This Day in History: Wed. May 14th 1924

This Day in History: Wed. May 14th 1924

COST OF FIRE HOUSE AT MILLTOWN SET AT $15,000; MERCHANT SUBMITS PLANS


Milltown, May 14th – Architect Alexander Merchant submitted to the borough council on Monday night a sketch of the proposed new Fire house which is to be erected on the Cottage avenue side of the playground in the rear of the school. The cost of the building, submitted for approval of the officials was estimated at $15,000. A figure far in excess of what the borough fathers anticipated on spending. The plans, however, call for a magnificent home for the fire fighters. With a large place to house two machines on the ground floor. On the upper floor will be a meeting room and a recorder’s office.

It is also planned to have a lockup on the ground floor where “customers” may be kept over night. The plans call for a brick building. After debating the price, the councilmen could not come to any agreement on the subject and consequently had to lay the matter on the table for further consideration in view of the fact that only $8,000 was set aside in the budget for this purpose.

It is also planned to have a lockup on the ground floor where “customers” may be kept over night.

A request was received from the owners of Booream avenue asking the borough to take over the street. This was referred to the borough engineer to investigate. If the street is found in acceptable condition, the council will no doubt take it over at the next meeting. This refers to the eastern part of the street or the extension which has been opened during the past year. The street was recently scraped by the owners.

A very serious situation has arisen at the sewerage disposal plant in taking care of the waste from the eastern section of the borough or the part from the Russell Playing Card Company to the plant. It seems that this waste comes through the pipes in clugs due to the wax-like waste material which runs out from the Card Company plant. Many complaints have been made but the condition is such that only a clean out of the pipes every two days will remedy it. Further consideration of this matter will be given attention at the next meeting.

The “welcome” signs are, here and will be erected at the various places as soon as chairman of the streets committee can secure permits. They give a glad welcome to strangers when they enter the town and ask them to call again when leaving, They are to be erected at Miller’s. the entrance to Milltown from South River on the main street, at the big bridge, at Riva avenue bridge, at Elkins Lane, and at Ryder’s Lane.


10/04/1956 - HOSE COMPANY - These are 29 of the 40 members of the Eureka Hose Company No. 1 of the MIlltown Fire Department. The men with their equipment are pictured in front of their headquarters, the Cottage Avenue firehouse, built in 1925.
10/04/1956 – HOSE COMPANY – These are 29 of the 40 members of the Eureka Hose Company No. 1 of the MIlltown Fire Department. The men with their equipment are pictured in front of their headquarters, the Cottage Avenue firehouse, built in 1925.

This Day In History: April 13, 1919

This Day In History: April 13, 1919

HOW MILLTOWN COULD BE TRANSFORMED: SUGGESTION THAT IT BE MADE TO REPRESENT “A LITTLE BIT OF FRANCE TRANSPLANTED TO AMERICA”

(By HELEN McCALLUM)


Ever since the time General Lafayette came across the ocean with his army and held out a helping hand to America in Revolutionary days, there has been a bond of friendship between America and France and it has been doubly, yes trebly cemented by the events of the recent war.

One of the results of this is bound to be an interchange of ideas, customs and manners between French and American people. It is shown already in many ways; our “doughboys” returning from France tell us in glowing phrases of the beauty of the French villages and cities – those that escaped the fury of the enemy – while many who have been abroad before and seen the pretty communities that have been devastated. Find no words to express their regret that such beauty should be lost.

People who have been in France say that Milltown possesses the natural physical elements that go to make up these cozy French towns and this idea suggests the possibility of converting New Brunswick’s suburb into a really and truly villa patterned after the best in France.

People who have been in France say that Milltown possesses the natural physical elements that go to make up these cozy French towns

Hellen mccallum -1919

There are a number of French families in Milltown now; there are French people coming to America constantly who would be attracted to a place that suggested home to them. Needless to say these people would probably be only too glad to keep up the idea of combining their efforts to inoculate France beautiful into New Jersey.

Milltown can afford to grow, to expand. The opportunities and possibilities are there and perhaps this plan is just the incentive needed to start the wheels of progress turning” towards a big destiny. There are hundreds of ways this could be done. Start a few civic features with the French idea predominating, follow this with French architecture for the houses, encourage French ideas in the  shows revamp the hotels with a French “menage” then watch Milltown grow!

Of course it would take time and some money, but with the natural advantages already there, these would he a secondary and third consideration in comparison to the investment for the future. Think of the towns that have no foundation to build a distinctive reputation on, then of the splendid one Milltown has to achieve an international reputation if a little initiative and effort are used to establish a French “atmosphere” there.

The Michelin Tire factory has an opportunity to expand, to treble or quadruple its present capacity through the adoption of this idea. Then, too, other industries would be attracted to the place and the first thing you know instead of running over to Paris for their season’s wardrobe, New Yorkers might be taking a Gray bus or trolley to Milltown for the same purpose.

Yes, Milltown (I think I’d change that name perhaps I’d call it “Michelin”) might endearingly be referred to as a “bit of France transplanted to America.”

Slight alterations to many of the homes would give them much of the sought French effect. A little touch here and there would do the trick.

Slight alterations to many of the homes would give them much of the sought French effec

Hellen mccallum -1919

It would be a good thing for the other Milltown industries as well as the Michelin. a good thing for the stores and shops and I would not be surprised if the Raritan River Railroad would contribute liberally to the carrying out of the plan.

Milltown has a real French millinery with a French madame in charge now. Maybe she is to be a pioneer in a new field. There is room for the French and the other industrious folk there now to get along splendidly in Milltown and to greatly increase the size and attractiveness of the place. It is a very nice town now.


This day in History: March 31, 1916

This day in History: March 31, 1916

BOOMING BOROUGH IS CORRECT NAME FOR THIS PLACE

Some New Announcement to Indicate the Town’s Growth Appears Daily – New Dry Goods Store –  Opening of Drug Store – Rev. Hand’s Family Get Another Surprise.


MILLTOWN, Mar. 31. The name of “The Booming Borough” can be applied better to Mllltown every day. As In addition to all we have said about new establishments here the latest to announce, even though some details are lacking, Is the breaking of ground on the Schoppe property yesterday for what is said will be a store and flat. The store, it is understood, will be in the nature of a ladies’ and possibly a gentlemen’s furnishing department to be conducted by the owners of the property.

There is but one regular dry goods store at the present time and the probabilities are that another establishment of this kind will be a success. The flats too will be in demand as under the present advantages of modern improvements they can be made very comfortable.

“The Booming Borough” can be applied better to Mllltown every day

The daily Home News – March 31, 1916

Formal Opening of Drug Store

The advertising columns of today’s issue announce the formal opening of Milltown’s new and only drug store by Alfred W, Moore, whose place of business is in the Rosse Building on Main street.

As stated, before Mr. Moore brings with him valuable experience gained by practical service In the laboratory of Charles Stuckert, prescription specialist of Trenton. A box of candy will he given to all customers as a souvenir at the opening tomorrow.

Harry Hermann to be Married

The engagement of Harry Hermann, captain of the Michelin track team, to Miss Pearl Johnson, of South River, has been announced. The nuptials will be solemnize on April 6. Captain Hermann is popular and has the sincere wishes of many friends for a happy future.

Ground Broken for Improvement

Ground has been broken for the installation of water in the Methodist parsonage.


This day in History: March 29, 1916

This day in History: March 29, 1916

Booming Milltown to Have Four Grocery Stores


MILLTOWN, March 29th. The latest news in the history of the Booming borough- of Milltown is the leasing of a portion of the Denhard premises on South Main street to The Atlantic & Pacific Tea Company of New Brunswick where they will open a store next week. The property is now being improved by the installation of a store front and other renovations are being made which improvements are expected to be finished by the later part of the week.

Milltown already has three grocery stores doing; a good business and the possibilities are that this now establishment will also thrive as the A. & P. have already an established trade here as a result of the Business secured by deliveries made by wagon from New Brunswick for a number of years.


This day in History: March 12, 1903

This day in History: March 12, 1903

A HORSE CASE IN DISTRICT COURT.

Hoboken and Milltown Mixed up in a Replevin Suit.

The Daily Home News – Thurs. March 12, 1903


A horse and wagon figured in a complicated case in the District Court this morning. The first scene of the story revealed at the trial was in Hoboken, where Mr. and Mrs. Nicholas Ehlers used to keep a grocery store. Some months ago they sold out the business to Frederick V. Gehrs, who assumed charge. Then Mr. and Mrs. Killers moved to Milltown, taking with them a horse and wagon, which Gehrs understood belonged to the business he had bought.

The next scene was in Milltown, where Andrew Hopper came from Jersey City with a claim against the Ehlers family. They gave him a bill of sale for the horse and wagon to satisfy the claim. He sold the outfit to Mrs. Ida C. Hermann, who keeps a bakery in Milltown. Later on Gehrs came for the horse and wagon and found that they were gone. He had them seized on a writ of replevin and brought suit in the District Court here for them.

This caused the third scene in the District Court room before Judge Hicks today. The case is known as Gehrs vs. Hermann, but Mrs. Hermann is really a disinterested party in the case, the suit really being against Hopper, who will have to make good to Mrs. Hermann if the plaintiff wins the case. Fred Weigel, of this city, represented Mrs. Hermann. Albert C. Gehrs and John P. Duffy, of Hoboken, represented the plaintiff, and Lawyer Fallon, of Hoboken. represented Mr. Hopper. Decision was reserved.

Judge Hicks this morning gave a judgment of $300 and costs to the plaintiff in the case of Charles W. Russell vs. Fred Stelle, on contract,