This Day in History: November 24th, 1920

Michelin tire Promotional Postcard 1910

LIQUOR SALES AT MILLTOWN HIT BY COMMERCE BOARD


MILLTOWN, Nov. 24-The first luncheon-meeting of the Milltown Chamber of Commerce was held last evening at the Michelin Cafeteria which proved to be one of the most interesting meetings ever held by this body. A feature of the gathering was the condemnation of the borough’s present “wide-open” condition.

Those present were: Frank G. Boyce, J. M. Crabiel, H. A. Christ, W. R. Evans, E. V. Emens, J. P. Herbert. Ida J. Hermann, William S. Hannah, J. H. Junker, J. Knoll. Jr., M. Kropp. John Klotzbach, C. Kuhlthau, K. Kuhlthau, W. H. Kuhlthau, C. W. Kuhlthau, Geo. Kuhlthau, Geo. Lowne, H. R. M. Meyers, Spencer Perry, C. C. Richter, C. M. Snedeker. Philip Simpson. Harold J. Schlosser, Addison Thompson. Fred Wagner, Charles Zimmerman, Mrs. Chas. Hodapp. Miss Susie Crabiel, Louis Slon. Irving Crabiel, Dr. S. F. Weston and Howard S. DeHart.

After the luncheon which was thoroughly enjoyed by all the regular meeting was indulged in, President John H. Klotzbach presiding. Clerk of the Board of Education Howard S. DeHart made the first address of the evening in presenting the business side of the Board of Education to those present, presenting the fact that the larger attendance, higher cost of textbooks, higher salaries paid teachers, etc., of today, have a great bearing on the great expense that is attached to our school today, especially calling attention that the transportation of our children which alone runs up as high as four thousand dollars in the course of a year. Mr. DeHart urged the hearty co-operation of the folks of the town to insure proper training of the children.

Dr. S. F. Weston, supervising principal of the school, was the next speaker of the evening on the Relation of School to Education, what education does toward making for a safer democracy, and also how the social and recreational education of a child tends to develop that child in the higher and better methods of life. Dr. Weston dwelt upon the opportunities afforded today to the man or woman who has been properly prepared for life by means of an education.

The fact was brought out as to following out the methods of instruction as laid down by the State and that the local school is complying with all requirements of the State body with exception of the fact that there is no domestic science department at this time. The reason being given that up to this time there has not been sufficient room, and secondly, the Board of Education did not feel financially able to put on any more expense than they were absolutely compelled o at this time.

The fact was also brought out during the discussions that while a four-room addition is being added to the present school structure it will not be many years before more room will be required. The Clerk stated in fact that if it was not for the high cost of building materials and Labor a new eight-room school would have been asked for at this time instead of only a four room addition to the present building.

The second question on the calendar-Does Milltown get a share of fish and game in comparison with the licenses issued? Many of the sportsmen present did not think Milltown did get a fair share of game and upon the suggestion of those present a committee of three was appointed to make an investigation and report back to the Chamber at the next meeting, namely: Fish and Game Committee: Charles Zimmerman, Charles Snedeker, Harold J. Schlosser. The question of can Milltown have its own electrical inspector to insure better service in Milltown was thoroughly discussed and the sentiment was that Milltown should have its own inspector.

Who knows the police signal system? This question was spoken upon by chairman of the police committee of the borough council, Harold J. Schlosser who explained that if anyone desired a policeman at any time to call the Michelin Tire Company and they would be sure to find one of the town officers there at any time during the day and any time in the evening up to 11 30 o’clock. It was pointed out that an arrangement had been made some years ago with the Telephone Company so that the telephone operator would know just what course to pursue. By mutual consent the matter was left in the hands of the borough council for their consideration.

After a discussion of the trolley service being given to Milltown at present, the following resolution was adopted, the secretary being instructed to forward a copy to the superintendent at New Brunswick and also one copy to headquarters in Newark, namely:

Whereas, the Public Service Railway Company has recently placed in operation cars between Milltown and New Brunswick on a fifteen minute schedule.

“Resolved, that the Chamber of Commerce voice its approval of this progressive step, and that we extend our thanks to the Railway Company, and sincerely trust that this arrangement may continue in effect permanently to the mutual advantage of the Railway Company and the people of our community.

“Resolved further that it would also be very much appreciated if the “Milltown only cars” could be run as far as Heinz’ Switch so-as to give South Milltown residents service equal to that of North Milltown residents.

“Resolved further, that a copy of this resolution be forwarded to the General Manager of the Public Service Railway Company at Newark and a copy to the local superintendent at New Brunswick.”

Would a retail merchants association be of interest to Milltown business men was discussed favorably and the following committee was appointed to make investigation and report at the next meeting with the view of getting such an organization underway: Retail Merchants Committee: C. W. Kuhithau, F. G. Boyce, H. A. Christ.

Harry R. B. Meyers, ex-president of the Chamber of Commerce came out forcibly on the question of law and order, pointing out the amount of drunkenness in Milltown, the bold and open sales of liquor, the playing of poker, shooting of craps and the like. It was pointed out that there: is no time like the present for a general cleaning up in this respect and upon motion, the secretary was authorized to communicate to the Borough Council that the subject of law enforcement was thoroughly discussed at this meeting of the Chamber of Commerce and ask that the Council give the matter their very careful consideration.

Harold J. Schlosser, chairman of the police committee, was given an opportunity to express himself. He stated that there were violations of the law going on and only recently a crap game was raided but for some reason or other there was no publicity given the matter.

It was pointed out that a general. clean-up that would keep the town boys out of questionable games and pastimes would not only be in the town’s interest but in the interest of the boys themselves as far as their economic advancement is concerned.

It was also pointed out during the discussion that any organization that would permit gambling in its rooms. was not only a disgrace to the organization but to the town as well.

An editorial from one of the country newspapers setting forth a plan to gain information as to the attractiveness of a town by sending out a questionnaire to each member asking what induced them to come to the town in which they live was read by the secretary for future information of the Chamber.

Charles E. Denhard and Louis Sion were admitted into membership of the Chamber.

The Civic Department of the Chamber of Commerce reported that the Hallowe’en celebration was the most successful affair of its kind ever held in this section. The financial report of the celebration was as follows:

Amount of Collections

John Christ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00

Alfred Christ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5.00

Dr. Forney. . . . . . . .  . . . . . . . . . .  . .$5.00

C. W. Kuhlthau. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5.00

Buster Brown Shoe Store. . . . . . . . . $5.00

Hugo Laufer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2.00

Mrs. McGaughey. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2.00

Mrs. L. J. Hermann. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1:00

Frank Hodapp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5.00

Frank Hodapp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5.00

H. A. Christ Co…….. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5.00

Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $50.00

Expenses

Music for dancing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.00

Hall decorations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5.49

Red lights. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4.80

Prizes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $40.00

Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $82.29

The $50.00 collected having been used for payment of bills as indicated above, the following were or- dered paid out of the funds of the Chamber of Commerce to make up the deficit, namely:

J. M. Crablel, advances…. .$22.00

Estate C. Hodapp . . . . $4.80

Mae E. Kuhlthau, sundries… . . $5.49

Total . . . . . . . . . . .$32.29

General expenses were ordered paid

as follows:

C. Jensen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  $4.00

J. H. Junker, secretary, stamps

envelopes and post cards . . . . . . . $2.03

The following resolution was adopted:

“Whereas the Chamber of Commerce of the Borough of Milltown in regular session assembled at the Michelin Cafeteria are fully aware of the educational, recreational and social advantages that the Michelin Community House affords to the Borough of Hilltown, be it and it is hereby

“Resolved that a vote of thanks by the Chamber of Commerce be ex-tended to the Michelin Tire Company for their untiring efforts to make Milltown not only an attractive place to live but to work as well. “Resolved further that a copy of this resolution be sent to the Michelin Tire Company and that a copy be spread upon the minutes of this organization.”



Church Notices.

Tomorrow morning at the Re- formed Church John Schmidt will occupy the pulpit at 10:20 in a special Thanksgiving service. A special collection for the Middlesex Hospital of New Brunswick will be taken. All are cordially invited to attend.

Tonight will be Women’s Home Missionary night at the St. James Church, New Brunswick, and all local members are urged to attend the meeting.

The Women’s Republican meeting scheduled for tomorrow night has been postponed by the president, Mrs. Kuhlthau, and will be held next week. All members are asked to please vote.

Mr. and Mrs. Irving Crablel have returned from their wedding trip spent in the New England States.

Friday, December 10, has been set aside by the Reformed Church Ladies’ Aid Society for their annual Christmas sale in Fed Men’s hall.

The bazaar or fair now in progress by the local Catholic mission will close tonight and it will be the last chance to get some real Christmas gifts at real bargains. Dancing will

also be enjoyed. A large crowd was on hand last night.

Movies.

For the first time, Douglas Fairbanks will appear on the screen in Milltown tomorrow night when the Michelin Community House opens for the screen stars to entertain local people. A big crowd is expected to see the opening show in the borough. For the attraction here in the afternoon see the sporting page.


This Day In History: July 20th, 1919

This Day In History: July 20th, 1919

SOLUTION OF THE MUNICIPAL EXPANSION PROBLEM GIVEN BY NOTED EXPERT ON CIVIC IMPROVEMENT


Select a committee of dynamite men who have the confidence of the community: let them name an energetic committee to carry out any plan decided upon by the original committee; secure the services of an expert to aid in the work determined upon; and have a survey made of existing’ conditions so as to determine the best course to pursue.

This was the solution of the municipal expansion problem presented to the people of Milltown, at the second meeting of the Milltown Chamber of Commerce held in the Borough Hall last Wednesday night, by Mr. Perry R. MacNeille, an expert in civic planning who has done much to aid the government in the housing proposition, and pioneer in city building. Mr. Mac Nellie was secured through The Sunday Times, which has taken a great interest in the question of civic development, not only with regard to New Brunswick but also with the view of presenting ideas and making suggestions that would aid other communities in making their municipalities better places to live in.

Following Mr. Mac Neille’s address the Milltown Chamber of Commerce, of which Mr. H. R. B. Meyers is president, voted to have a survey made in accordance with the plan suggested by the speaker. What he said in his very practical talk to the people of this borough will apply to any community and if followed out will prove beneficial to other municipalities.

Planning Too Much.

In discussing the question of “Municipal Expansion,” the title he gave to his talk, Mr. Mac Neille said it was a great mistake to mass up too great a quantity of things one would like to do and not do anything. The great danger of a meeting of this sort was that one got an inspiration to do thinks but this often wasted itself away before anything material resulted.

“Be slow to determine the thing to be done and be rapid in setting the energies at work to do it,”

Mr. Mac Neille said he lived in a suburban community of New York where he went to rest and sleep. His business was in New York and it made no difference to him how long the town remained as dead as it was so long as it did hot become deader.

“But those of you who are in business here,” declared Mr. MacNeille, “are irrevocably committed to the program of civic expansion. Your success or failure, your happiness or misery, is tied up in this town. The majority of you cannot leave Milltown

“And no matter what your business is, no matter where your market your business cannot grow unless the town grows.”

He was sorry to say, however, that the storekeepers too often happened to be the blind ones in the matter of civic expansion, that the manufacturers, whose market was outside of the town, were not always the wideawake ones and the storekeepers were the laggards.

What Live Men Can Do.

As an illustration of the possibilities of a wide-awake Chamber of Commerce, Mr. Mac Neille referred to Pittsburg. There, upon the development of the steel industry at Gary, it was found business was decreasing and people were moving away. The Chamber of Commerce was a live and set to work to overcome this situation. They sent representatives to South America and Russia to get information First handed as to the possibilities of a market there for the products  of Pittsburg. They prepared a book in encyclopedia form, giving an alphabetical list of all the industries of the city and what each manufactured. A copy of this book was placed in the hands of every American consul so that at a glance, upon inquiry being made of him as to where various materials could be obtained, he could furnish the address of the manufacturer in Pittsburg

They also sent $40,000 for a survey in relation to housing, parks, recreation and so on, with the result that Pittsburg is the prosperous city it is today. This showed what a live, energetic Chamber of commerce could do.

Studying the Problems.

The speaker then dwelt upon the necessity of the various problems being adequately studied in order to secure success. There was an opportune time for everything and sometimes it paid to put off the doing of a thing till tomorrow rather than to start it today. Conditions might be better at a later date and twice the energy then aroused than if the undertaking was started at once.

He also cautioned his hearers that if they waited to do a thing, however, until a time when it could be done perfectly it would never be done. There is nothing in this world perfect. The writer of a book had once, he said, withheld its publication for forty years in order that it might be perfect in every detail. It was concerning the life of a king and he had been unable to find out just what the king had done during two weeks of his career. After these many years he found the king had really done nothing at all of interest during that missing period. He had made a trip and stopped along at various points along the way. Yet the world lost the benefits of this book for 40 years in order to make it perfect. Their purpose should be not solely that of making money and of making goods but the rendering of a social service, the achievement of which would place them head and shoulders above all their neighbors.

Task For Milltown.

The task for Milltown, as he saw it was to select first a committee of dynamic men, men who had a vision, men who had the confidence of the community. They should be selected very carefully and should be men who, if they say it is wise for Milltown to do a certain thing the citizens will also say it is wise and support them.

This committee should select another committee of energetic, active men who, when a course is determined upon, will see to it that it is carried through. The services of an export would also be necessary, one who knows all the hitches likely to be encountered in the line of work determined upon and can guard against them so that everyone who works will know that he did something.

Importance of Survey.

Mr. MacNeille impressed upon the members of the Board the importance of making a survey so as to ascertain the economical, geographical and natural advantages, where the markets are, what new markets can be opened up and how old markets can be increased.

Sanitation was to be considered and plan necessary so as to prevent waste in the future, in some cities he said the streets grew wherever the cow wandered. In Altoona, he declared the brain of the engineer became weary and they laid the town out without any regard to future development with the result that some of the streets were so hilly that fire engines could not get up them. At Three Rivers streets were now being closed, because they were built in the wrong place, and new streets being laid to accommodate factories. All because of a lack of plan in the beginning.

A town also needed recreation with its playgrounds. It also needed recuperation. One enjoys a period of rest when he walks through beautiful streets, said Mr. Mac Neille, but he doesn’t get any rest when he walks through ashes.

“In riding through your town this afternoon, I was amazed at the beauty of the rear yards,” he said. “Everything was beautiful except the streets, and it needs so little to improve them the establishment of grade, the laying of a curb and the planting of a little grass.”

Estimating The Cost.

Just as the dressmaker, before starting to make a dress, gets a pattern to go by and estimates the cost so as to be sure her pocketbook will meet the needs, or an architect draws up a plan based upon a certain amount to be spent, so a city not only; makes a plan but prepares a budget so as to know where the money is to come from when needed.

“But money alone won’t build your city,” continued the speaker. Goodwill and good spirit are needed also. The town needs the spirit of all its citizens behind it. The wonderful accomplishments of America during the war was due to the energies of all being centered in winning the war. It is just so with a town. All minds must be centered upon the things to be accomplished to make them a success.”

Milltown, he said, was awake. It had a Chamber of Commerce which had just started out and was on the threshold of its accomplishments. The torch should be kept burning and carried forward. They not only should keep it burning and keep it moving out Keep the vigor there, giving it over to younger men when those carrying it had accomplished all they could. In this way Milltown would become the city pictured by many of those present.

Town To Decide.

Following his talk Mr. Mac Neille answered questions put to him by those in the audience. In reply to one questioner, he said it was up to the people of the town to decide upon what they wanted. They could tell in a general way what appealed to them, what they most missed. From all the suggestions made that favored by the majority should be chosen first and if the committee found it desirable and sanctioned it that made its success assured.

Mac Neille met a number of the residents of Milltown during his short stay there and was much interested in the town and its success. He found the people anxious to do whatever they could to develop the town. Everywhere there was a spirit needed to back up municipal development. That the townspeople appreciated his visit was shown by a standing vote of thanks given him at the Chamber of Commerce meeting.


This Day in History: July 14th, 1919

This Day in History: July 14th, 1919

MILLTOWN, July 14. Tonight is the time set to fittingly observe the independence of France In the borough when the French national holiday will be duly celebrated with a splendid program.

A street parade at 7 o’clock in which the war veterans of France will take a most prominent part, the local Red Cross of which every member Is asked to be In line with their usual costumes, the French school children and various other organizations along with the Michelin band will make up the line.

After the parade a patriotic meeting will be held at the Michelin Park at which Judge Peter F. Daly will speak, and Capt. Charles Reed, who was severely wounded in France, will give a description of the army life. Other numbers are on the program and the climax of the anniversary program will be a block dance on the ball diamond. This ought to be a splendid affair and everyone should turn out to celebrate the occasion.

Chamber of Commerce

Wednesday night is the regular meeting night of the Chamber of Commerce and arrangements have been completed to make this an unusually attractive meeting. The New Brunswick Sunday Times yesterday gave a fine description of the character and quality possessed for public speaking of the man who will address the meeting on Wednesday evening and all members, along with those who would like to join and citizens in general, are invited to come out and hear the good news that will come to the new borough developing body.

Off for Sea Girt

Elburn Matlack and Harold Glines of this place, left Saturday for Sea Girt, where they will train with the state militia men. both of the local men are members of Co. E of New Brunswick, and the trip down was made in Mr. Matlack’s car.

Arthur Foss, who has seen much thrilling war service in France, is spending a few days with his uncle. John Klotzbach, having arrived last week from overseas.

Installation of Officers

On Thursday evening of this week the installation of the newly elected officers will be held at the Daughters of Liberty lodge room and all members are asked to be present

Parade at 7 P.M.

The French Independence Day parade and celebration will take place promptly at 7 o’clock, and it is the desire of the committee to have a large representation of Milltown citizens In line two or three local organizations will march in a body, but the citizens at large are cordially invited to be on hand and to parade.

The local Red Men have planned to march in a body, and everybody is earnestly requested to meet at the clubhouse promptly at 6.45 o’clock.

Developing and printing for armatures done at Moore’s Drug Store All work guaranteed. Twenty-four hour service. Films and cameras on sale Moore s Drug Store. Red Men’s Building.