This Day in History: August 4th, 1911

This Day in History: August 4th, 1911

RARITAN RIVER RAILROAD IS PROSPEROUS

Last Year Best Ever, Says Supt. Frank Hoffman, and This Year Will Go Ahead of That Road is But 21 Years Old.


Frank Hoffman, superintendent of the Raritan River Railroad, was in town to-day and told a Home News reporter that his line was enjoying the most prosperous period of its existence.

“Last year was the best ever for the road.” he said, “and the indications are that this one will be even better.”

The Raritan River Railroad is just a little over age, having been formally opened on January 6, 1890. Its beginnings were unpretentious, and as a passenger line it has never startled the universe, owing to the competition of the trolley from New Brunswick to South Amboy, but its freight business has grown enormously. The main line of the railroad to South Amboy is but a tiny fraction of its trackage, as switches miles in length branch off in every direction to the clay works along the south shore of the Raritan. It would take a full day to go over the entire system of this road.

To the Raritan River line Is due principally the remarkable growth of Milltown, South River and Sayreville, for furnishing a competitor to the Pennsylvania in freight business.

Superintendent Hoffman was formerly county detective of Middlesex, under Prosecutors Berdine and Booraem giving up the place to take charge of the railroad.


This Day in History: Feb. 4 1911

This Day in History: Feb. 4 1911

MILLTOWN POST OFFICE IS AGAIN ENTERED

Thieves for the Second Time in Two Weeks Attack Post Office, But Are Frightened Away -Burglars Enter Raritan River Station and Get Umbrella and Collar Buttons.


When Assistant Postmaster J. Milton Brindle opened the post office building on Main street, Milltown, this morning, he noticed that the sorting table had been moved from its accustomed place against the wall. He recognized at once the fact that the post office had been entered for the second time within two weeks. He immediately, began to make- investigations and found, that the burglars had been unsuccessful as far as booty was concerned and had left the building empty handed.

A HOLE IN THE SAFE.

After further search, he found a hole in the side of the safe about half in inch in diameter and six inches deep. Evidently the men had been, frightened before their boring was competed.

Mr. Brindle, when asked how the burglars bad effected an entrance, conducted the writer to the rear of the building. The bars had been, torn from the window in the rear by the means of shearing the bolts which held toe bars to the window.

There were two holes bored in the woodwork in the back of the safe. It is thought that the visitors hoped to affect an entrance for their powder in tins way without danger of being seen at work.

Mrs. Catherine Kuhlthau, the; mother of C. W. Kuhlthau, arose at1 4 a. m. and lighted a lamp. It is thought by some that a reflection cast by this lamp had caused the intruders-t o cease from their labors.

RARITAN RIVER R. R. OFFICE ENTERED

The ticket office of the Raritan River Railroad, on. Washington avenue was entered by a window last night and an umbrella, belonging to the agent, B. Sheppard, together with a paper of collar, buttons and 46 cents in stamp was taken.

Mr. Sheppard said this morning “Those men were gentleman, I have some expense papers, which are worth money lying on the desk. They, were opened, but not disturbed.”

The men entered the coal office of Kuhlthau Brothers and removed a wrench and chisel, but it seems that no close search was made for valuables.

Police protection for Milltown is now an imperative demand.