This Day in History: September 19th, 1914

This Day in History: September 19th, 1914

KUHLTHAU HOME WAS SCENE OF A DELIGHTFUL PARTY

Watermelon Cut Was Feature of It – Streets to Be Watered Among Other Town News.

MILLTOWN, Sept. 19 — The spacious lawn adjoining the home of the Misses Anna and Alma Kuhlthau, on Main Street, Milltown, was the scene of a delightful watermelon party last evening. The act of watermelon cutting was a featured activity of the evening. Besides, there were many outdoor games indulged in, and the evening hours whiled away all too soon.

The lawn was beautifully adorned for the occasion, boasting an artistic array of Chinese and Japanese lanterns.

Those present were Misses Anna and Alma Kuhlthau, Mr. and Mrs. Christian Kelthau, Misses Stella and Hazel Borean, Miss Stella Helen DeHart, Harriet Mesars, Howard Booream, William Booream, Christian and J.H. Junker, Edwin and Christian Kultau, and Mr. and Mrs. Rateher.

Streets to be Watered

It is understood that negotiations are now underway between the borough officials and the Public Service Railway Co. to have a trolley sprinkler traverse the streets of the borough to settle the dust, which has been causing much discomfort throughout the town.

New Hat Next Year

If one of our prominent officials hadn’t worn his straw hat too many days over the straw hat limit, he would not have had to buy a new one next year. But now, his favorite top piece has been divided into two separate parts; the crown has no connection with the rims.

The official in question entered the local freight station recently, and as he was approaching the station, the entire force united to carry out the suggestion to remove the crown of the official’s hat should he enter, and succeeded.

Personals

Mrs. Willard Randolph of River Road was a Milltown visitor yesterday.

Mrs. J.M. Cumming and daughter Ruth, from San Francisco, were visitors at the home of William R. Evans yesterday.

At the Churches

At the German Reformed Church tomorrow, the Rev. William F. Barney will occupy the pulpit both in the morning and the evening. An English service will be held at 7:30 in the evening, preceded by the meeting of the Young People’s Society at seven o’clock. Sunday school will be held at the usual hour in the morning.

At the Methodist Church, the Rev. James W. Marshall, district superintendent, will occupy the pulpit in the morning and in the evening. Rev. L.L. Hand will be in charge. Rev. Hand has chosen “Owners-Mark” as his theme. Sunday school will be held at the usual hour in the afternoon, and the regular meeting of the Epworth League will take place at seven o’clock in the evening, under the leadership of the league president, Jos. M. Crabiel.

Convention here

At the W.C.T.U. meeting held at the home of Mrs. James Lyle on Thursday evening, arrangements were made to host delegates for the annual convention scheduled for Sept. 29th. This will be the fall convention of the Middlesex county W.C.T.U. The following officers were elected at the meeting: President, Mrs. J. Lyle; Vice President, Miss Man Huff; Second Vice President, Mrs. Elizabeth Crabiel; Recording Secretary, Mrs. Lester Snedeker; Financial Secretary, Miss Buste Crabiel; and Treasurer, Miss Mildred Stelle.

The L.C.S. gathered at the home of Miss Elizabeth Kuhlthau on Thursday evening. Rev. William F. Barney and Nicholas Christ are attending the Synod of the German Reformed Church in New York.

JUST MOVED TO MILLTOWN; DROPS DEAD IN FIELD

New Yorker Stricken With Apoplexy While Working in Hay Field; Leaves Behind Wife and Children

MILLTOWN, Sept. 19 — Charles Sohl, son-in-law of Henry Rathcamp, manager of the Milltown Street Department, had recently moved to Cottage Avenue, Milltown, from New York earlier this week. Unfortunately, he was stricken with apoplexy yesterday afternoon shortly after 3 o’clock while working in a hay field in North Milltown. Before an ambulance could reach his home, he passed away.

There were initial reports in Milltown last evening suggesting that Sohl had been sunstruck due to a sudden change in his work environment — transitioning from working in an artificial ice plant in New York City to loading hay. However, Dr. F.E. Riva, who was summoned to the scene, diagnosed the cause of death as apoplexy.

At the time of the incident, Sohl was working for contractor Christian Crabiel, loading hay on the Elkins farm with two other workmen, George Kohlhepp and Ferdinand Crabiel. Despite the efforts to rush him home via the Wells ambulance, he passed away before reaching Hooraem Avenue.

Sohl, who was 46 years old and weighed around 200 pounds, had a brief stay in Milltown, limiting the number of acquaintances he had in the area. Despite this, the community has expressed deep sympathy for his surviving family: his wife, Mrs. Annie Sohl, and their five children.

The funeral service will be held at his late residence on Cottage Avenue, Monday afternoon at 2 o’clock, officiated by Rev. W.F. Barney of the German Reformed Church. Undertaker Quackenboss is overseeing the arrangements.


This Day in History: September 14th, 1907

This Day in History: September 14th, 1907

THIEF RANSACKS MR. FONTAINE’S RESIDENCE
VICE PRESIDENT OF MICHELIN TIRE COMPANY


Vice-President Emile Fontaine’s residence on Main Street, Milltown, was burglarized last evening. The thief made off with jewelry and money, managing to escape without being detected.

Mr. Fontaine is the vice-president of the Michelin Tire Company and resides in the recently purchased Sine residence by Dr. Ferdinand Riva. The family retired at 10 p.m. The nurse and interpreter, Miss Anlee Holohan, was partially awakened by someone passing through her room before dawn. She also heard noises downstairs but, as she had asked the cook to wake her early, she didn’t pay much attention to it.

When the cook came downstairs at 6 o’clock this morning, she was startled to find the kitchen door wide open with the doormat in place, and the window screen on the steps. It was evident that the thief had entered through the window.

A thorough search of the house had been conducted, but some items were overlooked. One hundred dollars belonging to Miss Holohan had disappeared.

Clothing Stolen from His Room
Superintendent Fontaine noticed early this morning that his clothing was missing from his room but found it at the top of the stairs. His silver watch and chain, purchased in Paris, were gone. A silver dollar had been taken from his vest pocket, along with some loose change.

Mrs. Fontaine discovered a small decorative platter halfway down the stairs, and her silver watch, along with a fine long gold chain for her neck, was missing. The chain was valued at $32 in Paris. An old gold watch of English make and a gold brooch, both belonging to Miss Holohan, were also taken. These items held significant sentimental value for her.

It was clear that the thief had moved silently through the house and taken great care not to disturb anyone further.

At half-past six this morning, Superintendent Fontaine called Justice Headley to conduct an investigation in his home. Naturally, the family was highly alarmed but relieved that no more had been stolen.

It seems that there has been recent prowling by thieves in this area of Milltown, likely taking advantage of the darkness resulting from malfunctioning electric lights.

Thief Spotted Multiple Times
Mrs. Frederic Bauries spotted a man near her kitchen door at 1 o’clock one morning. He disappeared immediately. She had also noticed someone prowling around Justice Headley’s property around midnight on another occasion.

On a separate occasion, she frightened off a man attempting to enter her neighbor Charles Sevenhair’s window.

The same thief proceeded to David Nevius’ house and woke him up around 5 o’clock this morning. The thief was seen searching through Mr. Nevius’ trouser pockets. Mr. Nevius attempted to confront the thief but had trouble loading a cartridge into his gun, allowing the thief to escape. The thief managed to steal some money during this encounter.


This Day in History: December 21st, 1920

Milltown National Bank at Michelin Tire - 1924

“Sailor” Voorhees Is Captured With Watson In Daring Attempt to Rob Milltown Bank; Knocked Unconscious by Bullet; Two Escape

Force Way Into Vault But Abandon $3,000 in Silver When Surprised by Posse

Local Man Charged with Long Series of Crimes Captured by Posse – Bandits Fail to Get Bank Loot – Planned to Rob Post Office.


Frank “Sailor” Voorhees of this city, sought for nearly two years by the police of New Brunswick and a dozen other cities, was captured last night with a companion. Walter Watson. of Melrose, Mass., in an attempt to rob the First National Bank of Milltown. Two other men who were with them managed to escape.

Voorhees and Watson, who first gave his name as Clifford Jackson of New York, were captured after a top chase by a posse of citizens hastily gathered by Mayor Christian Kuthlthau of Milltown after Herman Willenbrock, a nightwatchman at the Michelin Tire Co. plant, had reported the robbers at work. In attempting to scale the wall in front of the bank, Voorhees was struck a glancing blow in the head by a bullet and was knocked unconscious. He was seized as he fell to the ground and Watson was captured at the same time. The two other men escaped through the rear of the bank property along Lawrence brook and eluded their pursuers there.

The robbery occurred at about midnight last night. Shortly after even o’clock an automobile, without lights, and said to contain four men and a woman, was seen proceeding along Main street, Milltown, in the direction of the bank. The car was seen by a group of young men in front of the Michelin Community House, but little attention was paid to it. The car turned into John street and stopped there.

Some time later when Night Watchman Herman Willenbrock was making his rounds of the Michelin plant the bank being located in one of Michelin buildings he saw a man standing in a doorway opposite the bank. As Willenbrock passed the man whistled, and Willenbrock saw another man inside.

Posse Called Out.

Instead of attacking the men. Willenbrock at once informed Head watchman Charles Beecher. The latter got in touch with Mayor Christian Kuhlthau of Milltown, who immediately went to the bank, gathering a  posse of about forty men, armed with rifles, shotguns and revolvers, on the way. So quick were they that they reached the bank within ten minutes after the alarm was given.

The robbers apparently had not, paid much attention to the watchman, for they were still in the bank when the posse approached. The posse closed in from all sides in an attempt to surround the robbers, but their eagerness to get Voorhees and Watson the other men eluded them.

Several volleys were fired at the escaping robbers, but apparently, the only one that took effect was the shot that hit Voorhees. It passed through his derby hat and glanced along the top of his head.

Voorhees was picked up and caried into the bank office. Dr. Riva was immediately summoned, but before he completed his examination of the man Voorhees came to and was able to sit up. Both prisoners were brought to New Brunswick and were lodged in the county jail.

County Detective John Ferguson was summoned from New Brunswick and began an investigation of the case at once.

The car which the men had used was found on John street and was seized and brought to New Brunswick by Detective Ferguson and Superintendent Robert Matlack of the Russell Playing Card Co. No trace could be found of the woman said to have been with the party and Voorhees and his companion denied that any woman had been with them.

“Sailor” Voorhees

Broke Into Vault.

It was found that the robbers had forced an entrance into the bank by wrenching a bar from a rear window and that they then dug a hole about a foot square through the brick wall of the bank vault, but. they were unable to force the safe inside the vault in which most of the money was contained.

A bag containing $3,000 to silver was found in the yard in the rear of the bank, apparently handed out by one of the men but abandoned when they were surprised.

All the safe deposit boxes in the vault had been opened and their contents scattered around, but it was impossible for bank officials to say whether anything had been taken from these or not, and it was reported that $2,400 in Liberty Bonds had been secured. Bank officials said that nothing else had been taken and they were not sure whether these bonds were secured or not.

Voorhees was quite willing to talk after his arrest and said that he had planned this to be his “last trick” and that if he had been given five minutes more he would have escaped. He said that it had also been planned to rob the Milltown post office.

A man was said to have been seen loitering around the post office last night. He also declared that it had been planned to take the loot to Trenton by automobile and then go back to New York by train.

Long Wanted Here.

Voorhees has long been a thorn in the sides of police and county officials here and has been suspected of being the ringleader in half a dozen holdups and robberies. He is wanted by the county detectives for the two Wolfson robberies, the attempt to rob Tepper Brothers, the holdup of the Hanover Shoe Store, and robberies of Houghton and Strauss, S. Spitz, Stewart and Clayton, in New Brunswick, the local Y. M. C. A. and Sol Rubenstein’s at Perth Amboy.

He is also wanted in New Bedford, Mass., where he broke Jail on July 30 last, New Rochelle, Peekskill and White Plains, N. Y., and Elizabeth and Plainfield in this State. Watson is also wanted in New Bedford.

The men have been in New York for some time, they said, and Voorhees declared this morning that on one occasion he escaped from a house there just as County Detective. Fred David entered.

Detective David has taken up the chase of the two men who escaped end hopes to have them in custody shortly. He refused to talk in reference to the statements made by the men.

It is not known yet whether Voorhees and Watson were implicated in the Stillman and Woolworth robberies, but these are being carefully investigated.

Alfred S. Puerschner, warden of the county jail, took no chances on letting his prisoner escape and he remained on guard himself all night, at the jail. Special precautions are being taken to safeguard the prisoners.


This day in History: March 11, 1904

This day in History: March 11, 1904

“FAST LINE” BUMPS A MAN ON TRACKS – Cuts Off an Arm and Nearly Kills Eugene Ellingham.

PROMPT MEDICAL ATTENTION SAVES THE FELLOWS LIFE – HE WAS ON THE TRACKS — ACCIDENT HAPPENED NEAR MILLTOWN.


Eugene Ellingham, who lives near the Red Lion tavern, was struck by a car of the Trenton and New Brunswick “Fast Line” a short distance from where the road leaves the line of the Middlesex and Somerset traction Company at Milltown last night. He was badly injured. The prompt medical assistance which he received doubtless saved his life.

The man was on the tracks when car No. 28, in charge of Motorman Kohlhepp and conductor Haley, came along at a high rate of speed. The motorman saw the man on the tracks but could not slow down quickly enough to save the fellow.

The car was stopped and the car crew picked the injured man up, put him board the car and hurried him to the office of Dr. Riva, at Milltown. Dr. Riva temporarily dressed the man’s injuries and sent him on to this city in the trolley car.

At the corner of George and Washington streets, the car was met by Dr. Schuyler Clark and the ambulance.

Dr. Clark found that the man was in a very serious condition. His right arm so badly crushed that had to be amputated at the elbow. there were several scalp wounds on the back of the head and body bruises and an injury to his spine. He ordered the man taken to the hospital as quickly as possible.

The man’s condition at the hospital to-day was more favorable and this afternoon a second operation was performed by Dr. Alsop, who amputated the arm higher up.

The injured man has been unable as yet to give any account of how the accident happened. He has been only semi-conscious.