This Day in History: August 3rd, 1911

This Day in History: August 3rd, 1911

FIRE APPARATUS FOR MILLTOWN

Will Be Exhibited at Fireman’s Picnic on August 5


MILLTOWN. Aug. 3. At 4 o’clock yesterday afternoon the new fire apparatus recently purchased by the borough from Boyd Brothers, of Philadelphia, for $4,100 arrived in the borough. On the truck was a chauffeur and representative of the firm and Mayor Conrad Richter, who, being anxious for fire protection in the borough, did much in bringing about the purchase of the truck.

The apparatus certainly made a fine appearance as it came through the borough yesterday. The body of the truck is red with yellow trimmings and on the front in large letters is the name of Milltown’s first fire company. On the truck are two chemical tanks, several feet of hose, extension ladders and hooks, which make a complete outfit.

The truck is propelled by motor power and is capable of making from 20 to 25 miles an hour. The body is set upon an autocar chassis. It is equipped with solid rubber tires.

The apparatus will be on exhibition on Saturday, August 5, when the firemen will hold their first grand picnic at Milltown Park. The day promises to be one of the greatest days of celebration in the history of the borough. The dancing will begin at the park at 3 p. m. and will continue until midnight. At 7 p. m. the officials of the borough. In automobiles, and the firemen will form a parade, preceded by the Milltown Fife, Drum and Bugle Corps. The line of march has not as yet been determined, but will include the principal streets of the borough.

But this- – pageant is not all. After dark there will be a grand display of fireworks at the park, which will attract many.

Saturday will be almost a holiday in the borough. It is thought that business places will close in the early afternoon in honor of the firemen. Houses will be gayly decorated with flags and bunting.

Complimentary tickets have been sent to the fire companies of New Brunswick and a record-breaking crowd is expected.


This Day in History: August 1st, 1910

This Day in History: August 1st, 1910

DECLARE CITIZEN HALTED JUSTICE / BOYS DELAY TRAIN

Exciting Scene When as Unlicensed Peddler is Protected From Justice by a Friend in Milltown.


MILLTOWN, Aug 1. The councilmen of the borough have a hard problem before them. How are they to enforce an ordinance that has been passed for a year when private citizens interfere? The councilmen for a long time have been trying to enforce an ordinance, protecting the merchants of the borough, providing for the licensing of peddlers. At the last regular meeting the council laid especial stress on the ordinance and determined to have it enforced. As a result several peddlers have been forced to procure licenses and one has been arrested for neglect of the law.

On Friday evening last, a peddler entered the town and went to several in the borough and sold goods without having a license. Councilman Rappleyea made a complaint before Justice Headley and as the man was near by the Justice ordered him to come to his office.

Before the man could get to the office a resident of the borough suddenly became very friendly with tie peddler and rushing over to the Justice demanded his freedom on the ground of being a friend. The man did not stop at that but threatened the Justice and called him vile names, the Justice says.

Mr. Headlev was very much taken back both by the friendship existing between the two men and by the orders given to him by a private citizen. As there was no constable on hand to take the. two men in hand, he determined that with odds as they were it was best to let matters rest, and to prevent a scene on the street, the” peddler was permitted to take the next car out of town. It is doubtful whether the man will again try by the influence of his friend to sell goods without a license as he seemed quite relieved to escape.

BOYS DELAY TRAIN.

Ernest Sohlosser and Harry Christ, boys of about five years of age, were playing on the high trestle of the Raritan River Railroad recently when a train came in sight. Whether the boys were frightened or intended to stop the train is not known, but they kept their positions and the engineer by quick work brought the train to a standstill and led the boys from their dangerous play ground.


This Day in History: July 21st, 1918

This Day in History: July 21st, 1918

RESIDENTS OF MILLTOWN BOROUGH HONOR THEIR SOLDIER BOYS BY THE NOVEL DISPLAY OF NAMES


To our neighbors in Milltown must go the credit for a unique and decidedly appropriate tribute to the men who have left there for service in the army and navy an honor roll of the names of the men placed on a board 10 feet high in a prominent part of the town.

The idea was “first suggested in the borough council by C. V. L. Booream and referred to the War Relief Council, who completed the plans that finally resulted in the dedication of the honor roll board on July 4th, the council financing it

The ceremony was most impressive. The board was draped with two very, large flags and at a given signal two girls drew them aside disclosing the names in clear letters that may easily .be read from some distance. Speeches were made by different ones, among them being Samuel Hoffman, one of the four-minute speakers in New Brunswick.

This tribute of Milltown to her departed soldiers is one that cannot help but appeal to everyone as being a fine expression of the sentiments of the “home folks.” It is an act that will be appreciated and remembered by these men who have offered their all to their country. The sign seems to say, just as plainly as if the words were written on it in huge letters: “These are men from Milltown who have gone to fight for us; we are proud of them and are standing back of them to the limit.”

Here are the names in the order in which they appear on the Milltown honor list:  


S. Bridier, C. Bordel, L. Bernard, J. Bourgarde, J. P. Saury, P. Barrere, H. Belin, J. Bernard, P. Bartherottte,  L. Bondee, S. Brickman, W. Barr, W. Bradley, H. J. Baier, C. Bluming, I. Bagoyne, P. Collins, Al. Christ, E. Collins, E. Chevalier, P. Cholet, T. Chardonnet, P. Coxie, R. Calledce, F. Cojean, E. Collet, L. Cannaff, F. Cretau, J. W: Dorn, J. P. Domas, L. Dheere, L. Decelle, M. David, L. Daviou, N. De Srnet, R. Evenou, F. Fleurant, M. Fichant, W. Galanias, J. Gaydier, C. Grand, L Corends. A. Grangemarre, H. Hartlander, C. Hartlander, G. Hartlander, M. Kulthau, C. M. Kulthau, L. LeGuillou. H. Okerson. J. Poigonec, G: Poigonec. F. Poupon, J. Magnet, J. Rupprecht, R . Rusellot, A. Renoux.

R. Richter, P. Schlumberger, P. Richards, Jr., P. Sheppard, C. Schwendeman, C. Villecourt, V. Troulakis, N. Suignard, A. Vauchez, N Van Voden. P. Ginelewet, J. Peflofky, G. Papas. Roy Reeves. R. Reeves, D. Romero, C. Syottonis, V. Van Canwenbuge, J. Genet, H. Fahrenholz, A. Anderson, J. P. Arvie, E. Gele, J. Gorgeon, R. Headley, J. Heimel, E. Jumet, M. Jegou, J. Kopetz, J. LeRoux, H. Meirose, S. Perry, Jr., J. Perry, L. Leroux, A. Pialoux, L. Mechan, A. J. Heim, J. Shea, N. Ropers, M. Queignec, E. Garde, R. Heimel, C Hughe, H. Kurmas, J. Kearborn, A. Lins, J. W. Lins, H. W. Lins, L. Mitton, W. Posekv, J. LaFaige, O. Haeg-ens, V. Laz, R. L. Walters, W. Wegant, J. Wegant, G. DeMontelleon, A. Dickinson, B. Christ, A. Wysems, G. Worthage, C. J. Weyde, A. Fabre, S. Farbat, Kupkrinski, F. Mather, N. Morzoraka, J. Poloski, J. Vandresitz, J. Zadusk, Ferdland R. Crabiel


This Day In History: July 20th, 1919

This Day In History: July 20th, 1919

SOLUTION OF THE MUNICIPAL EXPANSION PROBLEM GIVEN BY NOTED EXPERT ON CIVIC IMPROVEMENT


Select a committee of dynamite men who have the confidence of the community: let them name an energetic committee to carry out any plan decided upon by the original committee; secure the services of an expert to aid in the work determined upon; and have a survey made of existing’ conditions so as to determine the best course to pursue.

This was the solution of the municipal expansion problem presented to the people of Milltown, at the second meeting of the Milltown Chamber of Commerce held in the Borough Hall last Wednesday night, by Mr. Perry R. MacNeille, an expert in civic planning who has done much to aid the government in the housing proposition, and pioneer in city building. Mr. Mac Nellie was secured through The Sunday Times, which has taken a great interest in the question of civic development, not only with regard to New Brunswick but also with the view of presenting ideas and making suggestions that would aid other communities in making their municipalities better places to live in.

Following Mr. Mac Neille’s address the Milltown Chamber of Commerce, of which Mr. H. R. B. Meyers is president, voted to have a survey made in accordance with the plan suggested by the speaker. What he said in his very practical talk to the people of this borough will apply to any community and if followed out will prove beneficial to other municipalities.

Planning Too Much.

In discussing the question of “Municipal Expansion,” the title he gave to his talk, Mr. Mac Neille said it was a great mistake to mass up too great a quantity of things one would like to do and not do anything. The great danger of a meeting of this sort was that one got an inspiration to do thinks but this often wasted itself away before anything material resulted.

“Be slow to determine the thing to be done and be rapid in setting the energies at work to do it,”

Mr. Mac Neille said he lived in a suburban community of New York where he went to rest and sleep. His business was in New York and it made no difference to him how long the town remained as dead as it was so long as it did hot become deader.

“But those of you who are in business here,” declared Mr. MacNeille, “are irrevocably committed to the program of civic expansion. Your success or failure, your happiness or misery, is tied up in this town. The majority of you cannot leave Milltown

“And no matter what your business is, no matter where your market your business cannot grow unless the town grows.”

He was sorry to say, however, that the storekeepers too often happened to be the blind ones in the matter of civic expansion, that the manufacturers, whose market was outside of the town, were not always the wideawake ones and the storekeepers were the laggards.

What Live Men Can Do.

As an illustration of the possibilities of a wide-awake Chamber of Commerce, Mr. Mac Neille referred to Pittsburg. There, upon the development of the steel industry at Gary, it was found business was decreasing and people were moving away. The Chamber of Commerce was a live and set to work to overcome this situation. They sent representatives to South America and Russia to get information First handed as to the possibilities of a market there for the products  of Pittsburg. They prepared a book in encyclopedia form, giving an alphabetical list of all the industries of the city and what each manufactured. A copy of this book was placed in the hands of every American consul so that at a glance, upon inquiry being made of him as to where various materials could be obtained, he could furnish the address of the manufacturer in Pittsburg

They also sent $40,000 for a survey in relation to housing, parks, recreation and so on, with the result that Pittsburg is the prosperous city it is today. This showed what a live, energetic Chamber of commerce could do.

Studying the Problems.

The speaker then dwelt upon the necessity of the various problems being adequately studied in order to secure success. There was an opportune time for everything and sometimes it paid to put off the doing of a thing till tomorrow rather than to start it today. Conditions might be better at a later date and twice the energy then aroused than if the undertaking was started at once.

He also cautioned his hearers that if they waited to do a thing, however, until a time when it could be done perfectly it would never be done. There is nothing in this world perfect. The writer of a book had once, he said, withheld its publication for forty years in order that it might be perfect in every detail. It was concerning the life of a king and he had been unable to find out just what the king had done during two weeks of his career. After these many years he found the king had really done nothing at all of interest during that missing period. He had made a trip and stopped along at various points along the way. Yet the world lost the benefits of this book for 40 years in order to make it perfect. Their purpose should be not solely that of making money and of making goods but the rendering of a social service, the achievement of which would place them head and shoulders above all their neighbors.

Task For Milltown.

The task for Milltown, as he saw it was to select first a committee of dynamic men, men who had a vision, men who had the confidence of the community. They should be selected very carefully and should be men who, if they say it is wise for Milltown to do a certain thing the citizens will also say it is wise and support them.

This committee should select another committee of energetic, active men who, when a course is determined upon, will see to it that it is carried through. The services of an export would also be necessary, one who knows all the hitches likely to be encountered in the line of work determined upon and can guard against them so that everyone who works will know that he did something.

Importance of Survey.

Mr. MacNeille impressed upon the members of the Board the importance of making a survey so as to ascertain the economical, geographical and natural advantages, where the markets are, what new markets can be opened up and how old markets can be increased.

Sanitation was to be considered and plan necessary so as to prevent waste in the future, in some cities he said the streets grew wherever the cow wandered. In Altoona, he declared the brain of the engineer became weary and they laid the town out without any regard to future development with the result that some of the streets were so hilly that fire engines could not get up them. At Three Rivers streets were now being closed, because they were built in the wrong place, and new streets being laid to accommodate factories. All because of a lack of plan in the beginning.

A town also needed recreation with its playgrounds. It also needed recuperation. One enjoys a period of rest when he walks through beautiful streets, said Mr. Mac Neille, but he doesn’t get any rest when he walks through ashes.

“In riding through your town this afternoon, I was amazed at the beauty of the rear yards,” he said. “Everything was beautiful except the streets, and it needs so little to improve them the establishment of grade, the laying of a curb and the planting of a little grass.”

Estimating The Cost.

Just as the dressmaker, before starting to make a dress, gets a pattern to go by and estimates the cost so as to be sure her pocketbook will meet the needs, or an architect draws up a plan based upon a certain amount to be spent, so a city not only; makes a plan but prepares a budget so as to know where the money is to come from when needed.

“But money alone won’t build your city,” continued the speaker. Goodwill and good spirit are needed also. The town needs the spirit of all its citizens behind it. The wonderful accomplishments of America during the war was due to the energies of all being centered in winning the war. It is just so with a town. All minds must be centered upon the things to be accomplished to make them a success.”

Milltown, he said, was awake. It had a Chamber of Commerce which had just started out and was on the threshold of its accomplishments. The torch should be kept burning and carried forward. They not only should keep it burning and keep it moving out Keep the vigor there, giving it over to younger men when those carrying it had accomplished all they could. In this way Milltown would become the city pictured by many of those present.

Town To Decide.

Following his talk Mr. Mac Neille answered questions put to him by those in the audience. In reply to one questioner, he said it was up to the people of the town to decide upon what they wanted. They could tell in a general way what appealed to them, what they most missed. From all the suggestions made that favored by the majority should be chosen first and if the committee found it desirable and sanctioned it that made its success assured.

Mac Neille met a number of the residents of Milltown during his short stay there and was much interested in the town and its success. He found the people anxious to do whatever they could to develop the town. Everywhere there was a spirit needed to back up municipal development. That the townspeople appreciated his visit was shown by a standing vote of thanks given him at the Chamber of Commerce meeting.


This Day in History: July 14th, 1919

This Day in History: July 14th, 1919

MILLTOWN, July 14. Tonight is the time set to fittingly observe the independence of France In the borough when the French national holiday will be duly celebrated with a splendid program.

A street parade at 7 o’clock in which the war veterans of France will take a most prominent part, the local Red Cross of which every member Is asked to be In line with their usual costumes, the French school children and various other organizations along with the Michelin band will make up the line.

After the parade a patriotic meeting will be held at the Michelin Park at which Judge Peter F. Daly will speak, and Capt. Charles Reed, who was severely wounded in France, will give a description of the army life. Other numbers are on the program and the climax of the anniversary program will be a block dance on the ball diamond. This ought to be a splendid affair and everyone should turn out to celebrate the occasion.

Chamber of Commerce

Wednesday night is the regular meeting night of the Chamber of Commerce and arrangements have been completed to make this an unusually attractive meeting. The New Brunswick Sunday Times yesterday gave a fine description of the character and quality possessed for public speaking of the man who will address the meeting on Wednesday evening and all members, along with those who would like to join and citizens in general, are invited to come out and hear the good news that will come to the new borough developing body.

Off for Sea Girt

Elburn Matlack and Harold Glines of this place, left Saturday for Sea Girt, where they will train with the state militia men. both of the local men are members of Co. E of New Brunswick, and the trip down was made in Mr. Matlack’s car.

Arthur Foss, who has seen much thrilling war service in France, is spending a few days with his uncle. John Klotzbach, having arrived last week from overseas.

Installation of Officers

On Thursday evening of this week the installation of the newly elected officers will be held at the Daughters of Liberty lodge room and all members are asked to be present

Parade at 7 P.M.

The French Independence Day parade and celebration will take place promptly at 7 o’clock, and it is the desire of the committee to have a large representation of Milltown citizens In line two or three local organizations will march in a body, but the citizens at large are cordially invited to be on hand and to parade.

The local Red Men have planned to march in a body, and everybody is earnestly requested to meet at the clubhouse promptly at 6.45 o’clock.

Developing and printing for armatures done at Moore’s Drug Store All work guaranteed. Twenty-four hour service. Films and cameras on sale Moore s Drug Store. Red Men’s Building.

This Day in History: July 13th, 1919

This Day in History: July 13th, 1919

MILLTOWN TO GET IDEAS ABOUT CIVIC PLANNING FROM NOTED EXPERT TO VISIT BORO WEDNESDAY


The second meeting of the Milltown Chamber of Commerce will be held Wednesday evening, July 16th, in Borough Hall there, when the very interesting plans and ideas discussed at the former meeting of that body will receive further attention and consideration.

The Sunday Times, which is greatly interested in the development of Milltown and sees wonderful possibilities for this town, has secured a well-known authority on city planning and civic improvement to address the meeting Wednesday evening. He is Mr. Perry R. Mac Nellie, who will give constructive suggestions for the improvement of Milltown along the best lines.

“He is Mr. Perry R. Mac Nellie, who will give constructive suggestions for the improvement of Milltown along the best lines.”

The Sunday Times – July 13th, 1919

Has Had Long and Varied Experience

Mr. Mac Neille has had a career that well fits him for the high position he now occupies in the engineering world. He studied first at Columbia University, and followed these studies by- a series of investigations in Europe in the field of industrial housing, engineering and architecture. He has been a member of the engineering corps of the N. Y, N, H. & H. Railroad and also carrying on extensive real estate and land surveys covering immense projects, besides being employed as, a structural engineer for many large and notable Buildings.

In Partnership With Horace B. Mann

About twenty years ago he formed a partnership with Horace B. Mann, and the firm of Mann & Mac Neille was started with offices in New York and Chicago. In the ensuing years, in addition to the regular line, the firm has specialized in industrial housing, municipal expansion, zoning and other city planning; among the many industrial housing projects developed has been that of the Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company at Akron, Ohio.

Active War Work

When Dean Herman Schneider of the university of Cincinnati was asked to establish the Industrial Service Section of the Ordnance Department he requested the services of Mr. Mac Neille to organize and direct a Housing Branch of the Ordnance Department. Under Mr. Mac Neille’s direction all housing activities of the Ordnance Department for a period of approximately one year were carried on, and the firm of Mann & Mac-Neille was retained as consulting architects. The work entailed not only layout of villages and design of houses, but careful study of community facilities and activities together with analyses of industrial and civic conditions in active centers in practically every section of the country.

Well Fitted to Advise

It may easily be seen from the foregoing that Mr. Mac Neille is well qualified to talk about matters pertaining to the development of towns and cities. No citizen of Milltown should fail to hear him at the meeting there Wednesday evening. Milltown has opportunity to become the “best looking town” (if we may use such words in connection with a community) that New Jersey boasts. In fact it has a chance to become a city.

Milltown has opportunity to become the “best looking town” … that New Jersey boasts. In fact it has a chance to become a city.

The Sunday Times – July 13th, 1919

Mr. Perry R. Mac Nellie