This Day in History: August 16th, 1915

This Day in History: August 16th, 1915

LATE PASSENGERS WERE STALLED

Local People Suffer Because of Trouble Caused in Past by Rough Element – Misunderstanding Leads to Embarrassing Situation.


Fully fifty New Brunswickers were stranded at the Milltown car barns, Saturday evening as they were unable to reach this city by trolley. Not being able to secure rooms in the borough they had to be contented with sleeping in the waiting room at the car barns which accommodated about ten. The passengers were provoked with the treatment accorded them by the employees of the Public Service who refused to take them to this city

The passengers boarded the trolley a South Amboy, it being the last car out of the city which only goes as far as the car barns. The trolley went at a fast pace and jumped the track at Yate’s corner South River. After considerable difficulty, the car was jacked up and placed back on the tracks. The passengers were greatly shaken up some being tossed from their seats,

The conductor collected the full fare from South Amboy to New Brunswick which entitled them to ride to this city. The passengers presuming that the car would proceed to New Brunswick, paid the last fare without a murmur.

Arriving at the car barns, a car swung out with several motormen and conductors aboard. Several of the passengers alighted from the South Amboy Car and dashed to the New Brunswick-bound car anticipating a ride to this city. Several got aboard but many more were not so fortunate. The conductor prevented several from jumping aboard the moving car telling them that the car would stop as soon as he swung out of the car barns. As soon as the car swung from the barns the motorman put on more speed and left the crowd standing in front of the barns.

Other Side of Story.

The Public Service side of the story was given to the Home News to-day to the effect that the company…

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had no intimation that there were to be New Brunswickers on the 1 a. m. trolley out of South Amboy, which is due to run only as far as the Milltown car barns, and it is stated that ample accommodations would have been made if such knowledge had been given to the Public Service.

It was about 2.30 a. m. that the trouble occurred at Milltown, and it is said that much of it was due to a rough element that had hung around the car barns with the expressed purpose of riding to New Brunswick on the car which brings the trolleymen to their homes here and which the company is not obliged to run, but does so simply to accommodate their workmen.

So much disorder was shown by this rough element that the car barn employees had to send for the Milltown officers, fearing damage to the property. It is said that a number of men make a practice of remaining in Milltown every Saturday night to ride home on the trolleymen’s car and when the large crowd tried to board it Saturday night the crews were fearful of what might happen en route.

It was not until afterward that the company learned that there were a number of very respectable people in the car that left South Amboy at 1 a. m., and who were stalled at Milltown, and it is said a special car would have been dispatched to Milltown to bring them to New Brunswick if one of them had telephoned to the office here.

Extra cars had been running from South Amboy on Saturday night, the last ones leaving there for through trip at 12.15 Sunday morning.