This Day in History: November 24th, 1920

Michelin tire Promotional Postcard 1910

LIQUOR SALES AT MILLTOWN HIT BY COMMERCE BOARD


MILLTOWN, Nov. 24-The first luncheon-meeting of the Milltown Chamber of Commerce was held last evening at the Michelin Cafeteria which proved to be one of the most interesting meetings ever held by this body. A feature of the gathering was the condemnation of the borough’s present “wide-open” condition.

Those present were: Frank G. Boyce, J. M. Crabiel, H. A. Christ, W. R. Evans, E. V. Emens, J. P. Herbert. Ida J. Hermann, William S. Hannah, J. H. Junker, J. Knoll. Jr., M. Kropp. John Klotzbach, C. Kuhlthau, K. Kuhlthau, W. H. Kuhlthau, C. W. Kuhlthau, Geo. Kuhlthau, Geo. Lowne, H. R. M. Meyers, Spencer Perry, C. C. Richter, C. M. Snedeker. Philip Simpson. Harold J. Schlosser, Addison Thompson. Fred Wagner, Charles Zimmerman, Mrs. Chas. Hodapp. Miss Susie Crabiel, Louis Slon. Irving Crabiel, Dr. S. F. Weston and Howard S. DeHart.

After the luncheon which was thoroughly enjoyed by all the regular meeting was indulged in, President John H. Klotzbach presiding. Clerk of the Board of Education Howard S. DeHart made the first address of the evening in presenting the business side of the Board of Education to those present, presenting the fact that the larger attendance, higher cost of textbooks, higher salaries paid teachers, etc., of today, have a great bearing on the great expense that is attached to our school today, especially calling attention that the transportation of our children which alone runs up as high as four thousand dollars in the course of a year. Mr. DeHart urged the hearty co-operation of the folks of the town to insure proper training of the children.

Dr. S. F. Weston, supervising principal of the school, was the next speaker of the evening on the Relation of School to Education, what education does toward making for a safer democracy, and also how the social and recreational education of a child tends to develop that child in the higher and better methods of life. Dr. Weston dwelt upon the opportunities afforded today to the man or woman who has been properly prepared for life by means of an education.

The fact was brought out as to following out the methods of instruction as laid down by the State and that the local school is complying with all requirements of the State body with exception of the fact that there is no domestic science department at this time. The reason being given that up to this time there has not been sufficient room, and secondly, the Board of Education did not feel financially able to put on any more expense than they were absolutely compelled o at this time.

The fact was also brought out during the discussions that while a four-room addition is being added to the present school structure it will not be many years before more room will be required. The Clerk stated in fact that if it was not for the high cost of building materials and Labor a new eight-room school would have been asked for at this time instead of only a four room addition to the present building.

The second question on the calendar-Does Milltown get a share of fish and game in comparison with the licenses issued? Many of the sportsmen present did not think Milltown did get a fair share of game and upon the suggestion of those present a committee of three was appointed to make an investigation and report back to the Chamber at the next meeting, namely: Fish and Game Committee: Charles Zimmerman, Charles Snedeker, Harold J. Schlosser. The question of can Milltown have its own electrical inspector to insure better service in Milltown was thoroughly discussed and the sentiment was that Milltown should have its own inspector.

Who knows the police signal system? This question was spoken upon by chairman of the police committee of the borough council, Harold J. Schlosser who explained that if anyone desired a policeman at any time to call the Michelin Tire Company and they would be sure to find one of the town officers there at any time during the day and any time in the evening up to 11 30 o’clock. It was pointed out that an arrangement had been made some years ago with the Telephone Company so that the telephone operator would know just what course to pursue. By mutual consent the matter was left in the hands of the borough council for their consideration.

After a discussion of the trolley service being given to Milltown at present, the following resolution was adopted, the secretary being instructed to forward a copy to the superintendent at New Brunswick and also one copy to headquarters in Newark, namely:

Whereas, the Public Service Railway Company has recently placed in operation cars between Milltown and New Brunswick on a fifteen minute schedule.

“Resolved, that the Chamber of Commerce voice its approval of this progressive step, and that we extend our thanks to the Railway Company, and sincerely trust that this arrangement may continue in effect permanently to the mutual advantage of the Railway Company and the people of our community.

“Resolved further that it would also be very much appreciated if the “Milltown only cars” could be run as far as Heinz’ Switch so-as to give South Milltown residents service equal to that of North Milltown residents.

“Resolved further, that a copy of this resolution be forwarded to the General Manager of the Public Service Railway Company at Newark and a copy to the local superintendent at New Brunswick.”

Would a retail merchants association be of interest to Milltown business men was discussed favorably and the following committee was appointed to make investigation and report at the next meeting with the view of getting such an organization underway: Retail Merchants Committee: C. W. Kuhithau, F. G. Boyce, H. A. Christ.

Harry R. B. Meyers, ex-president of the Chamber of Commerce came out forcibly on the question of law and order, pointing out the amount of drunkenness in Milltown, the bold and open sales of liquor, the playing of poker, shooting of craps and the like. It was pointed out that there: is no time like the present for a general cleaning up in this respect and upon motion, the secretary was authorized to communicate to the Borough Council that the subject of law enforcement was thoroughly discussed at this meeting of the Chamber of Commerce and ask that the Council give the matter their very careful consideration.

Harold J. Schlosser, chairman of the police committee, was given an opportunity to express himself. He stated that there were violations of the law going on and only recently a crap game was raided but for some reason or other there was no publicity given the matter.

It was pointed out that a general. clean-up that would keep the town boys out of questionable games and pastimes would not only be in the town’s interest but in the interest of the boys themselves as far as their economic advancement is concerned.

It was also pointed out during the discussion that any organization that would permit gambling in its rooms. was not only a disgrace to the organization but to the town as well.

An editorial from one of the country newspapers setting forth a plan to gain information as to the attractiveness of a town by sending out a questionnaire to each member asking what induced them to come to the town in which they live was read by the secretary for future information of the Chamber.

Charles E. Denhard and Louis Sion were admitted into membership of the Chamber.

The Civic Department of the Chamber of Commerce reported that the Hallowe’en celebration was the most successful affair of its kind ever held in this section. The financial report of the celebration was as follows:

Amount of Collections

John Christ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00

Alfred Christ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5.00

Dr. Forney. . . . . . . .  . . . . . . . . . .  . .$5.00

C. W. Kuhlthau. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5.00

Buster Brown Shoe Store. . . . . . . . . $5.00

Hugo Laufer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2.00

Mrs. McGaughey. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2.00

Mrs. L. J. Hermann. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1:00

Frank Hodapp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5.00

Frank Hodapp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5.00

H. A. Christ Co…….. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5.00

Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $50.00

Expenses

Music for dancing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.00

Hall decorations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5.49

Red lights. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4.80

Prizes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $40.00

Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $82.29

The $50.00 collected having been used for payment of bills as indicated above, the following were or- dered paid out of the funds of the Chamber of Commerce to make up the deficit, namely:

J. M. Crablel, advances…. .$22.00

Estate C. Hodapp . . . . $4.80

Mae E. Kuhlthau, sundries… . . $5.49

Total . . . . . . . . . . .$32.29

General expenses were ordered paid

as follows:

C. Jensen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  $4.00

J. H. Junker, secretary, stamps

envelopes and post cards . . . . . . . $2.03

The following resolution was adopted:

“Whereas the Chamber of Commerce of the Borough of Milltown in regular session assembled at the Michelin Cafeteria are fully aware of the educational, recreational and social advantages that the Michelin Community House affords to the Borough of Hilltown, be it and it is hereby

“Resolved that a vote of thanks by the Chamber of Commerce be ex-tended to the Michelin Tire Company for their untiring efforts to make Milltown not only an attractive place to live but to work as well. “Resolved further that a copy of this resolution be sent to the Michelin Tire Company and that a copy be spread upon the minutes of this organization.”



Church Notices.

Tomorrow morning at the Re- formed Church John Schmidt will occupy the pulpit at 10:20 in a special Thanksgiving service. A special collection for the Middlesex Hospital of New Brunswick will be taken. All are cordially invited to attend.

Tonight will be Women’s Home Missionary night at the St. James Church, New Brunswick, and all local members are urged to attend the meeting.

The Women’s Republican meeting scheduled for tomorrow night has been postponed by the president, Mrs. Kuhlthau, and will be held next week. All members are asked to please vote.

Mr. and Mrs. Irving Crablel have returned from their wedding trip spent in the New England States.

Friday, December 10, has been set aside by the Reformed Church Ladies’ Aid Society for their annual Christmas sale in Fed Men’s hall.

The bazaar or fair now in progress by the local Catholic mission will close tonight and it will be the last chance to get some real Christmas gifts at real bargains. Dancing will

also be enjoyed. A large crowd was on hand last night.

Movies.

For the first time, Douglas Fairbanks will appear on the screen in Milltown tomorrow night when the Michelin Community House opens for the screen stars to entertain local people. A big crowd is expected to see the opening show in the borough. For the attraction here in the afternoon see the sporting page.


This Day in History: August 12, 1926

This Day in History: August 12, 1926

Milltown People Want Park, Municipal Swimming Pool

Hot Weather Brings Many, Suggestions for Relief; Suggest Park on Plot Across From Car Barns, Near Lawrence Brook


MILLTOWN, Aug. 12. These hot days make borough folk wish they had a swimming pool and public park at their disposal. More comment has been heard the past three days about a public park and a swimming pool in the borough than has been heard for months past. Milltown has two spots most ideal for such conveniences.

Milltown, according to some people, ought to make immediate arrangements to make summer life comfortable for borough folk and visitors. There are two spots that could be utilized to good advantage for public parks, and in one space a swimming pool could be erected. One man, in commenting on the idea last night, said he thought that the school playground should be fixed up and believed that it could be done with little expense. Right now the playground is in poor condition, so much, so that It is not practical for a public park, although with a little attention It could be converted into a very nice place. There are no benches on the ground, even though there are some trees that would afford shade. The grass Is not cut, but all this could be remedied and the place made more appealing. The ground could easily be leveled off. The suggestion of a pool in the playground Is not a new one, and with public support, which it would undoubtedly get, It could be made a realization by next year.

The other park space is the plot of ground bordering on the Lawrence Brook across from the old car barns. This is another apparently Ideal spot, and It is understood that the Raritan River Railroad Company will carry all the dirt necessary to fill In the space if the officials of the town would say the word. The delay is a waste of valuable time and if the railroad company is so willing to fill the place in. many people feel the borough officials surely ought to take them up on It. This has been hanging here for months.

Outing Tonight

The Milltown merchants will hold their annual outing tonight, when they will go to Soldier’s Beach and partake of a fish supper and take a dip Into the water.

Seldler’s Beach, Morgan and Laurence Harbor certainly were dense with borough folk last night, eager for a dip into the cooling waters. Evan the attractive pool at New Brunswick lured many Milltowners. Seldler’s, however, had first call for the crowd.

The Girl Scouts of the borough arranged at their meeting the other night at the home of Mrs, Charles Graullch, for their trip to Union Beach for one week. The girls will leave Saturday.

George Christ of the Michelin office is enjoying his vacation.

J. A. Montgomery and George Crablel attended the annual outing of the Past Councilors’ Association at Blue Hills Plantation yesterday.

The baseball attraction is Michelin vs. St. Mary’s of South River.


Correction: Yesterday it was transcribed as “Uatricks Corner” for the paper of the day. This has been corrected to read “Patrick’s Corner” to reflect the a much more realistic name and one which shows up in the record. The exact location is not known after some research on historic maps. However, newspapers of the day indicate that it may be in the vicinity of Fresh Ponds.


Today in History: March 10th 1925

Today in History: March 10th 1925

A NEW SCHOOL NEEDED?

The Daily Times: New Brunswick, N.J. Tuesday March 10th 1925


Milltown’s supervising principal’s report, read to the Board of Education on Thursday night at their monthly session, indicated that the enrollment in the school during the month of February had broken all previous records with the new figure of 587. The previous high water mark was 575, established in October of the present term. The enrollment increase in February is caused by the new classes of kindergarter children that are opened in midterm. The growth of the school is causing the members of the board considerable anxiety. At their session on Thursday, they had to consider their next move in the room proposition. Professor Mensch will give the board members at their June meeting a report of conditions he sees them at that time, and a rough sketch of what will be required for the youngsters in the fall. There seems no way to dodge the issue and it will either be a case of building an annex to the present twenty-room structure, or building, as contemplated, a temporary building of portable design that can be converted into cash when they want to dispose of it. With 587 pupils on hand now, only a small graduating class going out in June, and several youngsters coming in in September, the situation for space will be acute. The present graduating class is the smallest in years and will be the smallest in years to come.