell at retail and wholesale

John Christ, of South Amboy, was the rest of his parents, Mr. and Adam Christ, over Sunday. Miss Grace Farmer, of South River,  was the guest of Miss Ella Prill, over the week-end.


This Day in History: September 8th, 1915

This Day in History: September 8th, 1915

Farmer Disappears and Milltown Man Hurt on Trolley


FARMER DISAPPEARS

Milltown, Sept 8.- – Just four months ago today. Charles Altvater, who lived on a farm with his wife near Milltown. left home and no word has been received from him nor has anyone in this vicinity any trace as to his whereabouts. Any information that would lead to the finding, of the missing man would be very much appreciated by his wife, Mrs. Rose Altvater.

MILLTOWN MAN HURT ON TROLLEY

MILLTOWN, Sept. 8. As a result of putting his head out of a trolley car window, while the trolley was moving. Mr. Wyckoff, of Ford Avenue, Milltown, is confined to his home with several severe gashes in his head. The accident occurred on Labor Day.


This Day in History: August 16th, 1915

This Day in History: August 16th, 1915

LATE PASSENGERS WERE STALLED

Local People Suffer Because of Trouble Caused in Past by Rough Element – Misunderstanding Leads to Embarrassing Situation.


Fully fifty New Brunswickers were stranded at the Milltown car barns, Saturday evening as they were unable to reach this city by trolley. Not being able to secure rooms in the borough they had to be contented with sleeping in the waiting room at the car barns which accommodated about ten. The passengers were provoked with the treatment accorded them by the employees of the Public Service who refused to take them to this city

The passengers boarded the trolley a South Amboy, it being the last car out of the city which only goes as far as the car barns. The trolley went at a fast pace and jumped the track at Yate’s corner South River. After considerable difficulty, the car was jacked up and placed back on the tracks. The passengers were greatly shaken up some being tossed from their seats,

The conductor collected the full fare from South Amboy to New Brunswick which entitled them to ride to this city. The passengers presuming that the car would proceed to New Brunswick, paid the last fare without a murmur.

Arriving at the car barns, a car swung out with several motormen and conductors aboard. Several of the passengers alighted from the South Amboy Car and dashed to the New Brunswick-bound car anticipating a ride to this city. Several got aboard but many more were not so fortunate. The conductor prevented several from jumping aboard the moving car telling them that the car would stop as soon as he swung out of the car barns. As soon as the car swung from the barns the motorman put on more speed and left the crowd standing in front of the barns.

Other Side of Story.

The Public Service side of the story was given to the Home News to-day to the effect that the company…

CONTINUED ON PAGE TWO.

had no intimation that there were to be New Brunswickers on the 1 a. m. trolley out of South Amboy, which is due to run only as far as the Milltown car barns, and it is stated that ample accommodations would have been made if such knowledge had been given to the Public Service.

It was about 2.30 a. m. that the trouble occurred at Milltown, and it is said that much of it was due to a rough element that had hung around the car barns with the expressed purpose of riding to New Brunswick on the car which brings the trolleymen to their homes here and which the company is not obliged to run, but does so simply to accommodate their workmen.

So much disorder was shown by this rough element that the car barn employees had to send for the Milltown officers, fearing damage to the property. It is said that a number of men make a practice of remaining in Milltown every Saturday night to ride home on the trolleymen’s car and when the large crowd tried to board it Saturday night the crews were fearful of what might happen en route.

It was not until afterward that the company learned that there were a number of very respectable people in the car that left South Amboy at 1 a. m., and who were stalled at Milltown, and it is said a special car would have been dispatched to Milltown to bring them to New Brunswick if one of them had telephoned to the office here.

Extra cars had been running from South Amboy on Saturday night, the last ones leaving there for through trip at 12.15 Sunday morning.


This Day In History: August 6, 1913

This Day In History: August 6, 1913

HURT WHEN TROLLEY CAR JUMPS TRACK

John Funk and Motorman Carter, of Milltown, Have Miraculous Escapes in a Peculiar Accident at Berdine’s Corner, Scene of Fatal Accident – Passenger Caught in Wreck


In exactly the same spot, and in very much the same manner, where Edward McKeon, a trolley conductor, of this city, met his death a year ago. John Funk, of Milltown, a bookkeeper at the plant of the Enameled Brick and Tile Company at South River, received Injuries at 1:20 this morning, when a trolley car on which he was a passenger, left the tracks at Berdine’s Corner, while going at high speed, and crashed into a telegraph pole.

Funk’s Injuries are not serious, and consist of an injury to the leg. and severe bruises about the body He had a miraculous escape from death or serious injury. As did Motorman Carter of the car.

Carter is a resident of keyport, but boards at Milltown. He has been motorman but short time. The car which came to grief at the corner which has been the scene of several accidents, left here at 1 o’clock. As is the custom the car was speeding on the George’s Road track. Motor man Carter says that he applied the brakes before coming to the turn, and that they refused to work. though they had been working well previously. The car jumped the track, and a few second later the body of the car left the trucks, and crushed sideways into a telegraph pole. The car fell and the pole smashed in the top of the car. At the time of the incident Funk was talking to Conductor Channatti. and he was sitting well toward the front of the car. Had he been in t the center or the rear, he would probably have been badly injured or killed.

The car was a complete wreck, and Funk was compelled to crawl out of the wreckage. Motorman Carter stuck to his port, and he also had to fight his way out. He kicked out the front windows of the vestibule, and crawled out. The conductor escaped injury.

Over a year ago an early morning car left the tracks at the same turn, and conductor Mckeon was almost instantly killed. That time there were no passengers on the car. This morning Funk was the only passenger.


This Day in History: August 5th, 1911

This Day in History: August 5th, 1911

THIS IS MILLTOIWN’S BIG DAY

Parade, Picnic and Fireworks Will Help Celebrate the Arrival of Borough’s First Fire Apparatus- Boy Badly Burned.


MILLTOWN, Aug. 5. The day of great import to Milltown history has at last arrived and every resident from the ages of 5 to 90 will do honor to the firemen who take charge of the day.

Homes and public buildings are prettily decorated with the red, white and blue and the air of the town is one of gaiety. The borough hall is covered with flags and bunting and is a fit home for the borough first fire apparatus.

Picnic at Milltown Park.

The big picnic, which is staged at Milltown Park, begins at 3 o’clock, when Sheridan’s full orchestra plays for all who care to dance. On the adjoining grounds the Crescent A. C. are battling for supremacy over Spotswood and slump or no slump a Milltown team cannot lose today.

Parade Begins at 1 O’clock.

At 1 o’clock the firemen will meet at the borough hall to form the line parade. The line will be lead by the borough’s stalwart marshals followed by the Milltown Fife, Drum and Bugle Corps, which will reel off the tunes as never before. Then will come the Mayor, Council, and other borough officials In automobiles. Following these there will be the firemen and visiting firemen and last but not least the new apparatus which will be the cynosure of ail eyes.

Line of March.

The line of march will be from the Borough Hall on Main street to Church street, to Clay street, to Ford avenue, to Main street, to Booraem avenue, countermarch to Riva avenue, Riva avenue to grove.

When darkness has sufficiently covered the town a brilliant display of fireworks will be given at the grove. Great preparations have been made to accommodate the large crowd.

Mayor Richters’ Day.

This will be a great day for Mayor Conrad Richter, who has been the instrument in organizing a fire department and whose vigor has finally obtained fire protection for the borough. This is his day too.

Boy Badly Burned.

The four year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Lee, met with a painful accident last night at his home on Clay street. While passing a kerosene light on a table, his clothes caught on the table cover upsetting the lamp. In a twinkling he was In flames. His father was standing near and managed to quickly beat out the flames, but not before the son was badly burned,

The boy was removed to the hospital where it was said that he was in a critical condition. The damage to the room was slight.

Mrs. William G. Evans, Miss Pearl Evans, and Russell Evans have returned from a visit to Long Island.

Miss Alma Kuhlthau has returned from Troy, N. Y., where she has been entertained by friends.

Mrs. Charles Sevenhair returned home last evening after a visit with Mrs. Henry Dorn at Avon.

Dr. N. N. Forney has purchased a Reo touring car.

Mrs. S. E. Stelle, Miss May Evans Miss Mildred Stelle and Clarkson Stelle were Asbury Park visitors on Friday.

Miss Florence Snediker starts tomorrow for a visit with friends in New Haven.