This Day in History: August 12, 1926

This Day in History: August 12, 1926

Milltown People Want Park, Municipal Swimming Pool

Hot Weather Brings Many, Suggestions for Relief; Suggest Park on Plot Across From Car Barns, Near Lawrence Brook


MILLTOWN, Aug. 12. These hot days make borough folk wish they had a swimming pool and public park at their disposal. More comment has been heard the past three days about a public park and a swimming pool in the borough than has been heard for months past. Milltown has two spots most ideal for such conveniences.

Milltown, according to some people, ought to make immediate arrangements to make summer life comfortable for borough folk and visitors. There are two spots that could be utilized to good advantage for public parks, and in one space a swimming pool could be erected. One man, in commenting on the idea last night, said he thought that the school playground should be fixed up and believed that it could be done with little expense. Right now the playground is in poor condition, so much, so that It is not practical for a public park, although with a little attention It could be converted into a very nice place. There are no benches on the ground, even though there are some trees that would afford shade. The grass Is not cut, but all this could be remedied and the place made more appealing. The ground could easily be leveled off. The suggestion of a pool in the playground Is not a new one, and with public support, which it would undoubtedly get, It could be made a realization by next year.

The other park space is the plot of ground bordering on the Lawrence Brook across from the old car barns. This is another apparently Ideal spot, and It is understood that the Raritan River Railroad Company will carry all the dirt necessary to fill In the space if the officials of the town would say the word. The delay is a waste of valuable time and if the railroad company is so willing to fill the place in. many people feel the borough officials surely ought to take them up on It. This has been hanging here for months.

Outing Tonight

The Milltown merchants will hold their annual outing tonight, when they will go to Soldier’s Beach and partake of a fish supper and take a dip Into the water.

Seldler’s Beach, Morgan and Laurence Harbor certainly were dense with borough folk last night, eager for a dip into the cooling waters. Evan the attractive pool at New Brunswick lured many Milltowners. Seldler’s, however, had first call for the crowd.

The Girl Scouts of the borough arranged at their meeting the other night at the home of Mrs, Charles Graullch, for their trip to Union Beach for one week. The girls will leave Saturday.

George Christ of the Michelin office is enjoying his vacation.

J. A. Montgomery and George Crablel attended the annual outing of the Past Councilors’ Association at Blue Hills Plantation yesterday.

The baseball attraction is Michelin vs. St. Mary’s of South River.


Correction: Yesterday it was transcribed as “Uatricks Corner” for the paper of the day. This has been corrected to read “Patrick’s Corner” to reflect the a much more realistic name and one which shows up in the record. The exact location is not known after some research on historic maps. However, newspapers of the day indicate that it may be in the vicinity of Fresh Ponds.


This Day in History: August 4th, 1911

This Day in History: August 4th, 1911

RARITAN RIVER RAILROAD IS PROSPEROUS

Last Year Best Ever, Says Supt. Frank Hoffman, and This Year Will Go Ahead of That Road is But 21 Years Old.


Frank Hoffman, superintendent of the Raritan River Railroad, was in town to-day and told a Home News reporter that his line was enjoying the most prosperous period of its existence.

“Last year was the best ever for the road.” he said, “and the indications are that this one will be even better.”

The Raritan River Railroad is just a little over age, having been formally opened on January 6, 1890. Its beginnings were unpretentious, and as a passenger line it has never startled the universe, owing to the competition of the trolley from New Brunswick to South Amboy, but its freight business has grown enormously. The main line of the railroad to South Amboy is but a tiny fraction of its trackage, as switches miles in length branch off in every direction to the clay works along the south shore of the Raritan. It would take a full day to go over the entire system of this road.

To the Raritan River line Is due principally the remarkable growth of Milltown, South River and Sayreville, for furnishing a competitor to the Pennsylvania in freight business.

Superintendent Hoffman was formerly county detective of Middlesex, under Prosecutors Berdine and Booraem giving up the place to take charge of the railroad.


This Day in History: Feb. 4 1911

This Day in History: Feb. 4 1911

MILLTOWN POST OFFICE IS AGAIN ENTERED

Thieves for the Second Time in Two Weeks Attack Post Office, But Are Frightened Away -Burglars Enter Raritan River Station and Get Umbrella and Collar Buttons.


When Assistant Postmaster J. Milton Brindle opened the post office building on Main street, Milltown, this morning, he noticed that the sorting table had been moved from its accustomed place against the wall. He recognized at once the fact that the post office had been entered for the second time within two weeks. He immediately, began to make- investigations and found, that the burglars had been unsuccessful as far as booty was concerned and had left the building empty handed.

A HOLE IN THE SAFE.

After further search, he found a hole in the side of the safe about half in inch in diameter and six inches deep. Evidently the men had been, frightened before their boring was competed.

Mr. Brindle, when asked how the burglars bad effected an entrance, conducted the writer to the rear of the building. The bars had been, torn from the window in the rear by the means of shearing the bolts which held toe bars to the window.

There were two holes bored in the woodwork in the back of the safe. It is thought that the visitors hoped to affect an entrance for their powder in tins way without danger of being seen at work.

Mrs. Catherine Kuhlthau, the; mother of C. W. Kuhlthau, arose at1 4 a. m. and lighted a lamp. It is thought by some that a reflection cast by this lamp had caused the intruders-t o cease from their labors.

RARITAN RIVER R. R. OFFICE ENTERED

The ticket office of the Raritan River Railroad, on. Washington avenue was entered by a window last night and an umbrella, belonging to the agent, B. Sheppard, together with a paper of collar, buttons and 46 cents in stamp was taken.

Mr. Sheppard said this morning “Those men were gentleman, I have some expense papers, which are worth money lying on the desk. They, were opened, but not disturbed.”

The men entered the coal office of Kuhlthau Brothers and removed a wrench and chisel, but it seems that no close search was made for valuables.

Police protection for Milltown is now an imperative demand.