This Day in History: September 22, 1924

This Day in History: September 22, 1924

LADIES’ AID OF MILLTOWN NOW IN FIRST PLACE

Wins Special Award and Passes Highland Park Eastern Star

COUPONS GIVEN THREE MORE DAYS


The Ladies Aid of St. Paul’s Church of Milltown went into first place in the week-end tabulation of the votes in the popularity contest of the women organizations in Middlesex and Somerset counties under the auspices of the New Brunswick merchants, theaters and Board of Trade. The Milltown organization was awarded first prize in last week’s shopping and was given credit for 3,000 votes and first place in the contest.

The St. John’s Rosary Society was given second prize of 2,000 votes and moves into fourth place, one, position above the Lady Foresters, No. 8. The 6,000 votes are awarded by the Sunday Times to the organizations whose members shop in the greatest number of stores on Monday of each week.

The Eastern Star, Highland Park Chapter, which has held down First place for many weeks, drops Into second place by virtue of the 3,000 vote credit to the Ladies’ Aid of Milltown. The Milltown organization now has a total vote of 51,470, While Eastern Star is credited with 48,824 votes.

The Ladies’ Auxiliary of Anshe Emeth Temple retains third position with 37,067 votes, and St. John’s Rosary is in fourth place with 33,784, while the Lady Foresters, No. 8, are in fifth, place with 32,067 votes.

The organizations have three more days in which to compete for the $600 in cash prizes. Coupons will be given by the merchants today, Wednesday and next Monday. The contest managers announce that they will receive the votes up until October 2. When the curtain will be rung down on the contest.

The standing in the contest follows:

Ladies’ Aid – St. Paul’s Church Milltown – 51470

Eastern Star, Highland Park Chapter – 48,824

Ladies Auxiliary Anshe Emeth Temple – 37,067

St. John’s Rosary Soc. – 33,871

Golden Rod Council No. 20 – Daughters of America – 20,401

Y. W. C. A. – 17,573

Catholic Daughters, Court Loretta – 16,655

Hebrew Ladies’ Aid Soc. – 13,628


This Day in History: September 9th, 1912

This Day in History: September 9th, 1912

FELL FROM BALCONY AND IS BADLY HURT

Edward Gallagher Sustains Fractured Skull and is Rushed to St. Peter’s Hospital Still in a Critical Condition.


MILLTOWN, Sept. 9.-Edward Galligan, the popular and genial clerk of the Hotel Marguerite, met with a serious injury early Sunday morning. when he fell from the upper balcony of that hotel to the pavement below, landing on his head and back

Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Sayre retired late Saturday night, but were awakened at 1.30 on Sunday morning by a ringing of the doorbell. It was George Lewin, who had seen the man fall and had given the warning.

Mr. Sayre quickly came out and carried Gallegan into the hotel, and & trolley car was sent to bring Dr. Forney, who arrived soon after. He advised that he be taken to the hospital and a special car took the injured clerk to St. Peter’s Hospital New Brunswick, where he is still in critical condition.

Robert St. John, a nephew of Mrs. Elmer Sayre, whose room fronts upon the balcony. Was awake when Galligan went out to take smoke before retiring. He says that the clerk took a seat upon the railing and was warned by him that he would fall although he leaned against a pillar with both arms clasped about his head and also around the pillar. He was probably very tired after a hard day’s work at the hotel and cloud of. The fall Was witnessed by St. John, who said that the body descended with a rotary motion, which probably saved him from instant death.

The many friends of the clerk wish for him A speedy recovery.

FIREMEN HAVE CLAM BAKE

MILLTOWN, Sept. 9. The clam bake of Eureka Fire Company No. 1, held in Miller’s Grove yesterday. Was well attended and was considered a great success

The married men, ably coached by Wm. Killern, were only the victors over the single men in an interesting game of baseball.

The German Reformed Church is planning to celebrate its fortieth anniversary, which falls in the middle of October.

Mises Barbara and Lena Lins of New Brunswick, were the guests of Miss Kuhlthau, yesterday.

Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Brown, of New Brunswick were Sunday guests in the borough

Miss Anna Latcher, of Brooklyn, was the guest of Miss Susie  Crabiel

Arthur Intemann, of New Brunswick, was a borough great last evening.

The French “dancing party,” held at Milltown Park on Saturday night, was well attended and proved to be a great success.

A Feed and Grain Business

With the erection of a 30 by 60 building the Kuhithau Brothers are -launching into the feed and grain business. This is not an entirely new project to them as for several years they have been carrying on & small feed business, but now they are greatly enlarging their facilities and will sell at retail and wholesale

John Christ, of South Amboy, was the rest of his parents, Mr. and Adam Christ, over Sunday. Miss Grace Farmer, of South River,  was the guest of Miss Ella Prill, over the week-end.


August 2022: Milltown’s Iconic Landmark Water Tower and Smokestack to be Demolished!

August 2022: Milltown’s Iconic Landmark Water Tower and Smokestack to be Demolished!

While it may be said by some that this headline is utterly untrue, the fact is that without public outcry today these structures are in the direct path of the Milltown Ford Avenue Redevelopment Authority’s (MFARA) current legal framework. As of right now the current Ford Avenue Redevelopment Plan as amended in 2021 includes the following language with regard to open space…

            “Delivery of Open Space and Development Parcel: Demolition of

Buildings and Structures. Any and all structures or buildings, parking lots,

sidewalks, walkways, asphalt or concrete pads, and any abandoned below grade

piping, conduit or utility appurtenances, situated on the Open Space Parcel, shall

be removed and/or demolished by Developer. The cost of the demolition on the

Open Space Parcel and Development Parcel shall be shared 50/50 between the

Developer and the County….”

Looking at the conceptual plan it was reasoned and confirmed at a recent meeting of MFARA that one of the proposed building sites would sit at the location of the landmark structures in question.

It is true that there are numerous paths forward to save these structures. Options include the immediate creation of a Historic Preservation Commission to give authority over the designation of historic properties in the borough, the amendment to the four-party agreement, State Historic designation, and or lobbying of your elected officials. It is my opinion that it is too burdensome for the developer to keep the structures and maintain them. With the political will of both local Borough officials and the Middlesex County Commissioners who have the absolute authority to approve the location of the Open Space boundary. It is reasonable for them to ensure that not all structures within the county Open Space are demolished. Such a decision would benefit the residents of the State of New Jersey, Middlesex County, and the Borough of Milltown, as they could retain these landmarks, while also reducing the cost burden of the developer to unnecessarily demolish such iconic structures and the last remaining vestige of Milltown cultural contribution to the United States rubber industry and its own working-class roots.

For a timed video of the recent Milltown Ford Avenue Redevelopment Authority’s meeting where this was discussed see below for a YouTube link.

To contact your local leaders follow the links below.

Middlesex County commissioners.

https://www.middlesexcountynj.gov/government/board-of-county-commissioners

Milltown Ford Ave Redevelopment Agency

http://www.milltownnj.org/261/Ford-Ave-Redevelopment-Agency


Written by: Randy Ruth – August 2022

This Day In History: August 6, 1913

This Day In History: August 6, 1913

HURT WHEN TROLLEY CAR JUMPS TRACK

John Funk and Motorman Carter, of Milltown, Have Miraculous Escapes in a Peculiar Accident at Berdine’s Corner, Scene of Fatal Accident – Passenger Caught in Wreck


In exactly the same spot, and in very much the same manner, where Edward McKeon, a trolley conductor, of this city, met his death a year ago. John Funk, of Milltown, a bookkeeper at the plant of the Enameled Brick and Tile Company at South River, received Injuries at 1:20 this morning, when a trolley car on which he was a passenger, left the tracks at Berdine’s Corner, while going at high speed, and crashed into a telegraph pole.

Funk’s Injuries are not serious, and consist of an injury to the leg. and severe bruises about the body He had a miraculous escape from death or serious injury. As did Motorman Carter of the car.

Carter is a resident of keyport, but boards at Milltown. He has been motorman but short time. The car which came to grief at the corner which has been the scene of several accidents, left here at 1 o’clock. As is the custom the car was speeding on the George’s Road track. Motor man Carter says that he applied the brakes before coming to the turn, and that they refused to work. though they had been working well previously. The car jumped the track, and a few second later the body of the car left the trucks, and crushed sideways into a telegraph pole. The car fell and the pole smashed in the top of the car. At the time of the incident Funk was talking to Conductor Channatti. and he was sitting well toward the front of the car. Had he been in t the center or the rear, he would probably have been badly injured or killed.

The car was a complete wreck, and Funk was compelled to crawl out of the wreckage. Motorman Carter stuck to his port, and he also had to fight his way out. He kicked out the front windows of the vestibule, and crawled out. The conductor escaped injury.

Over a year ago an early morning car left the tracks at the same turn, and conductor Mckeon was almost instantly killed. That time there were no passengers on the car. This morning Funk was the only passenger.


This Day In History: July 20th, 1919

This Day In History: July 20th, 1919

SOLUTION OF THE MUNICIPAL EXPANSION PROBLEM GIVEN BY NOTED EXPERT ON CIVIC IMPROVEMENT


Select a committee of dynamite men who have the confidence of the community: let them name an energetic committee to carry out any plan decided upon by the original committee; secure the services of an expert to aid in the work determined upon; and have a survey made of existing’ conditions so as to determine the best course to pursue.

This was the solution of the municipal expansion problem presented to the people of Milltown, at the second meeting of the Milltown Chamber of Commerce held in the Borough Hall last Wednesday night, by Mr. Perry R. MacNeille, an expert in civic planning who has done much to aid the government in the housing proposition, and pioneer in city building. Mr. Mac Nellie was secured through The Sunday Times, which has taken a great interest in the question of civic development, not only with regard to New Brunswick but also with the view of presenting ideas and making suggestions that would aid other communities in making their municipalities better places to live in.

Following Mr. Mac Neille’s address the Milltown Chamber of Commerce, of which Mr. H. R. B. Meyers is president, voted to have a survey made in accordance with the plan suggested by the speaker. What he said in his very practical talk to the people of this borough will apply to any community and if followed out will prove beneficial to other municipalities.

Planning Too Much.

In discussing the question of “Municipal Expansion,” the title he gave to his talk, Mr. Mac Neille said it was a great mistake to mass up too great a quantity of things one would like to do and not do anything. The great danger of a meeting of this sort was that one got an inspiration to do thinks but this often wasted itself away before anything material resulted.

“Be slow to determine the thing to be done and be rapid in setting the energies at work to do it,”

Mr. Mac Neille said he lived in a suburban community of New York where he went to rest and sleep. His business was in New York and it made no difference to him how long the town remained as dead as it was so long as it did hot become deader.

“But those of you who are in business here,” declared Mr. MacNeille, “are irrevocably committed to the program of civic expansion. Your success or failure, your happiness or misery, is tied up in this town. The majority of you cannot leave Milltown

“And no matter what your business is, no matter where your market your business cannot grow unless the town grows.”

He was sorry to say, however, that the storekeepers too often happened to be the blind ones in the matter of civic expansion, that the manufacturers, whose market was outside of the town, were not always the wideawake ones and the storekeepers were the laggards.

What Live Men Can Do.

As an illustration of the possibilities of a wide-awake Chamber of Commerce, Mr. Mac Neille referred to Pittsburg. There, upon the development of the steel industry at Gary, it was found business was decreasing and people were moving away. The Chamber of Commerce was a live and set to work to overcome this situation. They sent representatives to South America and Russia to get information First handed as to the possibilities of a market there for the products  of Pittsburg. They prepared a book in encyclopedia form, giving an alphabetical list of all the industries of the city and what each manufactured. A copy of this book was placed in the hands of every American consul so that at a glance, upon inquiry being made of him as to where various materials could be obtained, he could furnish the address of the manufacturer in Pittsburg

They also sent $40,000 for a survey in relation to housing, parks, recreation and so on, with the result that Pittsburg is the prosperous city it is today. This showed what a live, energetic Chamber of commerce could do.

Studying the Problems.

The speaker then dwelt upon the necessity of the various problems being adequately studied in order to secure success. There was an opportune time for everything and sometimes it paid to put off the doing of a thing till tomorrow rather than to start it today. Conditions might be better at a later date and twice the energy then aroused than if the undertaking was started at once.

He also cautioned his hearers that if they waited to do a thing, however, until a time when it could be done perfectly it would never be done. There is nothing in this world perfect. The writer of a book had once, he said, withheld its publication for forty years in order that it might be perfect in every detail. It was concerning the life of a king and he had been unable to find out just what the king had done during two weeks of his career. After these many years he found the king had really done nothing at all of interest during that missing period. He had made a trip and stopped along at various points along the way. Yet the world lost the benefits of this book for 40 years in order to make it perfect. Their purpose should be not solely that of making money and of making goods but the rendering of a social service, the achievement of which would place them head and shoulders above all their neighbors.

Task For Milltown.

The task for Milltown, as he saw it was to select first a committee of dynamic men, men who had a vision, men who had the confidence of the community. They should be selected very carefully and should be men who, if they say it is wise for Milltown to do a certain thing the citizens will also say it is wise and support them.

This committee should select another committee of energetic, active men who, when a course is determined upon, will see to it that it is carried through. The services of an export would also be necessary, one who knows all the hitches likely to be encountered in the line of work determined upon and can guard against them so that everyone who works will know that he did something.

Importance of Survey.

Mr. MacNeille impressed upon the members of the Board the importance of making a survey so as to ascertain the economical, geographical and natural advantages, where the markets are, what new markets can be opened up and how old markets can be increased.

Sanitation was to be considered and plan necessary so as to prevent waste in the future, in some cities he said the streets grew wherever the cow wandered. In Altoona, he declared the brain of the engineer became weary and they laid the town out without any regard to future development with the result that some of the streets were so hilly that fire engines could not get up them. At Three Rivers streets were now being closed, because they were built in the wrong place, and new streets being laid to accommodate factories. All because of a lack of plan in the beginning.

A town also needed recreation with its playgrounds. It also needed recuperation. One enjoys a period of rest when he walks through beautiful streets, said Mr. Mac Neille, but he doesn’t get any rest when he walks through ashes.

“In riding through your town this afternoon, I was amazed at the beauty of the rear yards,” he said. “Everything was beautiful except the streets, and it needs so little to improve them the establishment of grade, the laying of a curb and the planting of a little grass.”

Estimating The Cost.

Just as the dressmaker, before starting to make a dress, gets a pattern to go by and estimates the cost so as to be sure her pocketbook will meet the needs, or an architect draws up a plan based upon a certain amount to be spent, so a city not only; makes a plan but prepares a budget so as to know where the money is to come from when needed.

“But money alone won’t build your city,” continued the speaker. Goodwill and good spirit are needed also. The town needs the spirit of all its citizens behind it. The wonderful accomplishments of America during the war was due to the energies of all being centered in winning the war. It is just so with a town. All minds must be centered upon the things to be accomplished to make them a success.”

Milltown, he said, was awake. It had a Chamber of Commerce which had just started out and was on the threshold of its accomplishments. The torch should be kept burning and carried forward. They not only should keep it burning and keep it moving out Keep the vigor there, giving it over to younger men when those carrying it had accomplished all they could. In this way Milltown would become the city pictured by many of those present.

Town To Decide.

Following his talk Mr. Mac Neille answered questions put to him by those in the audience. In reply to one questioner, he said it was up to the people of the town to decide upon what they wanted. They could tell in a general way what appealed to them, what they most missed. From all the suggestions made that favored by the majority should be chosen first and if the committee found it desirable and sanctioned it that made its success assured.

Mac Neille met a number of the residents of Milltown during his short stay there and was much interested in the town and its success. He found the people anxious to do whatever they could to develop the town. Everywhere there was a spirit needed to back up municipal development. That the townspeople appreciated his visit was shown by a standing vote of thanks given him at the Chamber of Commerce meeting.


This Day in History: July 13th, 1919

This Day in History: July 13th, 1919

MILLTOWN TO GET IDEAS ABOUT CIVIC PLANNING FROM NOTED EXPERT TO VISIT BORO WEDNESDAY


The second meeting of the Milltown Chamber of Commerce will be held Wednesday evening, July 16th, in Borough Hall there, when the very interesting plans and ideas discussed at the former meeting of that body will receive further attention and consideration.

The Sunday Times, which is greatly interested in the development of Milltown and sees wonderful possibilities for this town, has secured a well-known authority on city planning and civic improvement to address the meeting Wednesday evening. He is Mr. Perry R. Mac Nellie, who will give constructive suggestions for the improvement of Milltown along the best lines.

“He is Mr. Perry R. Mac Nellie, who will give constructive suggestions for the improvement of Milltown along the best lines.”

The Sunday Times – July 13th, 1919

Has Had Long and Varied Experience

Mr. Mac Neille has had a career that well fits him for the high position he now occupies in the engineering world. He studied first at Columbia University, and followed these studies by- a series of investigations in Europe in the field of industrial housing, engineering and architecture. He has been a member of the engineering corps of the N. Y, N, H. & H. Railroad and also carrying on extensive real estate and land surveys covering immense projects, besides being employed as, a structural engineer for many large and notable Buildings.

In Partnership With Horace B. Mann

About twenty years ago he formed a partnership with Horace B. Mann, and the firm of Mann & Mac Neille was started with offices in New York and Chicago. In the ensuing years, in addition to the regular line, the firm has specialized in industrial housing, municipal expansion, zoning and other city planning; among the many industrial housing projects developed has been that of the Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company at Akron, Ohio.

Active War Work

When Dean Herman Schneider of the university of Cincinnati was asked to establish the Industrial Service Section of the Ordnance Department he requested the services of Mr. Mac Neille to organize and direct a Housing Branch of the Ordnance Department. Under Mr. Mac Neille’s direction all housing activities of the Ordnance Department for a period of approximately one year were carried on, and the firm of Mann & Mac-Neille was retained as consulting architects. The work entailed not only layout of villages and design of houses, but careful study of community facilities and activities together with analyses of industrial and civic conditions in active centers in practically every section of the country.

Well Fitted to Advise

It may easily be seen from the foregoing that Mr. Mac Neille is well qualified to talk about matters pertaining to the development of towns and cities. No citizen of Milltown should fail to hear him at the meeting there Wednesday evening. Milltown has opportunity to become the “best looking town” (if we may use such words in connection with a community) that New Jersey boasts. In fact it has a chance to become a city.

Milltown has opportunity to become the “best looking town” … that New Jersey boasts. In fact it has a chance to become a city.

The Sunday Times – July 13th, 1919

Mr. Perry R. Mac Nellie