This Day in History: November 24th, 1920

Michelin tire Promotional Postcard 1910

LIQUOR SALES AT MILLTOWN HIT BY COMMERCE BOARD


MILLTOWN, Nov. 24-The first luncheon-meeting of the Milltown Chamber of Commerce was held last evening at the Michelin Cafeteria which proved to be one of the most interesting meetings ever held by this body. A feature of the gathering was the condemnation of the borough’s present “wide-open” condition.

Those present were: Frank G. Boyce, J. M. Crabiel, H. A. Christ, W. R. Evans, E. V. Emens, J. P. Herbert. Ida J. Hermann, William S. Hannah, J. H. Junker, J. Knoll. Jr., M. Kropp. John Klotzbach, C. Kuhlthau, K. Kuhlthau, W. H. Kuhlthau, C. W. Kuhlthau, Geo. Kuhlthau, Geo. Lowne, H. R. M. Meyers, Spencer Perry, C. C. Richter, C. M. Snedeker. Philip Simpson. Harold J. Schlosser, Addison Thompson. Fred Wagner, Charles Zimmerman, Mrs. Chas. Hodapp. Miss Susie Crabiel, Louis Slon. Irving Crabiel, Dr. S. F. Weston and Howard S. DeHart.

After the luncheon which was thoroughly enjoyed by all the regular meeting was indulged in, President John H. Klotzbach presiding. Clerk of the Board of Education Howard S. DeHart made the first address of the evening in presenting the business side of the Board of Education to those present, presenting the fact that the larger attendance, higher cost of textbooks, higher salaries paid teachers, etc., of today, have a great bearing on the great expense that is attached to our school today, especially calling attention that the transportation of our children which alone runs up as high as four thousand dollars in the course of a year. Mr. DeHart urged the hearty co-operation of the folks of the town to insure proper training of the children.

Dr. S. F. Weston, supervising principal of the school, was the next speaker of the evening on the Relation of School to Education, what education does toward making for a safer democracy, and also how the social and recreational education of a child tends to develop that child in the higher and better methods of life. Dr. Weston dwelt upon the opportunities afforded today to the man or woman who has been properly prepared for life by means of an education.

The fact was brought out as to following out the methods of instruction as laid down by the State and that the local school is complying with all requirements of the State body with exception of the fact that there is no domestic science department at this time. The reason being given that up to this time there has not been sufficient room, and secondly, the Board of Education did not feel financially able to put on any more expense than they were absolutely compelled o at this time.

The fact was also brought out during the discussions that while a four-room addition is being added to the present school structure it will not be many years before more room will be required. The Clerk stated in fact that if it was not for the high cost of building materials and Labor a new eight-room school would have been asked for at this time instead of only a four room addition to the present building.

The second question on the calendar-Does Milltown get a share of fish and game in comparison with the licenses issued? Many of the sportsmen present did not think Milltown did get a fair share of game and upon the suggestion of those present a committee of three was appointed to make an investigation and report back to the Chamber at the next meeting, namely: Fish and Game Committee: Charles Zimmerman, Charles Snedeker, Harold J. Schlosser. The question of can Milltown have its own electrical inspector to insure better service in Milltown was thoroughly discussed and the sentiment was that Milltown should have its own inspector.

Who knows the police signal system? This question was spoken upon by chairman of the police committee of the borough council, Harold J. Schlosser who explained that if anyone desired a policeman at any time to call the Michelin Tire Company and they would be sure to find one of the town officers there at any time during the day and any time in the evening up to 11 30 o’clock. It was pointed out that an arrangement had been made some years ago with the Telephone Company so that the telephone operator would know just what course to pursue. By mutual consent the matter was left in the hands of the borough council for their consideration.

After a discussion of the trolley service being given to Milltown at present, the following resolution was adopted, the secretary being instructed to forward a copy to the superintendent at New Brunswick and also one copy to headquarters in Newark, namely:

Whereas, the Public Service Railway Company has recently placed in operation cars between Milltown and New Brunswick on a fifteen minute schedule.

“Resolved, that the Chamber of Commerce voice its approval of this progressive step, and that we extend our thanks to the Railway Company, and sincerely trust that this arrangement may continue in effect permanently to the mutual advantage of the Railway Company and the people of our community.

“Resolved further that it would also be very much appreciated if the “Milltown only cars” could be run as far as Heinz’ Switch so-as to give South Milltown residents service equal to that of North Milltown residents.

“Resolved further, that a copy of this resolution be forwarded to the General Manager of the Public Service Railway Company at Newark and a copy to the local superintendent at New Brunswick.”

Would a retail merchants association be of interest to Milltown business men was discussed favorably and the following committee was appointed to make investigation and report at the next meeting with the view of getting such an organization underway: Retail Merchants Committee: C. W. Kuhithau, F. G. Boyce, H. A. Christ.

Harry R. B. Meyers, ex-president of the Chamber of Commerce came out forcibly on the question of law and order, pointing out the amount of drunkenness in Milltown, the bold and open sales of liquor, the playing of poker, shooting of craps and the like. It was pointed out that there: is no time like the present for a general cleaning up in this respect and upon motion, the secretary was authorized to communicate to the Borough Council that the subject of law enforcement was thoroughly discussed at this meeting of the Chamber of Commerce and ask that the Council give the matter their very careful consideration.

Harold J. Schlosser, chairman of the police committee, was given an opportunity to express himself. He stated that there were violations of the law going on and only recently a crap game was raided but for some reason or other there was no publicity given the matter.

It was pointed out that a general. clean-up that would keep the town boys out of questionable games and pastimes would not only be in the town’s interest but in the interest of the boys themselves as far as their economic advancement is concerned.

It was also pointed out during the discussion that any organization that would permit gambling in its rooms. was not only a disgrace to the organization but to the town as well.

An editorial from one of the country newspapers setting forth a plan to gain information as to the attractiveness of a town by sending out a questionnaire to each member asking what induced them to come to the town in which they live was read by the secretary for future information of the Chamber.

Charles E. Denhard and Louis Sion were admitted into membership of the Chamber.

The Civic Department of the Chamber of Commerce reported that the Hallowe’en celebration was the most successful affair of its kind ever held in this section. The financial report of the celebration was as follows:

Amount of Collections

John Christ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00

Alfred Christ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5.00

Dr. Forney. . . . . . . .  . . . . . . . . . .  . .$5.00

C. W. Kuhlthau. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5.00

Buster Brown Shoe Store. . . . . . . . . $5.00

Hugo Laufer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2.00

Mrs. McGaughey. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2.00

Mrs. L. J. Hermann. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1:00

Frank Hodapp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5.00

Frank Hodapp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5.00

H. A. Christ Co…….. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5.00

Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $50.00

Expenses

Music for dancing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.00

Hall decorations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5.49

Red lights. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4.80

Prizes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $40.00

Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $82.29

The $50.00 collected having been used for payment of bills as indicated above, the following were or- dered paid out of the funds of the Chamber of Commerce to make up the deficit, namely:

J. M. Crablel, advances…. .$22.00

Estate C. Hodapp . . . . $4.80

Mae E. Kuhlthau, sundries… . . $5.49

Total . . . . . . . . . . .$32.29

General expenses were ordered paid

as follows:

C. Jensen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  $4.00

J. H. Junker, secretary, stamps

envelopes and post cards . . . . . . . $2.03

The following resolution was adopted:

“Whereas the Chamber of Commerce of the Borough of Milltown in regular session assembled at the Michelin Cafeteria are fully aware of the educational, recreational and social advantages that the Michelin Community House affords to the Borough of Hilltown, be it and it is hereby

“Resolved that a vote of thanks by the Chamber of Commerce be ex-tended to the Michelin Tire Company for their untiring efforts to make Milltown not only an attractive place to live but to work as well. “Resolved further that a copy of this resolution be sent to the Michelin Tire Company and that a copy be spread upon the minutes of this organization.”



Church Notices.

Tomorrow morning at the Re- formed Church John Schmidt will occupy the pulpit at 10:20 in a special Thanksgiving service. A special collection for the Middlesex Hospital of New Brunswick will be taken. All are cordially invited to attend.

Tonight will be Women’s Home Missionary night at the St. James Church, New Brunswick, and all local members are urged to attend the meeting.

The Women’s Republican meeting scheduled for tomorrow night has been postponed by the president, Mrs. Kuhlthau, and will be held next week. All members are asked to please vote.

Mr. and Mrs. Irving Crablel have returned from their wedding trip spent in the New England States.

Friday, December 10, has been set aside by the Reformed Church Ladies’ Aid Society for their annual Christmas sale in Fed Men’s hall.

The bazaar or fair now in progress by the local Catholic mission will close tonight and it will be the last chance to get some real Christmas gifts at real bargains. Dancing will

also be enjoyed. A large crowd was on hand last night.

Movies.

For the first time, Douglas Fairbanks will appear on the screen in Milltown tomorrow night when the Michelin Community House opens for the screen stars to entertain local people. A big crowd is expected to see the opening show in the borough. For the attraction here in the afternoon see the sporting page.


This Day in History: November 22, 1913

This Day in History: November 22, 1913

ORDINANCE TO WIDEN RIVE AVE. IS PASSED


MILLTOWN, Nov. 22.-An adjourned meeting of the Borough Council was held last evening. Mayor Conrad Richter presided. Councilmen Chas. Baurles, Henry Kuhlthau, Geo. E. Crabiel, Al Skewis, B. Miller, Clerk R. A. Harkins, Messrs. C. W. Waddington and R. B. Sheppard of the water commission board were present.

The following bills were ordered paid:

Chas. Hoffman. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 2.00

Home Insurance Co. . . . . . . . . . . $12.80

C. P. Stelle. . . . . . . .  . . . . . . . . . . $239.35

Mrs. John Lins was permitted to remove two trees in front of her property on Clay and Church streets The trees had been damaged by lightning.

A resolution approving the plans and specifications of the Sewer and Water Commission was adopted.

An ordinance regarding the widening of Riva avenue, from Main to Clay street was introduced passed on the first reading.

The ordinance provided that the borough would remunerate property owners for any damage that might be incurred and if agreement could not be made the Borough will have the right to condemn such property as may be necessary to obtain the desired width.

Prior to introduction of the above ordinance a petition from several property owners along the avenue was presented.

A resolution was adopted that the borough clerk post notice of intention for widening of the avenue in five of the most prominent places in the borough.

On motion the clerk was authorized to notify the railroad as to the condition of the crossing at Main street near the Michelin Tire Co.

The clerk was also authorized to notify the Board of Freeholders as to the condition of the bridge crossing Lawrence Brook.

The light committee was authorized to purchase a transformer for use in connection with the ventilating system at the school.

On motion the clerk was authorized to send a special notice to the property owners along Riva avenue, who have not as yet signed petitions for widening of said avenue.

Milltown to Have New Order.

C. H. Crenning, who is well versed in lodge work, has decided to use his best efforts towards instituting an Order of Owls in the borough, provided he can secure the necessary signers to the petition, which he is about to circulate. While the Order of Owls is practically now here in the East, it was founded at South Bend, Ind., in November, 1904. During its existence the growth has been marvelous, and branches of the order have been established in nearly every State in the Union as well as through Canada. Nearly 1,900 nests have been instituted with a membership of over 300,000.

The owls have a furnished home for their orphans where they educate them, at South Bend, Ind. They also have their own hospital. They now have a bill before Congress to set aside public land for a tuberculosis hospital and camp for the members of the order. They assist deserving widows of deceased members by a monthly pension. Their ritual; is beautiful and ennobling. They advocate no creed-nothing offensive to any man’s religion.

The special charter fee is $5 per member, and any one between the ages of 13 and 55 desiring to be- come a charter member may do so by singing the petition. After the charter is closed the regular initiation fee will not be less than $10; hence you can readily see the advisability of getting in on the ground floor.

The motto of the Order of Owls is as follows:

“There’s so much bad in the best of us,

And so much good in the worst of us,

It hardly behooves any of us

To speak ill of the rest of us.

They also have a toast, which reads as follows:

“Here’s to the man whose hand Is firm when he holds your own. Like a grip of steel that makes you feel

You’re not in the world alone.”

The new home of Charles Durham is nearing completion so far as the exterior is concerned.

Other Town Topics.

William Kuhlthau, Sr., is spending a few days at Morris Park, L. I. A reward of $10 has been offered. for information that will lead to the arrest of the parties that entered the building, adjoining Red Men’s Hall, and splattered paint, about the walls and floor.

At the Churches.

At the Methodist Church there will be special revival services, both morning and evening, and in the event of Miss Annie Agnes Smith, the evangelist, not putting in an appearance, Rev. L. L. Hand will occupy the pulpit. There is, however a likelihood of Miss Smith being able to take up her duties here tomorrow.

At the German Reformed Church there will be memorial service in the morning at 10.30, and members of families that have been bereaved during the past year are especially requested to be present. Sunday school will be held at 9.30 a. m. as usual. Young People’s Society will meet at 7 o lock and usual evening service will be held at 7.30. there will be services held on thanksgiving Day at 10.30 a. m.


This Day in History: October 11th 1919

This Day in History: October 11th 1919

Russell Playing Card Co. at Milltown Gives Employees Shorter Hours


The Russell Playing Card Company needs no introduction to the public, especially to New Brunswick people. Their employees receive consideration in so many ways and such a high standard is maintained for them that this company has won a well deserved reputation for being a splendid one to work for, as the 200 employees there, mostly girls, will testify.

For a long time It has been the custom of this company to furnish hot coffee to employees, and rubbers and umbrellas to the girls on rainy days, and recently they have issued cards announcing new rules that will Interest and please their employees, in regard to shortening the hours of work, though no reduction in wages will follow.

The president of the Russell Playing Card Company, Mr. Benjamin Rosenthal, of New York, is a man with progressive ideas and the ability to carry them out. This is well demonstrated by the fact that in the eight years of Mr. Rosenthal’s management of the Russell company it has grown constantly and surely into one of the leading independent playing card industries of the country.

This is the notice just issued to their employees by the Russell company:

Beginning Monday, October 18, the hours of employment will be 7.45 a. m. to 12 noon, and from 12.43 noon to 5.30 P.M.  Saturdays, from 7.45 a. m. to 12.45 noon.

There will be no reduction In wages. The same wages will be paid for this shorter work day as we are now paying for the present one.

Bonus systems are being installed In all departments as far and as rapidly as possible. In reducing the hours of employment without any decrease in wages, the management hopes all employees will be stimulated to greater effort, so that production may be increased and greater efficiency manifested throughout.

RUSSELL PLAYING CARD COMPANY. October 8, 1019.


This Day in History: September 9th, 1912

This Day in History: September 9th, 1912

FELL FROM BALCONY AND IS BADLY HURT

Edward Gallagher Sustains Fractured Skull and is Rushed to St. Peter’s Hospital Still in a Critical Condition.


MILLTOWN, Sept. 9.-Edward Galligan, the popular and genial clerk of the Hotel Marguerite, met with a serious injury early Sunday morning. when he fell from the upper balcony of that hotel to the pavement below, landing on his head and back

Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Sayre retired late Saturday night, but were awakened at 1.30 on Sunday morning by a ringing of the doorbell. It was George Lewin, who had seen the man fall and had given the warning.

Mr. Sayre quickly came out and carried Gallegan into the hotel, and & trolley car was sent to bring Dr. Forney, who arrived soon after. He advised that he be taken to the hospital and a special car took the injured clerk to St. Peter’s Hospital New Brunswick, where he is still in critical condition.

Robert St. John, a nephew of Mrs. Elmer Sayre, whose room fronts upon the balcony. Was awake when Galligan went out to take smoke before retiring. He says that the clerk took a seat upon the railing and was warned by him that he would fall although he leaned against a pillar with both arms clasped about his head and also around the pillar. He was probably very tired after a hard day’s work at the hotel and cloud of. The fall Was witnessed by St. John, who said that the body descended with a rotary motion, which probably saved him from instant death.

The many friends of the clerk wish for him A speedy recovery.

FIREMEN HAVE CLAM BAKE

MILLTOWN, Sept. 9. The clam bake of Eureka Fire Company No. 1, held in Miller’s Grove yesterday. Was well attended and was considered a great success

The married men, ably coached by Wm. Killern, were only the victors over the single men in an interesting game of baseball.

The German Reformed Church is planning to celebrate its fortieth anniversary, which falls in the middle of October.

Mises Barbara and Lena Lins of New Brunswick, were the guests of Miss Kuhlthau, yesterday.

Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Brown, of New Brunswick were Sunday guests in the borough

Miss Anna Latcher, of Brooklyn, was the guest of Miss Susie  Crabiel

Arthur Intemann, of New Brunswick, was a borough great last evening.

The French “dancing party,” held at Milltown Park on Saturday night, was well attended and proved to be a great success.

A Feed and Grain Business

With the erection of a 30 by 60 building the Kuhithau Brothers are -launching into the feed and grain business. This is not an entirely new project to them as for several years they have been carrying on & small feed business, but now they are greatly enlarging their facilities and will sell at retail and wholesale

John Christ, of South Amboy, was the rest of his parents, Mr. and Adam Christ, over Sunday. Miss Grace Farmer, of South River,  was the guest of Miss Ella Prill, over the week-end.


This Day in History: August 16th, 1915

This Day in History: August 16th, 1915

LATE PASSENGERS WERE STALLED

Local People Suffer Because of Trouble Caused in Past by Rough Element – Misunderstanding Leads to Embarrassing Situation.


Fully fifty New Brunswickers were stranded at the Milltown car barns, Saturday evening as they were unable to reach this city by trolley. Not being able to secure rooms in the borough they had to be contented with sleeping in the waiting room at the car barns which accommodated about ten. The passengers were provoked with the treatment accorded them by the employees of the Public Service who refused to take them to this city

The passengers boarded the trolley a South Amboy, it being the last car out of the city which only goes as far as the car barns. The trolley went at a fast pace and jumped the track at Yate’s corner South River. After considerable difficulty, the car was jacked up and placed back on the tracks. The passengers were greatly shaken up some being tossed from their seats,

The conductor collected the full fare from South Amboy to New Brunswick which entitled them to ride to this city. The passengers presuming that the car would proceed to New Brunswick, paid the last fare without a murmur.

Arriving at the car barns, a car swung out with several motormen and conductors aboard. Several of the passengers alighted from the South Amboy Car and dashed to the New Brunswick-bound car anticipating a ride to this city. Several got aboard but many more were not so fortunate. The conductor prevented several from jumping aboard the moving car telling them that the car would stop as soon as he swung out of the car barns. As soon as the car swung from the barns the motorman put on more speed and left the crowd standing in front of the barns.

Other Side of Story.

The Public Service side of the story was given to the Home News to-day to the effect that the company…

CONTINUED ON PAGE TWO.

had no intimation that there were to be New Brunswickers on the 1 a. m. trolley out of South Amboy, which is due to run only as far as the Milltown car barns, and it is stated that ample accommodations would have been made if such knowledge had been given to the Public Service.

It was about 2.30 a. m. that the trouble occurred at Milltown, and it is said that much of it was due to a rough element that had hung around the car barns with the expressed purpose of riding to New Brunswick on the car which brings the trolleymen to their homes here and which the company is not obliged to run, but does so simply to accommodate their workmen.

So much disorder was shown by this rough element that the car barn employees had to send for the Milltown officers, fearing damage to the property. It is said that a number of men make a practice of remaining in Milltown every Saturday night to ride home on the trolleymen’s car and when the large crowd tried to board it Saturday night the crews were fearful of what might happen en route.

It was not until afterward that the company learned that there were a number of very respectable people in the car that left South Amboy at 1 a. m., and who were stalled at Milltown, and it is said a special car would have been dispatched to Milltown to bring them to New Brunswick if one of them had telephoned to the office here.

Extra cars had been running from South Amboy on Saturday night, the last ones leaving there for through trip at 12.15 Sunday morning.


August 2022: Milltown’s Iconic Landmark Water Tower and Smokestack to be Demolished!

August 2022: Milltown’s Iconic Landmark Water Tower and Smokestack to be Demolished!

While it may be said by some that this headline is utterly untrue, the fact is that without public outcry today these structures are in the direct path of the Milltown Ford Avenue Redevelopment Authority’s (MFARA) current legal framework. As of right now the current Ford Avenue Redevelopment Plan as amended in 2021 includes the following language with regard to open space…

            “Delivery of Open Space and Development Parcel: Demolition of

Buildings and Structures. Any and all structures or buildings, parking lots,

sidewalks, walkways, asphalt or concrete pads, and any abandoned below grade

piping, conduit or utility appurtenances, situated on the Open Space Parcel, shall

be removed and/or demolished by Developer. The cost of the demolition on the

Open Space Parcel and Development Parcel shall be shared 50/50 between the

Developer and the County….”

Looking at the conceptual plan it was reasoned and confirmed at a recent meeting of MFARA that one of the proposed building sites would sit at the location of the landmark structures in question.

It is true that there are numerous paths forward to save these structures. Options include the immediate creation of a Historic Preservation Commission to give authority over the designation of historic properties in the borough, the amendment to the four-party agreement, State Historic designation, and or lobbying of your elected officials. It is my opinion that it is too burdensome for the developer to keep the structures and maintain them. With the political will of both local Borough officials and the Middlesex County Commissioners who have the absolute authority to approve the location of the Open Space boundary. It is reasonable for them to ensure that not all structures within the county Open Space are demolished. Such a decision would benefit the residents of the State of New Jersey, Middlesex County, and the Borough of Milltown, as they could retain these landmarks, while also reducing the cost burden of the developer to unnecessarily demolish such iconic structures and the last remaining vestige of Milltown cultural contribution to the United States rubber industry and its own working-class roots.

For a timed video of the recent Milltown Ford Avenue Redevelopment Authority’s meeting where this was discussed see below for a YouTube link.

To contact your local leaders follow the links below.

Middlesex County commissioners.

https://www.middlesexcountynj.gov/government/board-of-county-commissioners

Milltown Ford Ave Redevelopment Agency

http://www.milltownnj.org/261/Ford-Ave-Redevelopment-Agency


Written by: Randy Ruth – August 2022