This Day In History: August 6, 1913

This Day In History: August 6, 1913

HURT WHEN TROLLEY CAR JUMPS TRACK

John Funk and Motorman Carter, of Milltown, Have Miraculous Escapes in a Peculiar Accident at Berdine’s Corner, Scene of Fatal Accident – Passenger Caught in Wreck


In exactly the same spot, and in very much the same manner, where Edward McKeon, a trolley conductor, of this city, met his death a year ago. John Funk, of Milltown, a bookkeeper at the plant of the Enameled Brick and Tile Company at South River, received Injuries at 1:20 this morning, when a trolley car on which he was a passenger, left the tracks at Berdine’s Corner, while going at high speed, and crashed into a telegraph pole.

Funk’s Injuries are not serious, and consist of an injury to the leg. and severe bruises about the body He had a miraculous escape from death or serious injury. As did Motorman Carter of the car.

Carter is a resident of keyport, but boards at Milltown. He has been motorman but short time. The car which came to grief at the corner which has been the scene of several accidents, left here at 1 o’clock. As is the custom the car was speeding on the George’s Road track. Motor man Carter says that he applied the brakes before coming to the turn, and that they refused to work. though they had been working well previously. The car jumped the track, and a few second later the body of the car left the trucks, and crushed sideways into a telegraph pole. The car fell and the pole smashed in the top of the car. At the time of the incident Funk was talking to Conductor Channatti. and he was sitting well toward the front of the car. Had he been in t the center or the rear, he would probably have been badly injured or killed.

The car was a complete wreck, and Funk was compelled to crawl out of the wreckage. Motorman Carter stuck to his port, and he also had to fight his way out. He kicked out the front windows of the vestibule, and crawled out. The conductor escaped injury.

Over a year ago an early morning car left the tracks at the same turn, and conductor Mckeon was almost instantly killed. That time there were no passengers on the car. This morning Funk was the only passenger.


This Day in History: August 5th, 1911

This Day in History: August 5th, 1911

THIS IS MILLTOIWN’S BIG DAY

Parade, Picnic and Fireworks Will Help Celebrate the Arrival of Borough’s First Fire Apparatus- Boy Badly Burned.


MILLTOWN, Aug. 5. The day of great import to Milltown history has at last arrived and every resident from the ages of 5 to 90 will do honor to the firemen who take charge of the day.

Homes and public buildings are prettily decorated with the red, white and blue and the air of the town is one of gaiety. The borough hall is covered with flags and bunting and is a fit home for the borough first fire apparatus.

Picnic at Milltown Park.

The big picnic, which is staged at Milltown Park, begins at 3 o’clock, when Sheridan’s full orchestra plays for all who care to dance. On the adjoining grounds the Crescent A. C. are battling for supremacy over Spotswood and slump or no slump a Milltown team cannot lose today.

Parade Begins at 1 O’clock.

At 1 o’clock the firemen will meet at the borough hall to form the line parade. The line will be lead by the borough’s stalwart marshals followed by the Milltown Fife, Drum and Bugle Corps, which will reel off the tunes as never before. Then will come the Mayor, Council, and other borough officials In automobiles. Following these there will be the firemen and visiting firemen and last but not least the new apparatus which will be the cynosure of ail eyes.

Line of March.

The line of march will be from the Borough Hall on Main street to Church street, to Clay street, to Ford avenue, to Main street, to Booraem avenue, countermarch to Riva avenue, Riva avenue to grove.

When darkness has sufficiently covered the town a brilliant display of fireworks will be given at the grove. Great preparations have been made to accommodate the large crowd.

Mayor Richters’ Day.

This will be a great day for Mayor Conrad Richter, who has been the instrument in organizing a fire department and whose vigor has finally obtained fire protection for the borough. This is his day too.

Boy Badly Burned.

The four year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Lee, met with a painful accident last night at his home on Clay street. While passing a kerosene light on a table, his clothes caught on the table cover upsetting the lamp. In a twinkling he was In flames. His father was standing near and managed to quickly beat out the flames, but not before the son was badly burned,

The boy was removed to the hospital where it was said that he was in a critical condition. The damage to the room was slight.

Mrs. William G. Evans, Miss Pearl Evans, and Russell Evans have returned from a visit to Long Island.

Miss Alma Kuhlthau has returned from Troy, N. Y., where she has been entertained by friends.

Mrs. Charles Sevenhair returned home last evening after a visit with Mrs. Henry Dorn at Avon.

Dr. N. N. Forney has purchased a Reo touring car.

Mrs. S. E. Stelle, Miss May Evans Miss Mildred Stelle and Clarkson Stelle were Asbury Park visitors on Friday.

Miss Florence Snediker starts tomorrow for a visit with friends in New Haven.


This Day in History: August 4th, 1911

This Day in History: August 4th, 1911

RARITAN RIVER RAILROAD IS PROSPEROUS

Last Year Best Ever, Says Supt. Frank Hoffman, and This Year Will Go Ahead of That Road is But 21 Years Old.


Frank Hoffman, superintendent of the Raritan River Railroad, was in town to-day and told a Home News reporter that his line was enjoying the most prosperous period of its existence.

“Last year was the best ever for the road.” he said, “and the indications are that this one will be even better.”

The Raritan River Railroad is just a little over age, having been formally opened on January 6, 1890. Its beginnings were unpretentious, and as a passenger line it has never startled the universe, owing to the competition of the trolley from New Brunswick to South Amboy, but its freight business has grown enormously. The main line of the railroad to South Amboy is but a tiny fraction of its trackage, as switches miles in length branch off in every direction to the clay works along the south shore of the Raritan. It would take a full day to go over the entire system of this road.

To the Raritan River line Is due principally the remarkable growth of Milltown, South River and Sayreville, for furnishing a competitor to the Pennsylvania in freight business.

Superintendent Hoffman was formerly county detective of Middlesex, under Prosecutors Berdine and Booraem giving up the place to take charge of the railroad.


This Day in History: August 3rd, 1911

This Day in History: August 3rd, 1911

FIRE APPARATUS FOR MILLTOWN

Will Be Exhibited at Fireman’s Picnic on August 5


MILLTOWN. Aug. 3. At 4 o’clock yesterday afternoon the new fire apparatus recently purchased by the borough from Boyd Brothers, of Philadelphia, for $4,100 arrived in the borough. On the truck was a chauffeur and representative of the firm and Mayor Conrad Richter, who, being anxious for fire protection in the borough, did much in bringing about the purchase of the truck.

The apparatus certainly made a fine appearance as it came through the borough yesterday. The body of the truck is red with yellow trimmings and on the front in large letters is the name of Milltown’s first fire company. On the truck are two chemical tanks, several feet of hose, extension ladders and hooks, which make a complete outfit.

The truck is propelled by motor power and is capable of making from 20 to 25 miles an hour. The body is set upon an autocar chassis. It is equipped with solid rubber tires.

The apparatus will be on exhibition on Saturday, August 5, when the firemen will hold their first grand picnic at Milltown Park. The day promises to be one of the greatest days of celebration in the history of the borough. The dancing will begin at the park at 3 p. m. and will continue until midnight. At 7 p. m. the officials of the borough. In automobiles, and the firemen will form a parade, preceded by the Milltown Fife, Drum and Bugle Corps. The line of march has not as yet been determined, but will include the principal streets of the borough.

But this- – pageant is not all. After dark there will be a grand display of fireworks at the park, which will attract many.

Saturday will be almost a holiday in the borough. It is thought that business places will close in the early afternoon in honor of the firemen. Houses will be gayly decorated with flags and bunting.

Complimentary tickets have been sent to the fire companies of New Brunswick and a record-breaking crowd is expected.


This Day in History: August 1st, 1910

This Day in History: August 1st, 1910

DECLARE CITIZEN HALTED JUSTICE / BOYS DELAY TRAIN

Exciting Scene When as Unlicensed Peddler is Protected From Justice by a Friend in Milltown.


MILLTOWN, Aug 1. The councilmen of the borough have a hard problem before them. How are they to enforce an ordinance that has been passed for a year when private citizens interfere? The councilmen for a long time have been trying to enforce an ordinance, protecting the merchants of the borough, providing for the licensing of peddlers. At the last regular meeting the council laid especial stress on the ordinance and determined to have it enforced. As a result several peddlers have been forced to procure licenses and one has been arrested for neglect of the law.

On Friday evening last, a peddler entered the town and went to several in the borough and sold goods without having a license. Councilman Rappleyea made a complaint before Justice Headley and as the man was near by the Justice ordered him to come to his office.

Before the man could get to the office a resident of the borough suddenly became very friendly with tie peddler and rushing over to the Justice demanded his freedom on the ground of being a friend. The man did not stop at that but threatened the Justice and called him vile names, the Justice says.

Mr. Headlev was very much taken back both by the friendship existing between the two men and by the orders given to him by a private citizen. As there was no constable on hand to take the. two men in hand, he determined that with odds as they were it was best to let matters rest, and to prevent a scene on the street, the” peddler was permitted to take the next car out of town. It is doubtful whether the man will again try by the influence of his friend to sell goods without a license as he seemed quite relieved to escape.

BOYS DELAY TRAIN.

Ernest Sohlosser and Harry Christ, boys of about five years of age, were playing on the high trestle of the Raritan River Railroad recently when a train came in sight. Whether the boys were frightened or intended to stop the train is not known, but they kept their positions and the engineer by quick work brought the train to a standstill and led the boys from their dangerous play ground.


This Day in History: July 21st, 1918

This Day in History: July 21st, 1918

RESIDENTS OF MILLTOWN BOROUGH HONOR THEIR SOLDIER BOYS BY THE NOVEL DISPLAY OF NAMES


To our neighbors in Milltown must go the credit for a unique and decidedly appropriate tribute to the men who have left there for service in the army and navy an honor roll of the names of the men placed on a board 10 feet high in a prominent part of the town.

The idea was “first suggested in the borough council by C. V. L. Booream and referred to the War Relief Council, who completed the plans that finally resulted in the dedication of the honor roll board on July 4th, the council financing it

The ceremony was most impressive. The board was draped with two very, large flags and at a given signal two girls drew them aside disclosing the names in clear letters that may easily .be read from some distance. Speeches were made by different ones, among them being Samuel Hoffman, one of the four-minute speakers in New Brunswick.

This tribute of Milltown to her departed soldiers is one that cannot help but appeal to everyone as being a fine expression of the sentiments of the “home folks.” It is an act that will be appreciated and remembered by these men who have offered their all to their country. The sign seems to say, just as plainly as if the words were written on it in huge letters: “These are men from Milltown who have gone to fight for us; we are proud of them and are standing back of them to the limit.”

Here are the names in the order in which they appear on the Milltown honor list:  


S. Bridier, C. Bordel, L. Bernard, J. Bourgarde, J. P. Saury, P. Barrere, H. Belin, J. Bernard, P. Bartherottte,  L. Bondee, S. Brickman, W. Barr, W. Bradley, H. J. Baier, C. Bluming, I. Bagoyne, P. Collins, Al. Christ, E. Collins, E. Chevalier, P. Cholet, T. Chardonnet, P. Coxie, R. Calledce, F. Cojean, E. Collet, L. Cannaff, F. Cretau, J. W: Dorn, J. P. Domas, L. Dheere, L. Decelle, M. David, L. Daviou, N. De Srnet, R. Evenou, F. Fleurant, M. Fichant, W. Galanias, J. Gaydier, C. Grand, L Corends. A. Grangemarre, H. Hartlander, C. Hartlander, G. Hartlander, M. Kulthau, C. M. Kulthau, L. LeGuillou. H. Okerson. J. Poigonec, G: Poigonec. F. Poupon, J. Magnet, J. Rupprecht, R . Rusellot, A. Renoux.

R. Richter, P. Schlumberger, P. Richards, Jr., P. Sheppard, C. Schwendeman, C. Villecourt, V. Troulakis, N. Suignard, A. Vauchez, N Van Voden. P. Ginelewet, J. Peflofky, G. Papas. Roy Reeves. R. Reeves, D. Romero, C. Syottonis, V. Van Canwenbuge, J. Genet, H. Fahrenholz, A. Anderson, J. P. Arvie, E. Gele, J. Gorgeon, R. Headley, J. Heimel, E. Jumet, M. Jegou, J. Kopetz, J. LeRoux, H. Meirose, S. Perry, Jr., J. Perry, L. Leroux, A. Pialoux, L. Mechan, A. J. Heim, J. Shea, N. Ropers, M. Queignec, E. Garde, R. Heimel, C Hughe, H. Kurmas, J. Kearborn, A. Lins, J. W. Lins, H. W. Lins, L. Mitton, W. Posekv, J. LaFaige, O. Haeg-ens, V. Laz, R. L. Walters, W. Wegant, J. Wegant, G. DeMontelleon, A. Dickinson, B. Christ, A. Wysems, G. Worthage, C. J. Weyde, A. Fabre, S. Farbat, Kupkrinski, F. Mather, N. Morzoraka, J. Poloski, J. Vandresitz, J. Zadusk, Ferdland R. Crabiel